What's Going On

 

Upcoming meetings/events:


  • Meriwether Commissioners have a regular meetng June 27, 2017 6:00 p.m. Meetings are held at the Meriwether Administration Building,17234 Roosevelt Hwy. Bldg B, Greenville, GA. (See the agenda in Meriwether County News below.)  Also note:

    July 4, 2017 Meriwether County offices closed.
    July 12, 2017 9:00 a.m., Regular Meeting,
    July 25, 2017 6:00 p.m., Regular Meeting.

 

 

 

Community Events:

  • Warm Springs Freedom Celebration is 10:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. July 1. An old-fashioned family-oriented day of fun and celebration in Warm Springs, GA Children are invited to bring their bicycles, wagons and tricycles decorated in patriotic themes to participate in the parade. Prizes awarded for best decorated. Gather at Dinner's Ready parking lot (5928 Spring Street, Warm Springs). Parade starts at 11:00. Kick-off for Warm Springs Marvelous Geoquest at 12:30 followed by games for kids. Come out and enjoy! Sponsored by Meriwether County Tourism. For information contact Meriwether County Chamber of Commerce, PO Box 9, 91 Broad Street, Warm Springs, GA 31830
    706-655-2558, Fax: 706-655-2812
    Carolyn McKinley, Executive Director 
  • Mark your calendars for the Cotton Pickin' and Shady Days 2017 fall festivals: First weekend in October. 

 

          Click Here for more info on Cottin Pickin Fair

          Click Here for more info on Shady Days in Gay Fair.

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MERIWETHER COUNTY NEWS

 

Agenda announced for June 27

Meriwether Board of Commissioners meeting

In accordance with O.G.G.A. 50-14-1, the Meriwether County Board of Commissioners will meet on June 27, 2017 at 6:00 pm. The meeting will be held at the Administration Building located at 17234 Roosevelt Hwy. Bldg. B, Greenville, GA.
If you have questions or need assistance please contact Beverly Thomas at 706-672-3462.
The meeting is open to the public.

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Latest of Meriwether County murals

completed in Greenville
 
The latest addition to Meriwether County’s “Murals and Monarchs” tourism project is a mural in the county seat of Greenville.
Completed in early June, it joins a series of historic murals and butterfly gardens across Meriwether County in a project begun in early 2016. Historic murals have been painted by Hapeville-based artist John Christian in Warm Springs, Lone Oak and Woodbury – and now Greenville.  Next up Christian plans to begin work on a mural in Manchester.
According to Carolyn McKinley of Meriwether County Chamber of Commerce and the Together in Meriwether committee, Greenville’s mural is situated on the building across from Hill Brothers Corner as travelers come into Greenville from LaGrange. The owner of the building agreed to absorb the cost for needed prep work, which took place in early 2017.
A Greenville delegation met with the artist to offer suggestions for what would be included on the city’s mural and a rendering was prepared.
Publix Charities Foundation was a co-sponsor for the Greenville mural with a $3,800 grant. The request for funding to support the Greenville mural was submitted to the George Jenkins family. Mr. Jenkins was born in Meriwether County and graduated from Greenville High School. He was the founder of the Publix grocery stores.
Other funding for the Greenville mural came from the same Tourism Product Development grants, through the Georgia Department of Economic Development, that funded the Woodbury, Warm Springs and Lone Oak murals, McKinley said.
Three separate grants were received from the Tourism Product Development grant program. The first was for butterfly gardens in Warm Springs and Luthersville, then one for the mural in Warm Springs, and a third for the murals in Woodbury and Greenville. The TPD grant program also funded the launch of the county-wide geocache trail with a zombie-themed geocache in Woodbury. 
For Manchester, their mural will go on the Mexican restaurant in the downtown area. "This will be the largest of the murals and the exact composition is still being finalized, but may include the mill (including the pond); a train engine (possibly depicted coming through the map); something representing Manchester High School; the President Theatre; Elliott Station; Bill Mathis; Stuart Woods; FDR receiving a milkshake from M.B. Guy, Jr.; Willie Holloway (first black police chief) and the Rosenwald school," McKinley said.
Plans are for the Manchester mural to be completed by the end of June, according to the terms of a state tourism grant helping fund the mural project.
Meriwether County in October 2016 received a grant through GDEcD from the Georgia Council for the Arts for the Manchester mural project. It is part of GCA’s Vibrant Communities grant. Meriwether County was among 85 entities that received more than $297,963 in funding.
GCA received 112 applications requesting $394,961 from 69 counties across the state. Applicants included libraries, schools, arts centers, cities, historical societies, community theatres, Boys & Girls Clubs, etc. The Vibrant Communities Grant was made available to organizations in counties that did not receive an FY17 Project or Partner Grant.
“Georgia’s communities are filled with great art, inspired artists and bold visions for the ways in which local art can bolster economic development efforts in our communities,” said GCA executive director Karen Paty. “GCA recognizes that a thriving arts community contributes immeasurably to economic and social vitality, and the Vibrant Communities grant is one of the ways in which we support the incredible work happening in our communities.”
As part of the Murals and Monarchs project, butterfly gardens have been developed in Warm Springs, Luthersville and Manchester, and a $5,000 state Tourism Product Development grant was received this January to continue expanding Meriwether’s butterfly garden project with a garden in Woodbury.
Also, paperwork was submitted and applications accepted for the Warm Springs and Luthersville butterfly gardens that were established in spring 2016 to be accepted into the Rosalyn Carter Butterfly Trail. Signage noting the designation is being placed at the two gardens. 
The idea for the butterfly gardens was inspired by a butterfly garden seen by Chamber of Commerce Director Carolyn McKinley in Plains, Ga., home of President Jimmy Carter. First Lady Rosalynn Carter is a supporter of efforts to save the dwindling Monarch Butterfly population, and Meriwether County is part of the Presidential Pathways travel region.
In an additional accomplishment, in December 2016 the Luthersville City Park Butterfly Garden, the Warm Springs Welcome Center Butterfly Garden and the City of Manchester Butterfly Garden had all been added to the UGA Center for Urban Agriculture Pollinator Spaces Project. You can visit the website at: https://ugaurbanag.com/gardens/pollinators/project-gardens/
Gov. Nathan Deal at the 2016 Georgia Governor’s Tourism Conference in September in College Park announced that Georgia’s tourism industry generated a record $58.9 billion economic impact during the last year.
“Tourism has become one of Georgia's top economic generators, as the industry supports more than 439,000 jobs and surpassed $58.9 billion in economic impact last year,” said Deal. “In 2015 alone, a record 100 million visitors came to Georgia to explore our mountains, beaches, big cities and small towns. With a thriving tourism sector and new attractions coming across the state, I have no doubt that next year will follow the trend of exceeding our expectations.”
“A growing, healthy tourism industry is critical to creating a pro-business climate in Georgia by improving our quality of life, accommodations, transportation, arts and entertainment,” said GDEcD Commissioner Chris Carr.

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Community Focus Group meeting set to discuss

small business development in Meriwether

A Focus Group Meeting to discuss Small Business Development in Meriwether County is 5:30 June 22 at the Meriwether County Administration Building. The Honorable State Representative Bob Trammell speaking on Senate Bill 133 ... "Georgia Agribusiness and Rural Jobs Act." Invited speakers: Ms. Maggie Laton, GA Department of Economic Development; Mrs. Corinne Thornton, GA Department of Community Affairs; Mrs. Evette Jones, USDA Rural Development; Ms. April Pruitt, GA Department of Labor. Hosted by Meriwether Commissioner Shirley Hines, Meriwether County Commission, 770-328-9967, s.hines@meriwethercountyga.gov

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​Probate Judge John D. Rasnick

completes Certificate Program

Judge John D. Rasnick of Meriwether County is among 28 Probate Court Judges and Associate Judges from throughout Georgia who were recognized April 18, 2017 for completing the Georgia Probate Court Judges Certificate Program. They earned certificates through the 72-hour professional development program. Training was coordinated by the Carl Vinson Institute of Government in collaboration with the Council of Probate Court Judges and the Institute of Continuing Judicial Education at UGA. The Institute of Government launched the certificate program in 2012 to help judges strengthen their command of court procedures, gain deeper insight into the intricacies of guardianships and estates, and more. Judges must successfully complete 12 hours of continuing education every year to maintain the certificate. Certificates were awarded at the 2017 Probate Court Judges Spring Conference in Macon, Georgia.


Left to Right in photo: Treutlen County Probate Judge TJ Hudson, Mara Shaw, Carl Vinson Institute of Government at the University of Georgia, JUDGE JOHN D. RASNICK - MERIWETHER COUNTY, Barrow County Probate Judge Tammy Brown.

 

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Mr. Robert Lovett recognized by Meriwether County Board of Commissioners
by Brin Jones
06.15.2017

Mr. Robert Lovett was presented with a Proclamation by the Meriwether County Board of Commissioners during their regularly scheduled meeting on June 14th for his past 9 years serving on the Meriwether County Water and Sewerage Authority. Retiring last month in May, Mr Lovette served with the Authority from 2008 thru 2017. 

On behalf of Meriwether County we would like to thank Mr. Lovette for his service and wish him well.  Please see Proclamation below.


PROCLAMATION

 A PROCLAMATION TO RECOGNIZE ROBERT LOVETT FOR HIS OUTSTANDING SERVICE TO THE CITIZENS OF MERIWETHER COUNTY AS A MEMBER OF THE MERIWETHER COUNTY WATER AND SEWERAGE AUTHORITY

WHEREAS, Robert Lovett is a lifelong resident of Meriwether County and graduate of Woodbury High School and a longtime member of Woodbury Baptist Church; and

WHEREAS, Robert Lovett has been married to his lovely wife Sylvia for fifty-three years and they have three Daughters and six grandchildren; and

WHEREAS, Robert Lovett joined the United States Navy in 1958 and attained the rank of Petty Officer Second Class; and  

WHEREAS, Robert Lovett worked for a printing company business for 14 years following his four-year service with the United States Navy before he began working for the Water Treatment Plant in Woodbury; and

WHEREAS, Robert Lovett was a founding Board Member of the Georgia Rural Water Association where is also served as treasurer, vice-president and president; and

WHEREAS, Robert Lovett formerly operated water and wastewater plants in Woodbury, GA for thirty-eight years, and served as a contract operator for treatment systems in Warm Springs, Concord, Talbotton and Greenville; and

WHEREAS, Robert Lovett was appointed to the Water & Sewerage Authority on January 22, 2008, and has continued to serve faithfully until his resignation on May 1, 2017; and

NOW BE IT PROCLAIMED, by the Meriwether County Board of Commissioners on the 14th day of June 2017 that Robert Lovett be, and is hereby, recognized and commended for his outstanding service to the citizens of Meriwether County as a member of the Meriwether County Water & Sewerage Authority; and be it

PROCLAIMED FURTHER that the Meriwether Board of County Commissioners does hereby extend its best wishes to Robert Lovett in all future endeavors. 

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Meriwether County captures another grant opportunity

June 14, 2017

In an initiative driven by Commissioner Shirley Hines and the support of the members of the Meriwether County Board of Commissioners, Meriwether County has been awarded a Rural Development Grant from the Department of Agriculture in the amount of $61,724.00. The grant award was reported to the Board at the June 14, 2017 Board of Commissioners meeting by Finance Director Bill Gregory who had received the news during the Board meeting. County Manager Theron Gay announced the funds have been earmarked to fund a new much needed parking lot for the area behind the Tax building just off the square in Greenville.

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Flags to fly at half-staff for

killed State Corrections officers

June 15, 2017

Flags will fly at half-staff across Georgia Saturday, June 17, and Tuesday, June 20, in memory of two State Corrections officers killed earlier this week.

Gov. Nathan Deal issued executive orders that flags be lowered in honor and memory of Sft. Curtis Billue and Sgt. Christopher Monica.

See the full orders below:

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Meriwether welcomes new Animal Control director

Meriwether County would like to welcome Shawn Downs as our new Animal Shelter / Control Director. With new people come new ideas and a fresh start.

Check out the new Meriwether County Animal Shelter and Control website meriwetherpaws.org and the new Facebook page Meriwether County Animal Shelter and Control.

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Agenda announced for June 14 Meriwether

Board of Commissioners meeting

In accordance with O.C.G.A. 50-14-1, the Meriwether County Board of Commissioners will meet at 9:00 am on June 14, 2017 at the Meriwether County Administration Building, located at 17234 Roosevelt Hwy. Bldg. B, Greenville, GA.
If you need assistance or have questions please contact Beverly Thomas at 706-672-3462.
The meeting is open to the public.

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UGA Extension Meriwether County ANR E-Newsletter
June 9, 2017
 

FUNGI
The Amazing World of Mushrooms
Outside of the mushrooms that you buy in the grocery store or get served up on a pizza or in a salad what do you know about them? Mushrooms often get a bad rap in the landscape but our world would be very different without them. Yes, some mushrooms are the fruiting bodies of pathogens that attack plants, such as Armillaria, but many more are the fruiting bodies of fungi that are beneficial to plants. Most of those “toadstools” that you see right now popping up under or near trees are mycorrhizal. Mycorrhizal fungi form a symbiotic (mutually beneficial) relationship with the roots of plants. The fungi can help plants by accessing and providing water and, perhaps more importantly, phosphorous and nitrogen. In return the plant supplies the fungi with carbohydrates created during photosynthesis. Ectomycorrhizal fungi have the most commonly seen mushrooms found above ground. The amanitas are a large group of mushrooms that are ectomycorrhizal and can commonly be found in the southeastern mixed-forest community dominated by oaks, hickories and pines. The Amanita cokeri (first on the right) was seen on the Pine Mountain Trail last weekend. The beautiful and colorful Amanita jacksonii (second to the right) was one of a group seen under pines at the home of Sherry Carruthers this week-thanks Sherry!
Another critical service that mushrooms perform is the breakdown of leaves and woody tissue especially tough lignin. Imagine if all the trees in the world and their leaves did not decompose when they fell or died! Thanks partly to fungi we don’t live in such a world. Although mushrooms do cool things for our environment my real love affair with mushrooms is based on the incredible range of colors and forms that they take. Due to the recent rain, my latest hike on the Pine Mountain Trail presented me with a specimen of one of my favorites. The coral fungi look just like their common name suggests and are both beautiful and beneficial decomposers.


(For the complete June 9 newsletter, see the page-by-page version posted below!)


Have a wonderful weekend,
Susan

Susan C James
Agriculture and Natural Resources Agent
UGA Extension-Meriwether County
706-672-4235 Office
706-977-0882 Mobile

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Flags ordered to fly at half-staff

Gov. Nathan Deal has issued an Executive Order that calls for flags to fly at half-staff on Friday, June 9, 2017, in honor and memory of SPC Etienne Murphy.

Here is the full text:

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Fun entertainment lineup set for

this weekend’s Peaches in the Pines
June 8, 2017


There will be plenty to do and see at the 2017 Peaches in the Pines festival this weekend, June 10 and 11 at beautiful Lake Meriwether in Woodbury.
From music to enjoy as visitors shop the vendor booths and taste entries in the Barbecue Competition to Cane Pole Fishing for the kids to sightseeing with Blue Ridge Helicopters, there is something for every age and taste. Visitors will also be asked to take part in the “Selfie Challenge” using hashtags #memoriesinmeriwether, #Peachesinthepines and #Lake Meriwether. Registration for the Cane Pole Fishing starts at 10 a.m. 
Entertainment from the stage Saturday, June 10 includes Denny Grimes starting at 9 a.m., followed by Gospel music with Racheal Hartzog at 11 a.m. Just before noon Youhanna Joy will fly a drone to the stage and do a demo for the crowd.
At 1 p.m. begins Contemporary Country music from Tanner Gill & Friends, followed at 1 p.m. by DixieLand Dulcimer with Contemporary Country and Gospel, and at 3:15 p.m. by Jessie Scott Bounds with Contemporary Country and Gospel music. Denny Grimes follows at 4 p.m. 
On the expanded second day of the 2017 festival, Blue Ridge Helicopters returns with sightseeing rides, and the Selfie Challenge continues.
Sunday’s entertainment from the stage includes a return appearance by Racheal Hartzog with Gospel music at 1 p.m., the Men of Cornerstone Quartet at 2 p.m., Kelsey Ray with Contemporary Country and Gospel at 3 p.m., and Light House with Gospel and Blue Grass at 4 p.m.
Admission is free for both days of the Peaches in the Pines arts and crafts festival. In addition to the craft booths, live entertainment, helicopter rides and barbecue tasting contest there is a special Kiddie Korner with activities for the younger set, Georgia Grown produce, and homemade peach ice cream from sponsor Fitzgerald Fruit Farms. 
Special additions joining the festival this year are the Meriwether Miles bicycle ride Saturday morning and a classic car and motorcycle drive-in.
The Meriwether Miles Bike Ride offers 15-, 26- or 62-mile routes. Each of these treks begins and ends at Lake Meriwether. Cost is $25 on race day. All riders will be treated to energizing snacks, drinks and water with rest stops along each route. Day-of registration is Saturday between 7 and 10 a.m. at Lake Meriwether. A portion of the proceeds will be donated to: "Honoring our Veterans." For more information on the Meriwether Miles ride, contact coordinator Gail Coffee, 770-927-2847, or email the Meriwether County Chamber of Commerce at meriwetherchamber@windstream.net .
Festival hours are 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, June 10, and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, June 11.
Lake Meriwether is at 728 Lake Meriwether Road, Woodbury, GA 30293. 
For festival information go to meriwethertourism.com, email meriwethertourism@windstream.net or call 706-655-2558.
Image may contain: one or more people, outdoor and nature

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Youth Life recruiting for summer youth jobs

Youth Life - Greenville is recruiting for youth summer job oppportunities. See the contact in the flyer below: 

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Youth Summer Focus Camp offered

Mark Your Calendars! Youth Summer Focus Camp will be offered at Meriwether County sites in Luthersville and Woodbury June 6-July 7. Registration will be the first day of camp at 8:30 a.m. Adult volunteers are needed to assist students in enrichment skills, sports fundamentals and citizenship skills. For details and contact numbers, see the camp information flyers.

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Peaches in the Pines festival taking vendor applications

Peaches in the Pines festival is taking vendor applications. Peaches in the Pines is a family-friendly outdoor festival located among the tall pine trees at Lake Meriwether Recreational Park. It begins on Saturday, June 10, 2017 from 9:00 a.m. until 6:00 p.m. and will reopen on Sunday, June 11, 2017 at 10:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. There will be a variety of craft and food vendors as well as several activities for the kids. For more information contact Meriwether County Chamber of Commerce at meriwetherchamber@windstream.net or 706-655-2558 We are seeking vendors so if you are interested, give us a call.

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NEW BIKE RIDE JOINS PEACHES IN THE PINES!

Please join us for the inaugral Meriwether Miles Bike Ride on Saturday, June 10, 2017! Choose from one of three routes from easy to challenging, being both fun and attractive, through the rolling hills and quiet back roads of Meriwether County. One route leads to the Red Oak Covered Bridge, the oldest and longest covered bridge n GA. other routes lead past lovely peach orchards and picturesque farms. Distance: Choose from a 15, 26 or 62 mile ride (complete with rest stops spread throughout). Each of these etreks will begin and end at Lake Meriwether, where the Peaches in the Pines Festival will be taking place, complete with homemade peach ice cream! Cost/What you will receive: $30.00 if postmarked by May 20, 2017 or $25 on race day. Riders registered by May 20th will receive a colorful, quality short-sleeved t-shirt with the inaugural logo. All riders, regardless of registration date, will be treated to energizing snacks, drinks and water. **Again, t-shirts will ONLY be provided for those registered by May 20, so register now! Registration/Entrance Fee: To pre-register, please print and fill out the attached registration form. Send this form and a check payable to "MC Tourism" to the following address: Meriwether Miles Bike Ride; c/o meriwether County chamber of Commerce, P.O. Box 9, Warm Springs, GA 31830. Registration (for both those that pre-registered, as well as those looking to register the day of) will take place between 7 and 10:00 a.m. at Lake Meriwether. Who benefits? A portion of the proceeds will be donated to: "Honoring our Veterans." Questions? Contact Gail Coffee via phone: 770-027-2847, or email: meriwetherchamber@windstream.net

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UGA Extension Meriwether County ANR E-Newsletter
May 26, 2017
From Susan Carol James of the Meriwether office:

GROWING EXCEPTIONAL TOMATOES


Learn About Saving Seeds, Heirloom Varieties, Tomato Culture, Diseases and Pests
Rena Abernathy, heirloom tomato aficionado, has been saving seeds for over twenty years and grows around 150 varieties of tomatoes. She will be talking about the best heirloom tomato varieties to grow and how to save seeds for next year's garden. Susan James, the ANR Agent for Meriwether County, will discuss best practices for growing healthy tomato plants and the most common diseases and pests of tomatoes. In SC she worked with both conventional and organic commercial producers of tomatoes.
Saturday June 24 9:30-1:30 AM
Thalia Farms and Apiary
3005 County Line Church Road
Warm Springs, GA 31830
Cost is $5.00 for refreshments and handouts which will include seed saving directions, tomato culture, disease and pest fact sheets, and favorite recipes.
To register please call 706-672-4235.
(Image: Tomato Bounty from Rena’s Garden includes the heirloom tomatoes.)
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WOODCHUCKS

Mike Mengak, UGA Wildlife Specialist, is asking for help in mapping the range of woodchucks in Georgia. If you have seen any on your property please let us know. The more specific you can be about their location the better. He is also interested in photos. 
If you have any information please contact me at 706-977-0882 or scj24262@uga.edu.
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PESTS OF THE WEEK
Southern Pecan Stem Phylloxera
A lot of you will remember this pest from last year. It and the southern pecan leaf phylloxera were everywhere. I probably got more calls about these insects than any other pests. This species creates large roundish galls on pecan and hickory stems that are certainly more noticeable than the leaf galls. The life cycle for the insect is complex including asexual and sexual reproduction. Sexual females that mated last summer will have found a crevice in the bark of a pecan or hickory tree to die. Within her was an egg that over-wintered in the protection of her dead body. At about the same time that the buds on pecan and hickory trees start breaking the egg will hatch and the released female nymph will began feeding on the buds. Within 24-48 hours of feeding gall tissue will start to form around the nymph. This first generation nymph, referred to as the stem mother, is the only one that forms a gall. She will mature in the gall and asexually produce eggs that become wingless or winged females. The winged females will leave the gall and lay eggs on nearby trees. These eggs will produce sexual males and females that mate. The cycle will start over again with a mated female finding a secure place in the bark of a tree to die with an egg sheltered for overwintering in her remains. In the images below are galls on a pecan branch, a sliced opened gall, a mass of eggs in a gall, a nymph from a gall and a winged adult that will migrate from the gall.

(Image: an affected pecan tree branch.)
Generally, galls that form on leaf tissue are not considered damaging. But galls that form on stems and branches will cause dieback. Dieback of new growth means no pecans the following year because they develop on the previous year’s new growth. Research has shown that some varieties are much more suscetible to phylloxera damage than others. Varieties with Stuart or Schley genetics are very susceptible. This area of Georgia has a lot of older trees (some 80-90 years old) that are certain to have Stuart or Schley gentics which may explain why we see a lot of phylloxera damage.


Wool Sower or Strawberry Gall on Oak


There are lots of organisms that produce galls on plants. Usually they are very specific as to the species that they attack. This gall is another that I found this spring on white oak trees. As you can see, galls can come in all shapes and sizes. This gall is actually quite pretty and luckily usually not damging. It is caused by a very tiny cynipid wasp, Callirhytis seminator. Callirhytis species have a life cycle that is even more complex than phylloxera because both asexual and sexual generations produce galls. The asexual stages of some species may remain in galls for two years.
(Close image above of Strawberry Gall.)
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FORESTRY
The UGA Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources Continuing Education Program is hosting a Forest Herbicide Workshop on July 18-19 in the Tift County Extension office at 1468 Carpenter Road South, Tifton GA.
Continuing Education Credits
- Continuing Forestry Education (CFE) Hours - Category 1 (applied for)
- Continuing Logger Education (CLE) Hours - Environment (applied for)
- Pesticide Applicator Certifications (applied for)
Topics to be covered:
· Forest herbicide safety and application
· Selection of forest herbicide adjuvants
· Use of herbicides for aquatic vegetation control
· Integration of herbicide use for site preparation, herbaceous weed control and woody release
· Control of invasive exotic plants in forest stands
The fee for this course is $210, which includes lunch, refreshment breaks, and instructional materials. There is a $25 discount for fees paid and postmarked by July 5, 2017. To register please visit: http://conted.warnell.uga.edu
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WEATHER
Due to the rainfall in Meriwether County this week the Drought Monitor dropped the drought status of most of county to D0: Abnormally Dry. I’ve heard of rainfall totals ranging from 2 to 3.5 inches in the county. Let’s hope it continues.
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SMALL RUMINANTS
Fecal Egg Count Workshop
Dr. Niki Whitley is giving a fecal egg count workshop on June 27, 2017 at 6:00 PM. It will take place in the Upson County UGA Extension office located at 305 S. Hightower Street Suite 170, Thomaston, GA 30286. The seating is limited due to the number of available microscopes.
Please let me know if you want to attend by emailing scj24262@uga.edu or calling 706-977-0882.
The training will focus on identifying parasites, tracking heavy worm-carriers in the herd, understanding refugia, and using these tools in genetic selection. Participants are encouraged to bring samples from their herd. Directions on how to collect a fecal sample using a latex glove are below.
· Put on a clean glove. Apply a nickel size amount of water or water-based lubricant to index and middle fingers.
· Insert index and middle fingers into the rectum of the animal, one finger at a time. No need to go very deep. Spread fingers to allow air into the rectum. The air duplicates fullness in the rectum and a wave of muscular movement will often move feces out into your hand.
· Remove ~4 grams of fecal matter. A good sized adult pellet is about 1 gram.
· Peel the glove off your hand keeping the fecal sample encased within it.
· Squeeze as much air as possible out of the glove. Twist the wrist portion of the glove and fasten with a label (farm and animal ID) making sure the label sticks to itself, as it won’t stick to the glove. You can also twist and tie off the glove and label the glove itself with an indelible marker.
· Store the sample in the refrigerator until it can be analyzed (the sooner the better, but samples can be stored in the refrigerator for a week). If you are collecting many samples at one time, have a cooler with ice on hand to keep the samples cool until you can get them into a refrigerator.


NEXT UP FOR SMALL RUMNINANT PRODUCERS
I have asked Kathey Rice with L & K Farmers Livestock Market in Thomaston, GA to speak to our group. We are looking at the date July 11. The meeting will give you a chance to exchange needs/wants about marketing with an operation that is fairly close. They would like to have the meeting at their place which is located at 2626 Yatesville Hwy, Thomaston, GA 30286. They can offer a meal of rib eye steak sandwiches, cole slaw, desert and iced tea for $5.00. Please let me know if you are interested.
Mr. Terrell Hollis of the Fort Valley State University Meat Technology Center will be speaking on the evening of July 20 at a small ruminant meeting. We will meet again at The Magic City Grill at 6:00 PM. You will be able to order dinner before the meeting. After his visit here we will plan a trip to visit their facility in Fort Valley. You can go ahead and start letting me know if you plan to attend by emailing me at scj24262@uga.edu.
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FORAGES
GrassMasters
We have not set up registration yet but the dates for the classes for the GrassMasters program are finalized so you can get them on your calendar. Classes will be held from 6:30 to 8:30 on the following Thursday evenings: August 31, September 7, 21, 28 and October 5, 19, 26. We will skip a Thursday in September and in October because the Troup County Agricultural Center was already reserved for those dates. That is where the classes will be held and it is located at 21 Vulcan Materials Rd in LaGrange.
The course focuses on the forages proven best for northeast Georgia and strategies for grazing, maintaining soil fertility and health, and managing pests. Members of the UGA Forage Team and U.S. Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service staff members teach the classes. The cost for all seven weeks is $25, and the course is open to anyone interested in improving his or her knowledge of pastureland health or forage and hay production.
If you would be interested in attending the program please let me know by emailing me at scj24262@uga.edu. 
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CATTLE
Lemmon Cattle Enterprises will be auctioning all of its registered Angus during a sale on May 27, 2017 at the farm at 16810 Woodbury Hwy, Woodbury, GA 30293. The sale begins at 10:00 AM. For videos of cattle being offered please visit:
http://www.lemmoncattleenterprises.com/sale.html
UGA Calhoun HERD Sale is on Wednesday, May 31 at 12:30 PM at the NW GA Livestock Pavilion at 1282 Hwy 53 Spur, Calhoun. Offered will be approximately 100 heifers-Angus, Hereford, Simmental, SimAngus and Commercial. Videos are available now at: https://vimeo.com/album/4584504
Meriwether County Cattlemen’s Association
We will be serving barbecue brisket at the Peaches in the Pines Festival on June 10 and 11 as part of the Barbecue Competition. If anyone is interested in helping serve either of those days at our booth please let Susan know: 706-977-0882 or scj24262@uga.edu.
7th Annual Georgia Cattlemen’s Association Summer Conference
The 7th annual GCA Summer Conference will be held in beautiful Hiawassee, Georgia on July 28-29 at the Ridges Resort & Marina. Special speakers for the event will be Lieutenant Governor Casey Cagle who will talk about his time serving as Lieutenant Governor and his vision for Georgia and its largest industry, agriculture and Bo Ryles, Sr. Director of the National 4-H Council who will speak on being a leader in agriculture and how we can take our experiences and impact others in a positive way.
For more information, schedule of events and to register please visit: https://www.georgiacattlemen.org/summerconferenceregistrati…
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GRAPES
Bunch Grapes (and some Muscadine)
The 2017 Southern Winegrape Symposium will take place on June 10 from 8:30 AM- 3:00 PM at the Carroll County Ag Center located at 900 Newnan Road in Carrollton. The program is sponsored by the Vineyard and Winery Association of West Georgia. A pre-registration cost of $50.00 is due by May 30.
For the symposium agenda and to register please visit:
http://www.vinewinewga.com/symposium-2017.html
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LOCAL MARKET
Local peaches, strawberries, onions and other vegetables are available


Fitzgerald Fruit Farms (Greenville and Woodbury area)
The retail shed at 3355 Imlac Road is open and strawberry ice cream is available as well as locally grown strawberries, peaches, squash, tomatoes and onions. https://www.fitzgeraldfruitfarms.com/
https://www.facebook.com/thepeachshed/
Strickland Brothers Farm (Durand and Pine Mountain area)
The strawberry and vegetable field is at the crossroad of Chipley Hwy and John Wallace Road. They are open Mon-Sat. Terry has locally grown green beans, strawberries, yellow squash, Yukon Gold and Red Pontiac potatoes and onions. You can contact Terry at 706-881-2414 or you can visit: https://www.facebook.com/Stricklands-Garden-233167170487274/
Sweet Berry Orchard (Lone Oak and Luthersville area)
Leighanne and Tom Hagan have Festival strawberries for sale. They are located at 6659 Lone Oak Road. You can visit them on Facebook to see when they are ready for u-pick: https://www.facebook.com/TOMandLEIGHANNE/
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LOCAL EVENTS
Peaches in the Pines at Lake Meriwether
June 10, 2017 9:00 am-6:00 pm
June 11, 2017 10:00 am-5:00 pm
Celebrate the 3rd Annual Arts and Crafts Festival with an old-fashioned country flavor. Featuring local artists, live entertainment, food vendors, kids' activities, Georgia grown produce, homemade peach ice cream, barbecue competition, kid’s activities, music, and much more. This year's Peaches in the Pines festival also coincides with the Disc Golf Tournament being held at Lake Meriwether. 
The Meriwether County Cattlemen’s Association will be taking part in the Barbecue Competition. Come by and try the barbecue brisket!
Meriwether Miles Bike Ride
The inaugural Meriwether Miles Bike Ride will take place on Saturday, June 10, 2017. Choose from one of three routes from easy to challenging, all going through the rolling hills and on the quiet back roads of Meriwether County. One route leads to the Red Oak Covered Bridge, the oldest and longest covered bridge in Georgia. Other routes lead past peach orchards and picturesque farms.
Distance; Choose from a 15, 26 or 62 mile ride (complete with rest stops spread throughout). Each of these treks will begin and end at Lake Meriwether, where the Peaches in the Pines Festival will be taking place.
Cost: $25 on race day. Riders will be treated to energizing snacks, drinks and water along the ride. A portion of the proceeds will be donated to: "Honoring our Veterans."
For more information please contact Gail Coffee at 770-927-2847 or email: meriwetherchamber@windstream.net
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Hope everyone has a wonderful Memorial Day weekend,
Susan

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Agendas for May 23 work session,

regular BOC meeting announced

In accordance with O.C.G.A. 50-14-1, the Meriwether County Board of Commissioners will hold a Work Session at 4:30 pm and a Regular Meeting at 6:00 pm on May 23, 2017. The meetings will be held at the Administration Building located at 17234 Roosevelt Hwy. Bldg B, Greenville, GA.
The meetings are open to the Public.
If you have questions or need assistance please contact Beverly Thomas or Allyson Stephens at 706-672-1314.
...........................
AGENDA
MERIWETHER COUNTY BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS
WORK SESSION
May 23, 2017
4:30 pm
I. WELCOME
II. NEW BUSINESS
1. Items to enhance Tax Collections
2. EMS Collections
3. Public Transportation Service Agreement between Meriwether County Board of Commissioners and Three Rivers Regional Commission/use of bus outside County
4. Discussion of Planning Process
5. Capital Improvement Program
III. EXECUTIVE SESSION
Legal
Tax Matters
Real Estate
Personnel
IV. ADJOURNMENT
FUTURE MEETINGS & NOTICES
May 23, 2016 6:00 pm
May 29, 2017 Holiday
..........................
AGENDA
MERIWETHER COUNTY BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS
May 23, 2017
6:00 P.M.
I. CALL TO ORDER
INVOCATION
PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE
II. ADOPT AGENDA
III. MINUTES
1. May 10, 2017 Regular Meeting 9:00 am
IV. MUNICIPAL COMMENTS
V. CONSTITUTIONAL OFFICER’S COMMENTS
VI. DEPARTMENT HEAD COMMENTS
VII. PUBLIC HEARING
1. Case #2 – Carmen Diamond – request rezoning and special use of property identified on Tax Map #70, Parcel #7-9, LD# 10, LL# 98, frontage of 201.90’ with an area of 8.29 acres, from RD to LDR. Proposed use of the property will be: Hobby Breeder of Dogs w/ 2+ liters of puppies/yr. 
2. Case #3 – Timothy S. Adams – request rezone of property identified on Tax Map #80, Parcel #080-008 & 080-007, LD# 8, LL# 182 with a frontage of 4,380’, with an area of 172 acres, from residential to agriculture. Proposed uses of property will be cattle, farming, timber production, row crop. Proposed Structures to be constructed on property are cattle barns and equipment barn.
3. Case #5 – Blake McDonald – request to rezone property identified on Tax Map #43, Parcel #17-2, LD# 3, LL# 122 & 123, no frontage, area of 2 acres, from A-1 to RD. The proposed uses of the property will be for a single-family residence.
VIII. OLD BUSINESS
1. Approval of Proposal for Architectural and Engineering Services for Fire Department
2. Public Transportation Service Agreement between Meriwether County Board of Commissioners and Three Rivers Regional Commission/use of bus outside County
3. Acceptance of documents - CSX Bridge Project
IX. NEW BUSINESS
1. EMS Collections
2. June 10, 2017 Bike Ride Hospitality Team – Bill Coffee
3. Appointment to Recreation Advisory Board District 1, Gay to fill an unexpired term ending 12-31-2017
4. National Police Week 2017
5. Appointment to the Library Board – term expires June 30, 2017
6. Intergovernmental Agreement with the City of Manchester for the President Theatre Inspection
7. Funding for Scrap Tire Grant
X. REPORT FROM FINANCE DIRECTOR
1. Finance Report
XI. REPORT FROM COUNTY ADMINISTRATOR
XII. REPORT FROM COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
XIII. REPORT FROM COUNTY ATTORNEY
XIV. PUBLIC COMMENT
XV. EXECUTIVE SESSION
Legal
Personnel 
Real Estate 
Tax Matters
XVI. FUTURE MEETINGS & NOTICES
May 29, 2017 Closed for Memorial Day
June 14, 2017 9:00 am 
June 27, 2017 6:00 pm
XVII. ADJOURNMENT

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UGA Extension Meriwether County ANR E-Newsletter
May 12, 2017


PEST OF THE WEEK
Ticks on the Move
Recently I was hiking on the Pine Mountain trail. As I stopped to photograph a plant I instantly felt something on my left leg in multiple places. When I looked down I counted four ticks. They seemed to have come out of nowhere. A few days later, I managed to have another tick encounter. I’ve also had calls in the office about ticks in yards. And this week a farmer friend found one on his hand while we were sitting eating lunch. So I believe I can truthfully say that tick season is here.
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) there are five species of ticks present in Georgia, the American dog tick (Dermacentor variabilis), the blacklegged tick (Ioxdes scapularis), the brown dog tick (Rhipicephalus sanguineus), the gulf coast tick (Amblyomma maculatum), and the lone star tick (Amblyomma americanum). Only three of these are likely to be found on humans in Georgia: the American dog tick, the blacklegged tick and the lone star tick.
The American dog tick’s preferred host is, as the name suggest, dogs but it will feed on other large animals including humans. Both the blacklegged tick and the lone star tick will feed on deer, dogs, birds, small rodents, livestock and humans. Besides being problematic as blood feeders all three of these species are able to vector or transmit bacteria that cause diseases in humans.
The American dog tick is the primary vector of Rocky Mountain spotted fever in Georgia. Lyme disease is vectored by the blacklegged tick. Southern tick-associated rash illness (STARI), a disease with symptoms similar to Lyme disease, is transmitted by the lone star tick. There are also other possible pathogens that these ticks can vector so it’s smart to do your best to make sure you don’t encounter them. The day I went hiking I got about a quarter mile down the trail when I remembered that I had not put on insect repellant. If I had been smart I would have turned around and gone back to get it.
According to Dr. Walton Jones in an article in the journal Molecules and Cells “nearly every medically relevant blood-feeding insect that transmits a disease-causing pathogen to humans detects and follows CO2 gradients as part of its host-seeking behavior”. The carbon dioxide that our bodies give off as a part of our respiration, especially in our breath, is one of the main attractants for ticks. There are others though, such as radiant heat, shadows, vibrations and even sounds. Species of ticks differ in their methods of seeking a host. Some are classified as hunters and these will actually pursue a host. Ambushers wait for the host to come to them. They will wait on vegetation with their front legs waving in the air in the direction of one or more of the above attractants. Get too close and they will be on you in a flash.
So, what are the best ways to keep from experiencing a tick encounter? If you know that you will be walking (or riding in an open vehicle) in areas of long grass or underbrush be sure to wear insect repellant on your skin and clothing. Long pants tucked into socks, long-sleeved shirts tucked into pants and boots can help prevent ticks from reaching your skin. Hats can keep them from getting on your neck, around your ears or in your hair. Light colored clothing will make them easier to see if they do get on you so you can remove them quickly.
To keep yards clear of ticks keep the grass cut short and place a barrier of wood chip mulch or gravel between the lawn and wooded areas. A 3-foot wide swath can be especially helpful to protect areas used for recreation and relaxation. Keep pets treated for ticks and do your best to discourage other host animals, including wildlife, from coming into the yard. Some of these though, such as mice, squirrels and chipmunks, may be very difficult to keep out. If you want a backyard wildlife habitat don’t place it near the house or areas of high use.
When you spend time outside, even in your yard, be sure that you check for ticks when you go back inside. Remove clothes and immediately wash and dry them. Check for ticks on all of your body using a full length mirror if necessary. It takes hours for some species of ticks to settle down to feed so take advantage of that time frame to remove them before they can start. If you do get bitten, the CDC recommends that you use tweezers to grasp the tick as close to your skin as possible and pull upwards with a steady, even motion. Clean the area with rubbing alcohol or soap and water. The CDC also recommends that you see your doctor if you develop a rash or fever within several weeks of removing a tick. The doctor will want to know when the bite occurred and if you know what species of tick it was or where you were when it got on you.
I certainly don’t plan to let ticks or mosquitoes keep me from spending time outdoors. But I can assure you that I won’t forget to use my insect repellent the next time I go hiking! Take the simple recommended practices above to protect yourself and you can enjoy the outdoors this summer too.
For pesticide recommendations for repellants and for treating outdoor areas please visit:
http://www.caes.uga.edu/…/…/2017-homeowner/HUMAN-OUTDOOR.pdf
For more information on the biology of ticks please visit:
http://extension.uga.edu/publicatio…/files/pdf/C%20937_2.PDF
For more information on ticks from the CDC please visit:
https://www.cdc.gov/ticks/index.html
For images of the three species of ticks discussed above please visit: https://dph.georgia.gov/…/r…/document/ADES_allaboutticks.pdf
To read Dr. Jones complete article “Olfactory Carbon Dioxide Detection by Insects and Other Animals” please visit: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3887906/
Another source for information on tick feeding behavior: Physiology of Ticks: Current Themes in Tropical Science edited by Frederick D. Obenchain and Rachel Galun.
********************
GRAPES AND VINEYARDS
Muscadines
There will be a muscadine grower roundtable meeting on Wednesday, May 31 from 9 AM-3 PM at Still Pond Vineyards and Winery (575 Still Pond Rd, Arlington, GA 39813) with the new UGA Extension Viticulturist, Dr. Cain Hickey. If you are interested in attending please contact Jay Hathorn, ANR Agent for Calhoun County at jhathorn@uga.edu.
Bunch Grapes (and some Muscadine)
The 2017 Southern Winegrape Symposium will take place on June 10 from 8:30 AM-3:00 PM at the Carroll County Ag Center located at 900 Newnan Road in Carrollton. The program is sponsored by the Vineyard and Winery Association of West Georgia. A pre-registration cost of $50.00 is due by May 30.
For the symposium agenda and to register please visit:
http://www.vinewinewga.com/symposium-2017.html
*******************
SMALL RUMINANTS
Fecal Egg Count Workshop
Dr. Niki Whitley is giving a fecal egg count workshop on June 27, 2017 at 6:00 PM. It will take place in the Upson County UGA Extension office located at 305 S. Hightower Street Suite 170, Thomaston, GA 30286. The seating is limited due to the number of available microscopes.
Please let me know if you want to attend by emailing scj24262@uga.edu or calling 706-977-0882.
The training will focus on identifying parasites, tracking heavy worm-carriers in the herd, understanding refugia, and using these tools in genetic selection. Participants are encouraged to bring samples from their herd. Directions on how to collect a fecal sample using a latex glove are below.
· Put on a clean glove. Apply a nickel size amount of water or water-based lubricant to index and middle fingers.
· Insert index and middle fingers into the rectum of the animal, one finger at a time. No need to go very deep. Spread fingers to allow air into the rectum. The air duplicates fullness in the rectum and a wave of muscular movement will often move feces out into your hand.
· Remove ~4 grams of fecal matter. A good sized adult pellet is about 1 gram.
· Peel the glove off your hand keeping the fecal sample encased within it.
· Squeeze as much air as possible out of the glove. Twist the wrist portion of the glove and fasten with a label (farm and animal ID) making sure the label sticks to itself, as it won’t stick to the glove. You can also twist and tie off the glove and label the glove itself with an indelible marker.
· Store the sample in the refrigerator until it can be analyzed (the sooner the better, but samples can be stored in the refrigerator for a week). If you are collecting many samples at one time, have a cooler with ice on hand to keep the samples cool until you can get them into a refrigerator.
NEXT UP FOR SMALL RUMNINANT PRODUCERS
Mr. Terrell Hollis of the Fort Valley State University Meat Technology Center will be speaking on the evening of July 20 at a small ruminant meeting. We will meet again at The Magic City Grill at 6:00 PM. You will be able to order dinner before the meeting. After his visit here we will plan a trip to visit their facility in Fort Valley. You can go ahead and start letting me know if you plan to attend by emailing me at scj24262@uga.edu.
*******************
CATTLE
Lemmon Cattle Enterprises will be auctioning all of its registered Angus during a sale on May 27, 2017 at the farm at 16810 Woodbury Hwy, Woodbury, GA 30293. The sale begins at 10:00 AM.
For videos of cattle being offered please visit:
http://www.lemmoncattleenterprises.com/sale.html
UGA Calhoun HERD Sale is on Wednesday, May 31 at 12:30 PM at the NW GA Livestock Pavilion at 1282 Hwy 53 Spur, Calhoun. Offered will be approximately 100 heifers-Angus, Hereford, Simmental, SimAngus and Commercial. Videos will be available May 18 at www.ugabeef.com/programs
2017 Beef Improvement Federation Annual Meeting and Research Symposium
The annual convention will be held in Athens, GA this year on May 31-June 3 at the Athens Classic Center at 300 N Thomas Street.
For a copy of the program please visit:
http://beefimprovement.org/…/u…/2017/04/BIF2017Program-1.pdf
To register please visit:
http://beefimprovement.org/…/u…/2017/04/BIF2017Program-1.pdf
*******************
FORAGES
GrassMasters
We have not set up registration yet but the dates for the classes for the GrassMasters program are finalized so you can get them on your calendar. Classes will be held from 6:30 to 8:30 on the following Thursday evenings: August 31, September 7, 21, 28 and October 5, 19, 26. We will skip a Thursday in September and in October because the Troup County Agricultural Center was already reserved for those dates. That is where the classes will be held and it is located at 21 Vulcan Materials Rd in LaGrange.
The course focuses on the forages proven best for northeast Georgia and strategies for grazing, maintaining soil fertility and health, and managing pests. Members of the UGA Forage Team and U.S. Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service staff members teach the classes. The cost for all seven weeks is $25, and the course is open to anyone interested in improving his or her knowledge of pastureland health or forage and hay production.
If you would be interested in attending the program please let me know by emailing me at scj24262@uga.edu.
*******************
Happy Mother’s Day to all the moms out there!
*******************
I hope everyone enjoys the weekend,
Susan
Susan C James
Agriculture and Natural Resources Agent
UGA Extension-Meriwether County
706-672-4235 Office
706-977-0882 Mobile

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Gov. Deal orders flags at half-staff for fallen soldier

Gov. Nathan Deal has ordered flags to be flown at half-staff Friday, May 12, 2017 until sunset on all state buildings and grounds as a mark of respect for the memory of 1st Lt. Weston Lee, 25, of Bluffton, GA, who was killed while on patrol outside of Mosul, Iraq on April 29, 2017. See the full executive order below:

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Agenda posted for 9 a.m. May 10 meeting of

Meriwether County Board of Commissioners

In accordance with O.C.G.A 50-14-1, the Meriwether County Board of Commissioners will hold a Regular Meeting on Wednesday, May 10, 2017 at 9:00 am. The Meeting will be held at the Administration Building located at 17234 Roosevelt Hwy. Bldg. B, Greenville, GA. If you have questions or need assistance please contact Beverly Thomas at 706-672-3462.
The Meeting is open to the public.
On the agenda:
AGENDA
MERIWETHER COUNTY BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS
May 10, 2017
9:00 A.M.
I. CALL TO ORDER
INVOCATION
PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE
II. ADOPT AGENDA
III. MINUTES
1. April 25, 2017 Regular Meeting 6:00 pm
IV. MUNICIPAL COMMENTS
V. CONSTITUTIONAL OFFICER’S COMMENTS
VI. DEPARTMENT HEAD COMMENTS
VII. PUBLIC HEARING
1. Request from Mark and Kris Miller for a Retail Consumption Dealer Alcoholic Beverage License (malt and beverage & wine) at Roadside Wings and Grill. License Representative: Rodney Goss
VIII. OLD BUSINESS
1. Approval of Proposal for Architectural and Engineering Services for Fire Department
IX. NEW BUSINESS
1. Public Transportation Service Agreement between Meriwether County Board of Commissioners and Three Rivers Regional Commission
2. Award TAN note
3. Confirm Right-of-way on Montgomery Road
4. EMS Collections
5. Proclamation - Older Americans Month
X. REPORT FROM FINANCE DIRECTOR
1. Finance Report
XI. REPORT FROM COUNTY ADMINISTRATOR
XII. REPORT FROM COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
XIII. REPORT FROM COUNTY ATTORNEY
XIV. PUBLIC COMMENT
XV. EXECUTIVE SESSION
Legal
Personnel 
Real Estate 
Tax Matters
XVI. FUTURE MEETINGS & NOTICES
May 23, 2017 4:30 pm Work Session
May 23, 2017 6:00 pm
May 29, 2017 Closed for Memorial Day
XVII. ADJOURNMENT

 

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Keep Meriwether Beautiful annual cleanup big success

Keep Meriwether Beautiful's annual cleanup day in Meriwether County was a very successful event. Eight teams made up of 98 volunteers picked up 120.5 bags of trash. The residents of the county cleaned out their homes, yards and area around them to have an overflow of trash in the eight dumpster sites around the county. Dependable Waste, Waste Management and C & C Sanitation provided the containers for our cleanup. Without their support we would not have been able to do the cleanup. There are too many volunteers to name, but without their time, we would not have been as successful.


Shown in the photo are the top three winners for our cleanup: From left to right: Kemeika Bray with Team Durand had nine volunteers and picked up 12 bags of trash. Kameika and her team are first time volunteers and was honored for her efforts. Ginger Hancock, Mayor of Luthersville had 39 volunteers and picked up 56 bags of trash. Charlene Glover, Mayor of Greenville had 4 volunteers that picked up 12.5 bags of trash. They were all presented with a plaque, a Hibiscus plant and a bottle of Warm Springs White House White Wine.

Shown in the second photo are some of the members of the Keep Meriwether Beautiful Committee. Present for the meeting on May 5th were Jane Fryer, Dan Morgan, Commissioner Shirley Hines, Gail Coffee, Kameika Bray, Virginia Hill, Mayor Ginger Hancock, Mayor Charlene Glover, Lisa Thompson, Commissioner Mary Bray, Pat Morgan and Velinda Walton.
For More information, contact:
Jane Fryer, J.Fryer@meriwethercountyga.gov
706/672-3467

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Cutties put in work on Veterans Memorial in Luthersville

Via Commissioner Shirley Hines:
Thanks to Mr. Donald Cuttie and his wife Valerie for their work on this Veterans Memorial in Luthersville.

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UGA Extension Meriwether County ANR E-Newsletter
April 28, 2017

BRAGGING TIME-LOCAL GROWERS
I visited Jim Bowden (pictured right) of Manchester recently who had the most beautiful crop of sugar snap peas that I’ve ever seen. Jim was good enough to let me pick some and they were delicious-raw and slightly steamed. Sugar peas, asparagus and strawberries are my favorites of the crops we can harvest in early spring. Two of these three are grown commercially in Meriwether County and I am hoping that asparagus will soon be planted here too. Jim usually grows produce on contract but he may have produce available locally later in the season.
Florence Byrd of Luthersville came by the office this week with gorgeous peonies (close image above right) from her garden. The flowers were huge (over 6 inches across) and smelled divine. I mentioned how much I loved peonies to Florence when I went to visit her farm back in March and saw that she had a large bed of peonies. I’m so glad that she remembered and that she very generously shared them.
Speaking of big and delicious, Terry Strickland at Strickland Brothers Farm has some exceptional onions (far right) that they’ve grown at the farm. This Yellow Granex variety is the same one grown as Vidalia onions. I measured some at 4-inches across. Terry said that they sold out fast last year, so don’t miss them. The Albion strawberries (above) grown by Sean Lennon at Fitzgerald Fruit Farms have also been exceptional. This strawberry variety is my favorite. Three-inch long fruits aren’t super common but they are all still big and tasty!
********************
PESTS OF THE WEEK
It’s that time of year when I start seeing plant problems everywhere I look. Most are incidental and either easily ignored or fairly easily managed. Some are more problematic.
Leaf gall (pictured below) of Camellia sasanqua is present again this year. We have certainly had the cooler temperatures required for infection to occur. To manage this disease remove and destroy (burn or bag) diseased leaves before the lower leaf surface turns white. This practice will reduce the inoculum source for next year's infection. Do not leave infected leaves or branches on the ground after pruning because spores can be dispersed from them. Fungicide applications are seldom necessary and will only provide limited control.
I’ve seen powdery mildew on roses (pictured below right) and crape myrtles. It may be showing up on other ornamental trees and shrubs such as dogwood. This problem is one that some people may choose to ignore. Usually certain varieties of these ornamentals are more susceptible to powdery mildew and will get infected almost every year. Large trees are difficult to spray for most homeowners. If you have a prize rose that is infected you can spray to protect the new growth. The potential for infection diminishes as temperatures get above 80°F.


Below is what I believe are grape sawfly larvae, Erythraspides vitis, on muscadine leaves and their feeding damage. These larvae were pretty small-around ¼ inch long. If you have muscadines in your garden please be sure to check them for damage and also be sure to look on the underside of the leaves for larvae.
Apparently there has been very little research work done on this insect beyond confirmed records in limited locations. Either presence of this insect has been very isolated or it has come and gone unnoticed. Thanks to Ed Rocereta of the Warm Springs Winery for noticing it and giving the heads up on this pest.


********************
SMALL RUMINANTS
Fecal Egg Count Workshop
Dr. Niki Whitley is giving a fecal egg count workshop on June 27, 2017 at 6:00 PM. It will take place in the Upson County UGA Extension office located at 305 S. Hightower Street Suite 170, Thomaston, GA 30286. The seating is limited due to the number of available microscopes.
Please let me know if you want to attend by emailing scj24262@uga.edu or calling 706-977-0882.
The training will focus on identifying parasites, tracking heavy worm-carriers in the herd, understanding refugia, and using these tools in genetic selection. Participants are encouraged to bring samples from their herd. Directions on how to collect a fecal sample using a latex glove are below.
· Put on a clean glove. Apply a nickel size amount of water or water-based lubricant to index and middle fingers.
· Insert index and middle fingers into the rectum of the animal, one finger at a time. No need to go very deep. Spread fingers to allow air into the rectum. The air duplicates fullness in the rectum and a wave of muscular movement will often move feces out into your hand.
· Remove ~4 grams of fecal matter. A good sized adult pellet is about 1 gram.
· Peel the glove off your hand keeping the fecal sample encased within it.
· Squeeze as much air as possible out of the glove. Twist the wrist portion of the glove and fasten with a label (farm and animal ID) making sure the label sticks to itself, as it won’t stick to the glove. You can also twist and tie off the glove and label the glove itself with an indelible marker.
· Store the sample in the refrigerator until it can be analyzed (the sooner the better, but samples can be stored in the refrigerator for a week). If you are collecting many samples at one time, have a cooler with ice on hand to keep the samples cool until you can get them into a refrigerator.

NEXT UP FOR SMALL RUMNINANT PRODUCERS
Mr. Terrell Hollis of the Fort Valley State University Meat Technology Center will be speaking on the evening of July 20 at a small ruminant meeting. We will begin at 6:00-place still to be determined. But go ahead and get it on your schedule. After his visit here we will plan a trip to visit their facility in Fort Valley.
********************
FORAGES
GrassMasters
Steve Morgan, ANR Agent for Harris County and member of the UGA Forge Team, helps teach the GrassMasters training course. We are looking at possibly offering the program locally. The course focuses on the forages proven best for northeast Georgia and strategies for grazing, maintaining soil fertility and health, and managing pests.
Members of the UGA Forage Team and U.S. Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service staff members teach the classes. The cost for all seven weeks is $25, and the course is open to anyone interested in improving his or her knowledge of pastureland health or forage and hay production.
If you would be interested in attending the program please let me know by emailing me at scj24262@uga.edu.
Steve will also be speaking at the next Meriwether County Cattlemen’s meeting which is Thursday, May 11th. So if you have forage questions please join us for the evening. We will meet at the Meriwether Steak Co. at 4776 Nebula Rd, Warm Springs at 7:30.


DROUGHT
I’m already having conversations with folks about drought. According to the US Drought Monitor most of Meriwether County is still in a moderate drought (D1). Hopefully everyone in the county got rain on Thursday but in some places it was only ¼ inch. Right now the 3 month forecast is that we have an equal chance of less than, more than or the same amount of precipitation as normal. The expected trend though is for the drought to persist. So think hard about how you plan to manage your herds. I know some folks are buying hay as fast as it can be cut right now. The link to Dennis Hancock’s presentation from January is below on rotational grazing and options for stretching hay.
http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/Home/StateDroughtMonitor.aspx…
https://www.wcc.nrcs.usda.gov/…/…/drought/dmrpt-20170427.pdf
http://georgiaforages.caes.uga.edu/…/170110meriwethercograz…
********************
CATTLE
Meriwether County Cattlemen’s Association is selling raffle tickets for a Stihl MS251C Wood Boss Chainsaw with a retail value of $349.99. Raffle tickets are $10.00. To purchase tickets please contact Brian McDaniels (678-850-6640) or Emmett Collins (706-977-9819).
Lemmon Cattle Enterprises will be auctioning all of its registered Angus during a sale on May 27, 2017 at the farm at 16810 Woodbury Hwy, Woodbury, GA 30293. The sale begins at 10:00 AM.
UGA Calhoun HERD Sale is on Wednesday, May 31 at 12:30 PM at the NW GA Livestock Pavilion at 1282 Hwy 53 Spur, Calhoun. Offered will be approximately 100 heifers-Angus, Hereford, Simmental, SimAngus and Commercial. Videos will be available May 18 at www.ugabeef.com/programs
*********************
I hope everyone has a wonderful weekend. I will be spending this Saturday watching our 4-H Archery Team compete at Rock Eagle. The team includes Tristan Irvin, Hunter Pike and Jack and Michael Underwood. Coach Drew Pike has done a phenomenal job with the team as well as drumming up support from the community. I was disappointed to miss Chloe Dukes and Delia Rogers compete in the Shotgun Qualifier last Saturday because of the Keep Meriwether Beautiful cleanup day. Congratulations to Delia and her coaches, Terry Strickland and Shannon Dukes, for qualifying to attend the State Modified Trap Match!

Susan

Susan C James
Agriculture and Natural Resources Agent
UGA Extension-Meriwether County
706-672-4235 Office
706-977-0882 Mobile

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Volunteers thanked by KMB

Message from Jane Fryer, director of Keep Meriwether Beautiful: 
During this week of National Volunteer Week, I would like to thank you for the many things you do for Keep Meriwether Beautiful. Without all of your dedicated and valuable time that you spend on this project, KMB would not be successful. Thank you for your Service.
Jane L. Fryer
Keep Meriwether Beautiful
Meriwether County Development Authority
17234 Roosevelt Highway, Bldg. B
Greenville, Ga. 30222
J.Fryer@meriwethercountyga.gov
706/672-3467- phone
706/672-4465-fax

 

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Scholarship offered for environmental research

The Georgia Environmental Conference is offering graduate and undergraduate students the opportunity to win a $1,000 scholarship for their research on environmental issues.  Please see the attached flyer for details on how to apply.
 
Thanks,
 
Reggie
 
Reggie A. Taylor, EDFP
Community Development Specialist
USDA Rural Development
355 E. Hancock Ave
Athens, GA 30601-2775
Ph. 706-552-2557
Cell. 229-319-5542
Email: Reggie.Taylor@ga.usda.gov

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Agenda posted for Meriwether Board of

Commissioners meeting April 25

The agenda has been posted for this week's April 25 Meriwether Board of Commissioners meeting.

The meeting is scheduled for April 25, 2017 at 6:00 p.m. and will be held at the Administration Building located at 17234 Roosevelt Hwy. Bldg. B, Greenville, GA.

If you have questions or need assistance please contact Beverly Thomas at 706-672-3462. The meeting is open to the public.

AGENDA
MERIWETHER COUNTY BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS
April 25, 2017
6:00 P.M.


I.    CALL TO ORDER
    INVOCATION
    PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE
            
II.    ADOPT AGENDA
     
III.    MINUTES
1.    April 12, 2017 Regular Meeting 9:00 am
        
IV.    MUNICIPAL COMMENTS

V.    CONSTITUTIONAL OFFICER’S COMMENTS

VI.    DEPARTMENT HEAD COMMENTS 

VII.     PUBLIC HEARING

VIII.    OLD BUSINESS
1.    Appointment to the Zoning Board of Appeals
2.    Shaw Hankins
3.     Confirmation of award of bids for mowing at Lake Meriwether, Industrial Park,     and Airport
4.    Approval of Proposal for Architectural and Engineering Services for Fire     Department

IX.    NEW BUSINESS
1.    Award of bid for Culvert Replacement Project – Montgomery and Graham Roads
2.    Acceptance of Right-Of-Way Deed – Montgomery Culvert Project
3.    Confirmation of letter to One America changing Retirement plan to Mass Mutual

X.    REPORT FROM FINANCE DIRECTOR
1.    Finance Report

XI.    REPORT FROM COUNTY ADMINISTRATOR

XII.    REPORT FROM COUNTY COMMISSIONERS

XIII.    REPORT FROM COUNTY ATTORNEY

XIV.    PUBLIC COMMENT

XV.    EXECUTIVE SESSION
Legal
Personnel 
Real Estate 
Tax Matters

XVI.    FUTURE MEETINGS & NOTICES
    May 10, 2017 9:00 am
    May 23, 2017 4:30 pm Work Session
    May 23, 2017 6:00 pm

XVII.    ADJOURNMENT

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Committee working on Flint River Water Trail

Among items discussed at the Together in Meriwether tourism committee meeting Monday at the Meriwether Regional Visitor Information Center in Warm Springs was a new multi-county committee working on a Flint River Water Trail. The trail is focusing on the upper Flint River, the section from its headwaters southward to about Sprewell Bluff in Thomaston.

Do you love kayaking or canoeing? Do you have knowledge of the upper Flint River? Are you a Flint River property owner who might be willing to offer a rest stop area? 

The multi-county committee needs your help in developing a Flint River Water Trail with spots to enter and exit the river and rest stops, along with signage for boaters.

If you are interested in more information or helping the committee, email Meriwether's tourism representative on the committee at pflamingo@bellsouth.net for more information.

 

Together in Meriwether committee will meet again 9:30 a.m. May 23 at the Meriwether Regional Visitor Information Center in Warm Springs. For more information on Meriwether tourism activities contact Carolyn McKinley at meriwetherchamber@windstream.net

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UGA Extension Meriwether County ANR E-Newsletter
April 15, 2017

WELCOME BACK ANGIE
Angie Ledford should be returning to the office for the morning of April 17th. If you get the chance please stop by and welcome her back from her extended absence.
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PEST OF THE WEEK-SWD
Spotted wing drosophila (Drosophila suzukii) entered the continental US in 2008 in California. It had been known as a pest in Hawaii since 1980. From California it moved into Oregon and Washington by 2009. That same year it was first found in Florida. By 2010 it was found by personnel at the USDA lab outside of Charleston, SC and then a week later in traps placed at Lexington County, SC farms by Clemson Extension. It was also found in 2010 in Georgia.
So what’s the big deal about this pest? Unfortunately, quite a lot. Most drosophilid female flies use over-ripe or damaged fruits as a site to lay eggs. Hatched larvae will tunnel and feed on the fruit, pupate and then emerge as adults from the fruit. SWD goes through the same life cycle but the female adults prefer ripe and undamaged fruit still on the plant-basically what we like to eat! The female adult has an ovipositor that looks like a small saw that enables her to slice through the skins of fruits. Before the introduction of this pest it was not typical to make insecticide applications to a lot of the small fruits that we grow in the southern states. Those fruits, in order of SWD preference are raspberry, blackberry, strawberry, blueberry and then basically any other soft-skinned fruits. The first found SWD larva in a fruit in SC was in a strawberry in 2011.
During 2013, while still working for Clemson Extension, I spent the summer collecting fruits from farms, home gardens and natural areas, to see if SWD would emerge from them. Fruits from which the flies emerged were blackberry, blueberry, figs, muscadines (predominantly wet scar varieties) and pokeberry. I also found fruits of beautyberry (Callicarpa americana) and pomegranates that had eggs inserted in them but apparently the larvae were not able to survive feeding on these fruits since no pupae were formed and no adults emerged. Adults have been able to overwinter successfully in the areas where I have done trapping-here and in SC. So populations can build back up pretty quickly if fruits are available. Multiple generations can occur during the growing season. In Japan they have been documented as having up to 13 generations per year.
It is now common practice to use insecticides for raspberry, blackberry, strawberry, blueberry and muscadine crops where SWD has been found. The fresh fruit market has a zero tolerance for larvae so a shipment of infested fruit can be totally rejected by a buyer even if the infestation is very limited-hence the insecticide use. (I can say from experience that folks who prefer organic produce will tolerate larvae better than they will pesticides). There are only a few pesticides that can be used and they all restrict the amount applied per season. So it can be difficult for growers to provide protection all season long. When I left SC in 2015 to move here SWD was well under control in most fruits. This year it was found again in strawberries-the first small fruit of the year. The thought is that due to the mild winter mated females were just waiting for a good location to lay eggs. Strawberries began bearing early also due to a mild winter so they made the perfect spot. Other fruits as they come into production may also be targeted. Home gardeners should be aware. One of the most effective insecticides for SWD is spinosad, which is derived from the soil bacterium, Saccharopolyspora spinosa. Spinosad products, such as Entrust, are OMRI listed which means they have been reviewed and approved for organic production. In the related images are, from left to right: female SWD adult showing saw-like ovipositor; male SWD showing spots on wings that give the insect its common name and SWD and Zaprionus indianus (another invasive drosophilid) adults on a blackberry.


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MUSCADINES
Dr. Cain Hickey, the new UGA viticulturist, is having a Muscadine Round Table on May 31 at the Still Pond Winery in Arlington, GA (1575 Still Pond Road). The purpose of the meeting is to gather information about concerns and issues in muscadine and muscadine wine production that will help direct research efforts. If you are interested in attending please let me know by emailing me at scj24262@uga.edu.
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Marketing, Management, Feasibility Projects
UGA students in the Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics are looking for businesses/people to partner with for projects in these areas of interest: marketing plan; management plan or feasibility study. If you are interested please email me at scj24262@uga.edu and I will send you their application form.
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FORAGES
Steve Morgan, ANR Agent for Harris County and member of the UGA Forge Team, helps teach the GrassMasters training course. We are looking at possibly offering the program locally. The course focuses on the forages proven best for northeast Georgia and strategies for grazing, maintaining soil fertility and health, and managing pests.
Members of the UGA Forage Team and U.S. Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service staff members teach the classes. The cost for all seven weeks is $25, and the course is open to anyone interested in improving his or her knowledge of pastureland health or forage and hay production.
If you would be interested in attending the program please let me know by emailing me at scj24262@uga.edu.
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PRIVATE PESTICIDE APLLICATOR LICENSING
EPA has finally made the changes that we have been anticipating regarding its revision of the Certification of Pesticide Applicator Rule. 
As a result UGA Extension pesticide training fees, testing, and credits for private pesticide applicators will change May 1, 2017.
Major changes in Georgia’s program based on the EPA rule change are as follows:
Recertification credits: Pesticide applicators were required to attain three hours of continuing education credit every five years. In the future, they will need to attain five hours every five years. This rule needs to be made official within the regulations of the Georgia Department of Agriculture, so it will not take effect until the department updates its rules.
New emphasis on safety: All future workshops and field days offering continuing credits for the pesticide licensure will include a section on pesticide safety. This section must take up 10 to 15 minutes of the workshop or field day.
Online course fees: In order to cover the costs of instruction, new materials and trainings, online courses will cost $25, which will partially support the UGA Extension Pesticide Education Program. The course is currently free.
Online training: In the past, most training has taken place in county Extension offices. The new training will be taken online. Testing is done at the end of each section. A passing score is required to proceed to the next section.
Testing: Trainees now take about two hours to complete the course and certification test. Under the new program, it will take four to five hours to complete. However, individuals can take a break and return to the online course as needed.
Temporary licensure: Currently, farmers can get a temporary license upon completing the exam and the license application with their agent. This will continue in the new program.
To read more about the changes please visit:
http://www.caes.uga.edu/newswire/story.html…
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KEEP MERIWETHER BEAUTIFUL CLEAN UP DAY
Saturday, April 22nd 8:00 AM-4:00 PM
The clean-up day is almost here. Help Keep Meriwether Beautiful by cleaning up trash around your home or business on this day. Be sure to get your team together and registered so you can win awards! We have registration forms in the hall outside our office.
Locations for dumpsters: Alvaton Fire Station, Durand Fire Station, Gay Fire Station, Luthersville City Hall, Rocky Mount Store, St. Marks Community Building, Warm Springs Police Department, behind the Probation Department in Greenville, at the old mill site on Washington Street in Manchester, and on Dromedary Street in Woodbury. Only bags of trash may be placed in the dumpsters. All furniture, mattresses and other large items are to be placed on the ground beside the dumpsters not in them. We are recommending that folks contact Mr. Paul Haney at 770-977-9732 is they need to dispose of appliances.
Absolutely no tires will be accepted at the dumpster locations. They must be unmounted and taken to the Meriwether County Public Works Department at 689 County Farm Road in Greenville. Only Meriwether County residents may dispose of tires. Public Works staff will be on hand to help.
For more information please contact Jane Fryer at j.fryer@meriwethercountyga.gov or 706-672-3467.
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CATTLE
Meriwether County Cattlemen’s Association is selling raffle tickets for a Stihl MS251C Wood Boss Chainsaw with a retail value of $349.99. Raffle tickets are $10.00. To purchase tickets please contact Brian McDaniels (678-850-6640) or Emmett Collins (706-977-9819).
Please remember in May we start meeting on the second Thursday of the month at the Meriwether Steak Co. in Warm Springs. Our meeting is May 11 at 7:30. Steve Morgan, ANR Agent for Harris County and member of the UGA Forage Team will be speaking.
Lemmon Cattle Enterprises will be auctioning all of its registered Angus during a sale on May 27, 2017 at the farm at 16810 Woodbury Hwy, Woodbury, GA 30293. The sale begins at 10:00 AM.
UGA Tifton HERD Sale is on Tuesday, April 18 at 12:30 PM at the Tifton Bull Evaluation Center in Irwinville. Offered are 110 outstanding bred registered and commercial heifers. Please visit: http://ugabeef.com/…/18th-annual-tifton-herd-sale-april-18…/
UGA Calhoun HERD Sale is on Wednesday, May 31 at 12:30 PM at the NW GA Livestock Pavilion at 1282 Hwy 53 Spur, Calhoun. Offered will be approximately 100 heifers-Angus, Hereford, Simmental, SimAngus and Commercial. Videos will be available May 18 at www.ugabeef.com/programs
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LOCAL MARKET
Flowers, Vegetable and Other Plants
I think the chance of a frost is finally over. I did get reports last weekend of temperatures in the thirties but the forecast for the week only has lows in the fifties. So those of you who have been patiently waiting to plant your summer annuals and the vegetable garden should get busy. There are businesses with plants for sale in just about every part of the county. Smith Hardware in Luthersville, Sentry Hardware in Greenville, Hudson’s in Woodbury and Manchester Farm and Garden and Taylor-Foster in Manchester all offer a variety of plants.
Starting next weekend there will be a new nursery, Triple B Gardens (owners Rachel and Gordon Craighton), in Warm Springs at the corner of Roosevelt and Durand Highways. On Saturday, April 22 they will be open from 9-6 and on Sunday April 23 from 12:30-4. While they have a special focus on the 3 B's - Birds (hummingbirds in particular), Bees, and Butterflies, they offer something for every gardener.
You can learn more about them by visiting:
https://www.triplebgardens.com/
https://www.facebook.com/triplebgardens/

Strawberries are here!
Fitzgerald Fruit Farms (Greenville and Woodbury area)
The retail shed at 3355 Imlac Road is open and strawberry ice cream will be available as well as strawberries. https://www.fitzgeraldfruitfarms.com/
https://www.facebook.com/thepeachshed/
Strickland Brothers Farm (Durand and Pine Mountain area)
The strawberry and vegetable field is at the crossroad of Chipley Hwy and John Wallace Road. They are open Mon-Sat. You can contact Terry at 706-881-2414 or you can visit: https://www.facebook.com/Stricklands-Garden-233167170487274/
Sweet Berry Orchard (Lone Oak and Luthersville area)
Leighanne and Tom Hagan have varieties of strawberries for sale. They are located at 6659 Lone Oak Road. You can visit them on Facebook to see when they are ready for u-pick: https://www.facebook.com/TOMandLEIGHANNE/
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I hope everyone has a wonderful weekend,
Susan
Susan C James
Agriculture and Natural Resources Agent
UGA Extension-Meriwether County
706-672-4235 Office
706-977-0882 Mobile

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Meriwether County needs volunteer 'champions' 

Meriwether County needs volunteer 'champions' to help with Summer Camp 2017. See the flyers below for information.

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UGA Extension Meriwether County ANR E-Newsletter
April 5, 2017

PESTS AND IPM
It’s about time to start up the “Pest of the Week” segment but first I want to write about Integrated Pest Management (IPM). Most of my education and research experience has involved IPM. A typical definition of IPM is the one below from the University of California:
IPM is an ecosystem-based strategy that focuses on long-term prevention of pests or their damage through a combination of techniques such as biological control, habitat manipulation, modification of cultural practices, and use of resistant varieties. Pesticides are used only after monitoring indicates they are needed according to established guidelines, and treatments are made with the goal of removing only the target organism. Pest control materials are selected and applied in a manner that minimizes risks to human health, beneficial and non-target organisms, and the environment.
What that means is that producers need to know their farm environment including differences in fields; know the crop or livestock varieties that do best in that environment; know the other organisms sharing that environment; know the best management practices for the crop or livestock chosen; know the most common pests; be able to accurately identify them; know how best to scout or monitor for them; know the biological and cultural management practices for them as well as recommended pesticides; and know the toxicity variances of those pesticides and use the least toxic when possible.
As mentioned above, correctly identifying a pest is crucial to IPM but it should always be done whether practicing IPM or not. Never assume, never guess. One of our main jobs as extension agents is to help people correctly identify pests. If we can’t do it we find the specialist who can. As part of my education I have taken multiple courses in taxonomy which is the science of identifying and naming organisms. I’ve studied plant taxonomy, grass taxonomy, arthropod/insect taxonomy and mycology or the taxonomy of fungi. All of these subjects are necessary to have the general knowledge to identify crop and animal (including human) pests.
Some pests are common enough that most people would recognize them, such as a cockroach. But there are about eleven species of cockroaches to be found in Georgia and their biology differs. The difference in biology means there will be different best management practices for those species. And that leads to the real point of this article. It is not enough to just identify a pest. To be successful at managing a pest with the least inputs you must also know and understand the biology of the pest. That includes knowing the life cycle as it occurs in your location, feeding habits which include understanding the anatomical structures used for feeding, the damaging stages of development, if reproduction is sexual or asexual, overwintering habits, numbers of generations, ability to move, etc.
I came across a situation last week where a grower had correctly identified one pest in a crop but it was not the pest that had caused the damage he was most upset about. Because he saw the one pest but not the other he assumed incorrectly that it was the culprit. If he had understood the biology (practiced IPM) of the pest that he saw he would have known that it was not the culprit. Another point I’d like to make is that knee-jerk reactions to pests or damage should be avoided. Too many people are guilty of doing just that. All crops can tolerate damage and a lot of research has gone into determining the economic threshold for certain pests and their damage in certain crops. For example, in field corn at the seedling stage with armyworm damage, the recommendation in Georgia is to treat when 25% of the seedlings have damage. In this case there is no need to use a pesticide until ¼ of the crop has been impacted. You do not treat just because you saw an armyworm; you monitor to assess what, if any, damage has occurred. If there is damage you measure the amount. Then you decide whether or not a treatment is called for. Many plant crops can actually withstand 10-30% damage before yield is impacted. One major impact that is the result of over application of pesticides is resistance. We have situations with both plant crops and livestock where the pesticides for certain pests are no longer effective. And there is no new pesticide chemistry being discovered to replace those. So some of the benefits for practicing IPM is saving the efficacy of pesticides as well as saving money.
The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) are presently under court orders to reassess the environmental impact of 9 commonly used pesticides. Some of these pesticides have come under fire because they have shown up in the critical habitats of endangered species. The main reason that they show up in these off-site locations is most likely due to incorrect or illegal uses. If you do not apply a pesticide according to its label you have broken the law! Pesticide manufacturers pay billions of dollars to have their products registered and a big portion of that money goes into determining the impact on non-target organisms. All pesticide labels have an “Environmental Hazards” section which explains what non-target organisms or their habitats are especially sensitive to that product. Besides protecting endangered species, an emphasis is also being placed on pollinator species which includes our native bees as well as the introduced honey bee. If the on-going assessment of pesticides on non-target organisms continues to confirm that pesticides are showing up where they shouldn’t be, chances are that those pesticides will either be more difficult to acquire or will lose their label. And the real people to blame will not be the manufacturers but the applicators using them unlawfully. So please remember to read the label before you even purchase a pesticide, read it again before you use it and then follow it. Because if you don’t you may find in the near future that the pesticide is no longer available.
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DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES-ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION DIVISION
NOTICE OF AVAILABILITY OF NEW DRAFTS OF REGIONAL WATER PLANS FOR PUBLIC REVIEW AND COMMENT
Regional Water Planning Councils have developed updated drafts of Regional Water Plans that are available for public review and comment now through May 19, 2017. 
Reports from the councils address surface and ground water availability, water uses, water quality, nutrient modeling, future use modeling and other topics. Most important are the water management practices recommended by the councils. There are three high priority practices recommended for the Upper Flint update: 1) Continue to improve the agricultural water withdrawal metering program 2) Evaluate storage options in the Upper Flint Region that can provide for supply and flow augmentation in dry periods and 3) Increase education directed toward improving water quality.
With regards to the first practice, on December 1, 2016 the Georgia Environmental Protection Division (EPD) agency took over regulation of the metering program that was in place and under the Georgia Soil and Water Conservation Commission. According to the metering program all agricultural irrigation wells and pumps must have a measurement device installed. And now any irrigation point that pumps more than 100,000 gallons per day (70 gallons per minute) is required to also have an EPD permit. These changes are partially being implemented due to allegations by the state of Florida that Georgia farmers were not in compliance with water usage requirements. The allegations were directed at Southwest Georgia farmers but everyone using water at the set volume needs to be in compliance. Other high volume users are golf courses.
For the third practice, everyone should be aware of local and state-wide water uses. They should also be aware of water quality and what impacts that quality. If you read the Upper Flint River Plan (and I hope everyone will look at it) pay attention to the Summary of Impaired Waters in the Upper Flint on page 3-13. The Flint River has some definite issues. One of the focuses for Meriwether County for revenue is tourism and the Flint River is being looked at as a place of interest for tourists. In that case everyone in Meriwether County needs to be involved in addressing, supporting and implementing practices to improve the Flint River’s water quality.
The draft updated Regional Water Plans may be viewed at http://epd.georgia.gov/draft-regional-water-plans. Meriwether County is in the Upper Flint region. Instructions for submitting comments are also included on the website. Written comments are welcomed, and should be received by close of business on May 19, 2017. Comments should be submitted via the website so that EPD may properly capture and convey all comments received on behalf of the Regional Water Planning Councils. Comments may also be sent via regular mail addressed to: Georgia EPD, Attn: Jennifer Welte, Watershed Protection Branch, 2 MLK, Jr. Dr. S.W., Suite 1152, Atlanta, GA 30334.
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SMALL FRUITS
The Southern Region Small Fruit Consortium sent out the second issue of its newsletter this week. This organization started in 1999 with the mission of developing a relationship between land-grant universities as well as with industry representatives. Each university member contributes $35,000 annually that goes towards research projects involving small fruit production. The consortium also provides funding for extension agent training every year. This year the training focused on new varieties being developed and coming to market of blackberries, blueberries, muscadines, table grapes and strawberries.
Production guides are provided by the consortium as well as IPM guides. Anyone can access the information at their website: http://www.smallfruits.org/
This issue has articles on a new muscadine variety, Paulk, released by UGA and on blackberry diseases, cane/leaf rust and orange rust, partly written by Phil Brannen, UGA Plant Pathologist. To access the newsletter to read these articles and more please visit: http://www.smallfruits.org/Newsletter/Vol17-Issue2.pdf
To subscribe to an electronic notification service of new Small Fruit News issues on the web, send your e-mail address to brendaw@uga.edu.
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FORAGES
The March issue of the UGA Forage Extension Team Newsletter is available on-line now. It includes articles on seeding warm season perennials, moldy hay and hay as a cause of burning barns.
These articles are posted on the UGA Forage Extension Team Blog at http://blog.extension.uga.edu/forageteam/.
Everything you want to know about forages in Georgia can be found at: http://extension.uga.edu/agriculture/forages/
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CATTLE
Meriwether County Cattlemen’s Monthly Meeting
We will meet for the last time at Blackbird Café in Woodbury at 7:30 PM. Our sponsor is Georgia Deer Farm and Agri-center at 850 Hwy 27 North Roopville, Georgia, 30170.
Lemmon Cattle Enterprises will be auctioning all of its registered Angus during a sale on May 27, 2017 at the farm at 16810 Woodbury Hwy, Woodbury, GA 30293.
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SMALL RUMINANTS
The monthly report for the National Scrapie Eradication Program for February 2017 is now available. PDF Monthly Report
No classical scrapie cases have been reported in sheep or goats in FY 2017. The last classical case was reported in April 2016.
To learn more about scrapie, the disease, and the national scrapie eradication program, please visit the A HIS VS Scrapie Website and www.eradicatescrapie.org.
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FARM SERVICE AGENCY
The Georgia March Newsletter is now available on-line:
https://www.fsa.usda.gov/…/Ge…/newsletters/1300020171403.pdf
If you are interested in becoming organically certified FSA can help with up to 75% of the cost. Check it out!
2017 Acreage Reporting Dates
In order to comply with FSA program eligibility requirements, all producers are encouraged to visit their local County FSA office to file an accurate crop certification report by the applicable deadline. The following acreage reporting dates are applicable:
May 15, 2017 Sweet Corn (Planted 8/26-5/15), Tomatoes (Planted 8/16-4/5)
July 15, 2017 All other Crops
August 15, 2017 Tomatoes (Planted 7/1-8/15)
Commodity Loan Rates for 2017 are available by state and county here:
https://www.fsa.usda.gov/…/price…/commodity-loan-rates/index
Livestock Forage Payments as of March 2, 2017 for Georgia numbered 25,546 for a total of $118,773,223.
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PLANT SALE
Troup County Master Gardener Annual Plant Sale
April 22, 2017 from 8:00 AM-4:00 PM
Refresh the garden and landscape. Select from master gardener grown annuals, perennials, shrubs, fruits and vegetables-all reasonably priced! Browse our rare and unusual plants, 2017 new introductions and unique gifts. Master gardeners will be available to offer expert advice and suggestions. Admission and parking-FREE! Located at the Ag Center, Vulcan Materials Rd. and HWY 27 Hamilton Rd, LaGrange GA.
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KEEP MERIWETHER BEAUTIFUL CLEAN UP DAY
Saturday, April 22nd 8:00 AM-4:00 PM
The clean-up day is almost here. Help Keep Meriwether Beautiful by cleaning up trash around your home or business on this day. Be sure to get your team together and registered so you can win awards! We have registration forms in the hall outside our office.
Locations for dumpsters: Alvaton Fire Station, Durand Fire Station, Gay Fire Station, Luthersville City Hall, Rocky Mount Store, St. Marks Community Building, Warm Springs Police Department, behind the Probation Department in Greenville, at the old mill site on Washington Street in Manchester, and on Dromedary Street in Woodbury. Only bags of trash may be placed in the dumpsters. All furniture, mattresses and other large items are to be placed on the ground beside the dumpsters not in them.
Absolutely no tires will be accepted at the dumpster locations. They must be unmounted and taken to the Meriwether County Public Works Department at 689 County Farm Road in Greenville. Only Meriwether County residents may dispose of tires. Public Works staff will be on hand to help.
For more information please contact Jane Fryer at j.fryer@meriwethercountyga.gov or 706-672-3467.
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Water Well Trust
The Water Well Trust, the only national nonprofit helping low income Americans get access to a clean, safe water supply, has announced that it is expanding from fourteen to fifteen the number of Georgia counties eligible to receive assistance for drilling a new water well or rehabilitate an existing well. Meriwether County is now included.
USDA grant monies will provide long-term, low-interest loans to applicants seeking new or improved water wells.
To be eligible to receive a WWT loan, applicants must be the owner and occupant of the home as their primary residence. In addition, the applicant’s household income must not exceed 100% of the median non-metropolitan household income for the state in which the applicant resides. The 2016 Non-Metropolitan median household income for Georgia is $45,300. The income criteria apply to both the applicant and all other occupants of the home.
Prospective applicants can download the application form and instruction letter from the website under “Apply” at the top of the home page: https://www.waterwelltrust.org/
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LOCAL MARKET
Strawberries are here!
Fitzgerald Fruit Farms (Greenville and Woodbury area)
The retail shed at 3355 Imlac Road is open and strawberry ice cream will be available as well as strawberries. https://www.fitzgeraldfruitfarms.com/
https://www.facebook.com/thepeachshed/
Strickland Brothers Farm (Durand and Pine Mountain area)
The strawberry and vegetable field is at the crossroad of Chipley Hwy and John Wallace Road. They are open Mon-Sat. You can contact Terry at 706-881-2414 or you can visit: https://www.facebook.com/Stricklands-Garden-233167170487274/
Sweet Berry Orchard (Lone Oak and Luthersville area)
Leighanne and Tom Hagan have varieties of strawberries for sale. They are located at 6659 Lone Oak Road. You can visit them on Facebook to see when they are ready for u-pick: https://www.facebook.com/TOMandLEIGHANNE/
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LOCAL EVENTS
Warm Springs Spring Fling Festival
April 8 10:00 AM-6:00 PM and April 9 10:00 AM-5:00 PM
The 19th Annual Spring Fling will be taking place in downtown Warm Springs this coming weekend. Featured will be arts, crafts, hobbies, food vendors, entertainment through the day, kiddie train rides, fruit and vegetable stand, a hands-on craft booth for children, karaoke contest, and much more! No admission fee. For additional information, contact the Regional Visitors Information Center at 706-655-3322.
Open Air Meriwether
April 28-29
This event is a plein air painting experience with 20 professional artists painting at Meriwether County locations. A reception is Sunday, April 30 from 2-5 p.m. at Artisans on the Square, located in Hill Brothers Corner, Court Square in Greenville, GA with a wet painting exhibition and sale.
For more information please visit: www.facebook.com/artisansonthesquare or www.facebook.com/meriwethertourism or call 404-386-1328
Sponsored by Arts Meriwether and Artisans on the Square
Country Swing Dance
April 29 7:00-10:00 PM
At QC Arena (Quercus Farm)
805 Flat Shoals Road in Gay, GA
The dance will be held in the 52,000 square foot arena. Music will be provided by Swing South, Georgia's premier Texas Swing Band. Proceeds benefit the Friends of the J. Joel Edwards Public Library. Tickets are available at the Library in Zebulon, Novel Experience Bookstore in Zebulon and at the Q-C Arena. Admission is $10.00 per person.
For more information please visit: http://www.friendsofthejjoeledwardspubliclibrary.com or call 770-584-3094.
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Have a great rest of the week!
Susan
Susan C James
Agriculture and Natural Resources Agent
UGA Extension-Meriwether County
706-672-4235 Office
706-977-0882 Mobile

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Meriwether County Schools closed

Wed., April 5 due to weather risk

Posted April 4, 2017

Meriwether Schools Closed Wed., April 5 Due to Weather Risk -- From Meriwether County E911 / EMA as of 8:30 p.m. Tues: After a briefing from the National Weather Service at 4 p.m. Tues. we learned that tomorrow's weather events have a serious potential we haven't seen in this area in quite some time. The potential weather models they presented show a wide range of severity. Basically precipitation will start around daybreak and continue throughout the day with potential for severe weather greatest around 9 a.m., calming throughout the day but ramping up again in the afternoon through early evening and continue out of West Central Ga. The National Weather Service is stating this system has greater potential then the storms that Georgia experienced in January. We are expecting further word from the National Weather Service here in a little while and we will keep you updated as we receive information.

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Meet Meriwether Recreation Board members April 27

Meriwether County Recreation Board invites you to meet the members at a Town Hall Meeting 6:30 p.m. April 27 at Greenville Old Middle School Auditorium.

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Job Opening: Meriwether County Animal Control Director

Posted March 28, 2017

Applications will be accepted for the position of Animal Control Director until filled. Applications are available at the Meriwether County Board of Commissioners /Administration office located at 17234 Roosevelt Hwy. Bldg. B, Greenville, GA 30222. NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE. Employer will conduct a pre-employment screen. Meriwether County is an Equal Opportunity Employer.
ANIMAL CONTROL DIRECTOR – will provide leadership in controlling stray, uncontrolled, or abused dogs and cats from undesirable conditions. This includes capture, examination, basic medical treatment, housing, return to owners or placement of animal with new owners. This position is responsible for reports to the county leadership, state agencies, and to provide public information about animal welfare, animal control laws and regulations. This position is responsible for supervision of animal control officers and their training as well as Department Budgeting. A complete Job Description can be viewed online at meriwethercountyga.gov or at the Administration Building. View job description and download at https://drive.google.com/…/0BzW4KGjS8jV0U1VsajBTWWdpZ0U/view

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Confirmed H7, Presumptive Low Pathogenic

Avian Influenza in a commercial flock in Georgia
 

Posted March 27, 2017 
“A flock of chickens at a commercial poultry breeding operation located in Chattooga County has tested positive for H7, presumptive low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI).  This is the first confirmation of avian influenza in domestic poultry in Georgia.  Avian influenza does not pose a risk to the food supply, and no affected animals entered the food chain. The risk of human infection with avian influenza during poultry outbreaks is very low. 
 
The virus was identified during routine pre-sale screening for the commercial facility and was confirmed as H7 avian influenza by the USDA National Veterinary Services Laboratory (NVSL) in Ames, Iowa.   As a precaution the affected flock has been depopulated. Officials are testing and monitoring other flocks within the surveillance area and no other flocks have tested positive or experienced any clinical sign”.
 
For more information please read the rest of the attached press release form the Georgia Department of Agriculture. And please continue to safe guard your backyard flocks.  
 
Please report any of your birds that suddenly become sick or die to the AI hotline (770-766-6850; aihotline@gapoultrylab.org), or to the state veterinarian’s office (855-491-1432).
Information on avian influenza and biosecurity can be found at the UGA Avian Flu website http://extension.uga.edu/topics/poultry/avian-flu/
 
Thank you,
Susan
 
Susan C James
Agriculture and Natural Resources Agent
UGA Extension-Meriwether County
706-672-4235 Office
706-977-0882 Mobile

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UGA Extension Meriwether County ANR E-Newsletter
March 25, 2017


BELOW FREEZING TEMPERATURES LAST WEEK
I didn’t get the chance this past weekend to write about the freeze we experienced last week in Meriwether County. Temperatures went as low as 21-22°F on Thursday morning after lows of 27°-28°F the night before. Peaches in full bloom were hit the hardest but for our biggest peach producer that was only about 15% of his trees. Those trees won’t produce a peach crop this year. But the trees that were in partial bloom and those that hadn’t budded out yet will hopefully produce a good crop.
Strawberries that were protected by row covers did well and those farms will be open for u-pick this weekend-see Local Market listings below.
Greg Lloyd, news team anchor, and producer, Jolyn Hannah, from WRLB in Columbus visited on Tuesday and spoke with Sean Lennon and me about the impact of the freeze on peaches and strawberries. The piece aired on Wednesday morning but it can be viewed by visiting:
http://wrbl.com/…/meriwether-county-peach-strawberry-crops…/
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THANK YOU!
I want to thank a number of people for their support of the 4-H Shotgun and Archery clubs but a special thank you goes to the Meriwether County Cattlemen’s Association. Members voted to donate over $400.00 to buy a desperately needed new archery target. Individuals who also donated to the clubs are Nina Lemmon, Daniel Beckham, Wayne Strickland and Lee Goggins. Businesses that donated to the clubs are the Alvaton Food Mart and the NAPA Auto Store in Greenville.
We really appreciate the support!
CATTLE
2017 GCA Convention and Georgia Beef Expo
March 29th-April 1st
Sponsored by the Georgia Cattlemen's Association
The conference will take place at the Georgia National Fair and Agricenter at 401 Larry Walker Parkway in Perry, GA.
The Georgia Cattlemen's Association Annual Convention and the Georgia Beef Expo, promote the beef cattle industry in Georgia. With a variety of cattle breeds on display, several cattle sales, trade show with vendors, and ample educational information, this promises to be a worthwhile activity for the beef cattle enthusiast.
The Georgia Beef Expo admission is free for spectators but there is a registration fee charged for the Convention.
For further information, contact the Georgia Cattlemen's Association office at (478) 474-6560. For a detailed schedule visit their Web-site www.gabeef.org/gca
Lemmon Cattle Enterprises will be auctioning all of its registered Angus during a sale on May 27, 2017 at the farm at 16810 Woodbury Hwy, Woodbury, GA 30293.
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LOCAL MARKET
Strawberries are here!
Fitzgerald Fruit Farms (Greenville and Woodbury area)
The retail shed at 3355 Imlac Road is open and strawberry ice cream will be available as well as strawberries. https://www.fitzgeraldfruitfarms.com/
Strickland Brothers Farm (Durand and Pine Mountain area)
The strawberry and vegetable field is at the crossroad of Chipley Hwy and John Wallace Road. They are open Mon-Sat. You can contact Terry at 706-881-2414.
Sweet Berry Orchard (Lone Oak and Luthersville area)
Leighanne and Tom Hagan have varieties of strawberries for sale. They are located at 6659 Lone Oak Road. You can visit them on Facebook to see when they are ready for u-pick: https://www.facebook.com/TOMandLEIGHANNE/
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POULTRY and AVIAN INFLUENZA UPDATE
The order of March 16, 2017 regarding movement of poultry in Georgia is still in effect until further notice. The information below is from Robert M. Cobb, Jr., DVM, State Veterinarian:
Avian Influenza (HPAI or LPAI) has NOT been found in Georgia poultry.
This temporary suspension prohibits the concentration, collection, or assembly of poultry and poultry products of all types from one or more premises for purposes of sale, exhibition, show, swap or meet. Reducing the assembly and commingling of poultry is the most effective way to practice strict biosecurity measures in our state.
The suspension includes all live poultry and poultry products. The definition of poultry and poultry products can be found in Georgia Department of Agriculture Rule 40-13-2-.15 (7) at http://rules.sos.state.ga.us/GAC/40-13-2-.15.
The suspension does not restrict importation of poultry or poultry products provided all Georgia import requirements are met prior to importation. You may find Interstate Movement Health Requirements in Georgia Department of Agriculture Rule 40-2-13 at http://rules.sos.state.ga.us/GAC/40-13-2-.15. The suspension does not restrict out–of–state export of poultry and poultry products. All exports must meet the requirements of the state or country of destination.
The suspension does not affect private sales of poultry and poultry products.
Shipments of eggs or baby chicks from National Poultry Improvement Plan (NPIP) Avian Influenza (AI) Clean facilities directly to approved Georgia facilities for sale to the public are not affected by this suspension. Biosecurity measures and information should be in place and in practice at approved facilities.
Eggs and baby chicks offered for sale that do not come from NPIP AI Clean facilities to the point of sale and/or eggs and baby chicks that move from an NPIP AI Clean facility directly to an unapproved facility and then are offered for resale are suspended temporarily.
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WHAT’S HAPPENING ELSEWHERE IN MERIWETHER
*Charlotte’s Web by Serenbe Playhouse
Saturday, April 1st 11:00 AM
Admission: $5.00 for children under 12; $10.00 for 12 and older
To purchase tickets, please visit:
http://www.serenbeplayhouse.com/shows-events/special-events
Quercus Farms
371 Quercus Farm Road
Gay, GA 30218
Keep Meriwether Beautiful Clean Up Day
Volunteers Needed!
Saturday, April 22nd 8:00 AM-4:00 PM
It’s time to start signing up again! Help Keep Meriwether Beautiful by cleaning up trash around your home or business on this day. For more information please contact Jane Fryer at j.fryer@meriwethercountyga.gov or 706-672-3467.
Have a great rest of the weekend!
Susan

Susan C James
Agriculture and Natural Resources Agent
UGA Extension-Meriwether County
706-672-4235 Office
706-977-0882 Mobile

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Water Well Trust expands water well projects to

15 Georgia counties including Meriwether
 

Posted March 22, 2017
WASHINGTON, D.C. -- The Water Well Trust, the only national nonprofit helping low income Americans get access to a clean, safe water supply, has announced that it is expanding from fourteen to fifteen the number of Georgia counties eligible to receive assistance for drilling a new water well or rehabilitate an existing well.

In 2015, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) awarded a $140,000 matching grant to the Water Well Trust (WWT) for a project to increase potable water availability to households in fourteen rural Georgia counties, including Colquitt, Hancock, Hart, Jefferson, Jones, Macon, Monroe, Murray, Worth, Grady, Twiggs, Warren, Washington and Wilcox. The WWT has expanded eligibility to include Meriwether county.
The USDA grant monies will provide long-term, low-interest loans to applicants seeking new or improved water wells in the 15-county area, including several families that have been on a waiting list since 2012.
To be eligible to receive a WWT loan, applicants must be the owner and occupant of the home as their primary residence. In addition, the applicant’s household income must not exceed 100% of the median non-metropolitan household income for the state in which the applicant resides. The 2016 Non-Metropolitan median household income for Georgia is $45,300. The income criteria apply to both the applicant and all other occupants of the home.
The Water Well Trust is working with the Georgia Department of Community Affairs, Georgia Environmental Finance Authority, the Georgia USDA office and county administrators in each designated county to notify potential beneficiaries of the program.
Prospective applicants can download the application form and instruction letter from the Water Well Trust website at waterwelltrust.org under “Apply” at the top of the home page.
The Water Systems Council established the Water Well Trust in 2010 to provide clean, sanitary drinking water to Americans who lack access to a reliable water supply and to construct and document small community water systems using water wells to demonstrate that these systems are more economical.
For more information, visit waterwellltrust.org.
# # #
Contact:
Margaret Martens, Program Director
Water Well Trust
mmartens@watersystemscouncil.org
202-625-4387

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Meriwether Extension Office seeking full-time educator

Meriwether County Extension Office has an opening for a full-time, benefits eligible 4-H Educator. For application details see the flyer below:

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Meriwether Extension has several upcoming events

Here is the Meriwether Extension newsletter for Feb. 26, including several registration forms for upcoming events:

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Request issued for bid proposal --

mowing and grounds maintenance

Posted Feb. 22, 2017


Meriwether County is accepting bids for mowing and grounds maintenance at Lake Meriwether Park, Meriwether County Airport, and the Meriwether County Industrial Park. These three projects will be bid individually for each location.
Please email the County Administrator at t.gay@meriwethercountyga.gov for a full copy of the Bid Package. You may also receive a copy of the Bid Package at 17234 Roosevelt Highway, Building B, Greenville, GA 30222.
Meriwether County will accept sealed bids until 12:00 Noon on March 17, 2017. Bids are to be sealed and delivered to the County Administration Office at 17234 Roosevelt Highway, Building B, Greenville, GA 30222. All Bids are to be clearly marked on exterior of Bid as outlined in the bid documents.

 

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Meriwether County to Receive Governor's Circle

Recognition for Keep Meriwether Beautiful

Keep Meriwether Beautiful will receive the Governor's Circle Award on Feb. 20, 2017.

The statewide awards will be presented at the State Capitol as part of the Keep Georgia Beautiful Foundation's Annual Legislative Day.

The Governor's Circle Award recognizes exemplary performance by certified affiliates in reducing litter, minimizing waste and greening local communities. To qualify for the Governor's Circle Award, affiliates must be in good standing with Keep America Beautiful -- conducting an annual Litter Index, calculating the affiliate's cost/benefit ratio and engaging volunteers to take greater responsibility for their community environment. Additionally, the affiliate must be an active member of the Georgia network.

For 2016, Keep Meriwether Beautiful had a total of 352 volunteers that picked up trash in April and October. The volunteers picked up 740 bags of trash and almost 2,000 tires were taken to the Public Works Department.

"The affiliates receiving the Governor's Circle Award represent the best of community improvement efforts," said Sarah Visser, executive director of the Keep Georgia Beautiful Foundation. "They are doing the hard work every day to keep their communities economically vibrant and environmentally sustainable."

Georgia is the first state in the Keep America Beautiful (KAB) network to create a Governor's Circle Award modeled on KAB's national good standing designation.

Created in 1978 by Governor George Busbee, Keep Georgia Beautiful became the first state affiliate of Keep America Beautiful. In 2011, the Keep Georgia Beautiful program merged with the Keep Georgia Beautiful Foundation, Inc., which was created in 1985 to promote private sector financial support for worthwhile educational programs that enhance the environment and the quality of life in Georgia. KGBF coordinates a number of environmental efforts including the Great American Cleanup and the statewide Bring One for the Chipper Christmas tree recycling program.

For more about KGB Foundation, please visit www.keepgeorgiabeautiful.org or call (404) 679-4910.

 

Keep Meriwether Beautiful plans 2017

Great American Cleanup on Sat., April 22

Keep Meriwether Beautiful is continuing its efforts, planning the 2017 Great American Cleanup event for Saturday, April 22.

Citizens are invited to join KMB in their local spring cleanup, beautification and community involvement program, the Great American Cleanup. Millions of residents and businesses across the country are taking part in this campaign to clean up and beautify communities across America. Keep Meriwether Beautiful brings the Great American Cleanup to you in partnership with Keep America Beautiful Inc., Keep Georgia Beautiful, national sponsors and state a local sponsors.

If you received a t-shirt from last year, please wear it. New t-shirts will be provided for new volunteers. Upon registration, your group will be provided with trash bags and gloves for litter collection.

Download and complete the form below and mail to Keep Meriwether Beautiful, 17234 Roosevelt Highway, Building B, Greenville, GA 30222 or email to Jane Fryer at j.fryer@meriwethercountyga.gov 

A results sheet is also provided for your team to report how much litter is collected.

For information contact Jane L. Fryer, President, Keep Meriwether Beautiful and Meriwether County Development Authority: J.Fryer@meriwethercountyga.gov or 706/672-3467- phone,  706/672-4465-fax.

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Newsletter shared by UGA Extension Meriwether County

Here is the latest UGA Extension Meriwether County ANR E-Newsletter dated February 10, 2017. For more information contact Susan C James, Agriculture and Natural Resources Agent, UGA Extension-Meriwether County, 706-672-4235 Office.

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Meriwether County Development Authority

seeks sealed proposals for site development 

Posted Feb. 7, 2017

Meriwether County Development Authority is seeking proposals for site development for 56 acres on Meriwether Park Drive.

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Meriwether Commissioners honor Asie Teal

The Meriwether County Board of Commissioners at their Jan. 24, 2017, meeting recognized Asie Teal. Mr. Teal worked for Meriwether County Public Works from March 26, 1999 until his retirement on December 23, 2016. Mr. Teal was presented a plaque from the Board of Commissioners and Public Works.

 

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Jan. 27 UGA-Meriwether Extension newsletter shared

Susan Carol James has shared the Jan. 27 UGA-Meriwether County Extension newsletter. Contact Ms. James to receive this newsletter by email. She may be reached at: 

Susan C James
Agriculture and Natural Resources Agent
UGA Extension-Meriwether County

706-672-4235 Office or scj24262@uga.edu.

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Development Authority Says Thank You to Bruce O'Neal

At the January 9th meeting of the Meriwether County Industrial Development Authority, Bruce O’Neal was presented with a clock to thank him for his years of service to the Development Authority. Mr. O’Neal has been involved with the Authority since the creation of the Meriwether County Industrial Park in 2008. He assisted in the design and engineering of the park, making sure the water, sewer and gas lines were installed correctly and oversaw the construction of Meriwether Park Drive. Mr. O’Neal has been instrumental in working with Dongwon, Mando and SMS to make sure their construction was completed correctly. Robert Moreland stated that the park would not be where it is today without the input of Bruce O’Neal. He served as a Board member from January, 2013-January, 2017. At right is Meriwether County Industrial Development Authority President Jane Fryer.

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Grant approved to continue Meriwether butterfly gardens

Meriwether County has received a $5,000 state grant to continue expanding its butterfly garden project with a garden in Woodbury.

The announcement came in an email sent Friday, Jan. 20 to Carolyn McKinley of the Meriwether County Chamber of Commerce and Jane Fryer of Meriwether County's Industrial Development Authority from the Georgia Department of Economic Development Tourism Office of Product Development:

"Good afternoon Carolyn and Jane,
 
On behalf of the GDEcD Tourism Office of Product Development, we would like to congratulate the Meriwether County Chamber of Commerce and Tourism & Meriwether County Industrial Development Authority on receiving the Tourism Product Development (TPD) Grant Award of $5,000 for the Woodbury Butterfly Retreat. We are super excited about seeing this project completed in the near future ... Again, congratulations on your award, and we look forward to working with you!"
 
The notification came from Cindy Eidson - Director, Product Development Office and Chris Cannon - Ass’t. Director.

Meriwether has already developed butterfly gardens in Warm Springs and Luthersville (pictured) as part of its "Murals and Monarchs" tourism effort. Historic murals have also been painted by artist John Christian in Warm Springs, Lone Oak and Woodbury.

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Jan. 13 UGA-Meriwether Extension newsletter posted

 

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Meriwether BOC welcomes Commissioner Mary Bray

Welcome to newly elected Commissioner Mary Bray who attended her first Board of Commissioners meeting Jan. 11 after taking office January 1st this year.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Meriwether Names New Fire Chief, Public Works Director

Congratulations to these two gentlemen. Both have been serving in Interim positions which have been now named as permanent appointments. Alfons Pynenburg (left) as County Fire Chief and Tyrell Johnson (right) as Public Works Director.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Meriwether employees gear up for

"Biggest Winner" health challenge

Biggest Winner Challenge begins 1/16, runs thru 3/12

  • Eligibility: All Meriwether County Employees on county Health Insurance
  • Goal: lose weight in a healthy, sustainable way and feel great!

(no starvation diets and/or the use of diet aids accepted)

  • Sign up and do initial weigh-in on January 10 or 12 with Michelle Sabol at:

 

1/10

TUES

911 Center

5:30am-8:30am

Admin Building

10:30am-1:00pm

1/12

THURS

Sheriff’s Dept

5:00am-9:30am

Courthouse

12:00pm-2:00pm

 

  • Form Team of 3-5 people and increase your chance for more prize money
  • Submit Team Name & member names by 12pm Monday 1/16 to Michelle Sabol

 

 

  • Individual & Team Prizes for highest percentage of body weight lost:

 

1st place

2nd place

3rd place

4th place

Individual Male

$250

$175

$100

$50

Individual Female

$250

$175

$100

$50

Team

$100/person

$75/person

$50/person

$25/person

  • $100 Prize to 1 Individual losing the most weight in pounds

 

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 ATLANTA, Dec. 29, 2016 — Meriwether County today announced the launch of Georgia’s Undead Trail, which will take visitors on a 93-mile journey through urban landscapes and trendy downtowns that have all been the backdrop of television series depicting zombies and vampires. Destinations that are featured in the trail include Atlanta, Covington, Conyers, Senoia and Woodbury.  

“Georgia’s film industry is booming, and one of the many benefits of all that filming is that visitors from around the world want to come here to experience the locations made famous by their favorite movies and TV programs.  Film tourism is a real money generator that remains long after the project has wrapped,” said Kevin Langston, deputy commissioner for tourism at the Georgia Department of Economic Development. “Georgia’s Undead Trail is the perfect tourism offering that can appeal to fans from all over the world who are wanting to experience the locations of their favorite television shows and films.” 
Through a variety of film locations, attractions and restaurants, fans can get up close and personal to the filming locations that transformed Georgia towns into the locations used in popular shows including “The Walking Dead,” “The Vampire Diaries,” “The Originals” and more. Georgia’s Undead Trail also features a list of “Top 10 Must-See Sites” that include popular film tours, shops, restaurants and even a “zombie-themed” geocache trail.
“Representatives from the city of Woodbury have actively participated in this multi-county project and we are all very proud that the city is prominently featured on Georgia’s Undead Trail,” said Carolyn McKinley, president of Meriwether County Chamber of Commerce and Tourism. “This trail gives us one more tourism product to promote and we recognize its value in taking our community to a new level through this participation with the other counties featured on the trail.  We are proud to be a part of this collaboration and happy that we can offer this new tourism product to our visitors.”
Information on Georgia’s Undead Trail can be found soon at www.georgiasundeadtrail.com . 
For more on things to do in Meriwether, including “The Real Woodbury Zombie Geo Quest,” go to http://meriwethertourism.com .

About GDEcD and Meriwether County tourism
The Georgia Department of Economic Development (GDEcD) plans, manages and mobilizes state resources to attract new business investment to Georgia, drive the expansion of existing industry and small business, locate new markets for Georgia products, inspire tourists to visit Georgia and promote the state as a top destination for arts events and film, music and digital entertainment projects.  Through its Tourism Product Development Division, Meriwether County has been the beneficiary of a number of grants which have helped to fund several murals featuring historic location, a series of butterfly gardens, geocache adventures and the President Theatre.

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Meriwether now "Storm Ready"

Meriwether County recently received word it had received the Storm Ready designation through April 30, 2019.

The Meriwether Board of Commissioners at a recent meeting thanked Bill Gregory and Brin Jones for helping get the county certified.
StormReady® is a National Weather Service program designed to recognize counties that have reached a high level of severe weather preparedness. To be recognized as StormReady®, a county must meet criteria established jointly between the NWS and state and local emergency management officials. These criteria include:

- Having a local 24-hour warning point and an Emergency Operations Center.
- Having multiple ways of receiving NWS warnings.
- Being able to monitor local weather/river conditions.
- Having multiple ways of alerting the public.
- Promoting public readiness through community seminars and presentations.
- Having a formal hazardous weather plan.
- Having trained spotters.
- Conducting periodic drills / exercises.
- Interacting with their supporting NWS office.

The essence of the program is to ensure the entire warning system performs properly when severe weather strikes. The "system" is comprised of the NWS (which issues the warnings), local emergency management (which ensures the warnings get communicated), and members of the public (who respond properly to the warnings). When each part of this system performs well, lives and property are saved. StormReady® recognizes those counties in which the system is most likely to perform well.

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Meriwether County Employment statistics listed

Here are the latest employment statistics from the Georgia Department of Labor.

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Get Pecans Cracked Locally

From UGA Extension Agent Susan Carol James: Beth Neely-Hadley just let me know that you can get pecans cracked at the Manchester Farm and Garden also. It takes about 20 minutes for a 5 gallon bucket. If it’s busy they will crack them in the order that they are brought in. You can leave them and pick them up later if you like. They charge 30 cents a pound.
 
Manchester Farm and Garden Supply
1106 Roosevelt Hwy
Manchester, GA 31816
(706) 846-3101
 
Days and Hours:
Friday              9AM–6PM
Saturday         9AM–4AM
Sunday            Closed
Monday           9AM–6PM
Tuesday          9AM–6PM
Wednesday     9AM–4AM
Thursday         9AM–6PM
 
Susan C James
Agriculture and Natural Resources Agent
UGA Extension-Meriwether County
706-672-4235 Office

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UGA Extension Meriwether County ANR E-Newsletter
Tuesday, Dec. 19, 2016

 

The first section of this week’s edition is about visiting the Eubanks’ farm for syrup making.

The Eubanks have worked extremely hard for years to keep this historic, southern activity alive. They have always graciously shared the process and the end results with family and friends.


MERIWETHER COUNTY BUTTERFLY GARDENS

The Luthersville City Park Butterfly Garden (pictured), the Warm Springs Welcome Center Butterfly Garden and the City of Manchester Butterfly Garden have all been added to the UGA Center for Urban Agriculture Pollinator Spaces Project. You can visit the website at: https://ugaurbanag.com/gardens/pollinators/project-gardens/…
Look for the picture of the Monarch at the Luthersville Garden-ours is the only image of one.
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BACKYARD POULTRY CLASS
Chicken Coops, Also Known as Poultry Housing
Brian Maddy, ANR Agent in Troup County, has put together an awesome presentation on the design and construction of chicken coops for Tuesday evening; January 24th at 7 PM. Topics to be covered are permanent and portable housing, space requirements, design, location, building materials, and security. Even if you already have poultry housing I highly recommend that you attend to make sure that it is adequate or to learn how it can be improved. And if you are just thinking about getting chickens, come learn how to get construction of your housing done right from the beginning. The class is free.
We will be meeting at the Greenville Public Library at 2323 Gilbert Street in Greenville. To preregister please call Susan at 706-977-0882 or email her at scj24262@uga.edu
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4-H PROJECT SAFE
Modified Trap (Shotgun) and Archery Teams-Meriwether County
Skills for Life - Activity for a Lifetime
Practice for the Meriwether County 4-H Shotgun Team will begin in January, 2017. Any student in the 7th-12th grade can participate in either the Junior or Senior Division. For more information about joining the shotgun team, please contact Terry Strickland at 706-881-2414 or tstrickpig@aol.com. The new coach for the archery team is Drew Pike. You can reach Drew at 678-708-6277. For general information about Project Safe please visit: http://www.georgia4h.org/safe/disciplines/shotgun.htm
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PESTICIDE CLASS IN HARRIS COUNTY
Harris County Extension is hosting pesticide recertification training on January 11, 2017 from 8:40 AM to 4:00 PM. The title of the training is Pesticide Use, Safety and Handling. A total of 5 credit hours will be given for the whole day of training in categories 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 31, 32, 35, 36, 37, 38 or 41.
Register online at www.ugagriffincontinuinged.com and look under “Upcoming Events” Pre-registration fee by Friday, January 6, 2017 is $45 or $55 at the door on the 11th.
For questions or more information please email Steve Morgan at smorgan@uga.edu or call 706-628-4824.
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2017 GEORGIA AG FORECAST
The keynote topic for the January 20 meeting will be the Veterinary Feed Directive (VFD), given by Dr. Brent Credille of the UGA College of Veterinary Medicine. Check-in begins at 9 a.m. with seminars starting at 10 a.m. followed by lunch at 11:30 a.m. The meeting will take place at the Carroll County Ag Center at 900 Newnan Road in Carrollton.
Cost is $30 per person or $200 for a table of eight. Advance registration is required. For more information or to register, visit http://www.georgiaagforecast.com, call 706-583-0347 or email carlam@uga.edu.
The VFD final rule outlines the process for authorizing use of VFD drugs (animal drugs intended for use in or on animal feed that require the supervision of a licensed veterinarian) and provides veterinarians in all states with a framework for authorizing the use of medically important antimicrobials in feed when needed for specific animal health purposes. The rule goes into effect January 1, 2017.
For more information on how this rule will impact your animal production facility or farm please visit: http://www.fda.gov/…/DevelopmentApprovalProce…/ucm449019.htm
Or you can watch a video at: http://www.fda.gov/…/AnimalFeedSafetySystemAF…/ucm529868.htm
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FSA NEWS
LIVESTOCK FORAGE PROGRAM
There is also still time for farmers in Meriwether and surrounding counties to file with FSA for the Livestock Forage Program. Eligible livestock producers must complete a CCC-853 and the required supporting documentation no later than January 30, 2017 for 2016 losses. Producers with cash-leased land are required to provide written lease agreements from the land owner containing specific information on the rented land. In addition, grazing land for which benefits are requested under LFP are required to have been reported to the FSA office; if the land has not already been reported, a late-filed acreage report can be accepted but a “late-filing” fee will be assessed.
UPCOMING ACREAGE REPORTING DATES
In order to comply with FSA program eligibility requirements, all producers are encouraged to visit their local FSA County office to file an accurate crop certification report by the applicable deadline. The following acreage reporting dates are applicable for the entire state of Georgia: 
January 15, 2017: Apples, Blueberries, Canola, Peaches, Rye, and ALL Fall-Seeded Small Grains
The following exceptions apply to the above acreage reporting dates:
If the crop has not been planted by the above acreage reporting date, then the acreage must be reported no later than 15 calendar days after planting is completed. 
If a producer acquires additional acreage after the above acreage reporting date, then the acreage must be reported no later than 30 calendars days after purchase or acquiring the lease. Appropriate documentation must be provided to the county office. 
If a perennial forage crop is reported with the intended use of “cover only,” “green manure,” “left standing,” or “seed,” then the acreage must be reported by July 15th. Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program (NAP) policyholders should note that the acreage reporting date for NAP covered crops is the earlier of the dates listed above or 15 calendar days before grazing or harvesting of the crop begins. For questions regarding crop certification and crop loss reports, please contact your local FSA County Office.
For Meriwether County farmers please contact the Carrollton FSA office at 770-834-2097 for more information. To receive email updates from FSA please visit:
https://service.govdelivery.com/accou…/USFSA/subscriber/new…
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The Meriwether County Extension office will be closed from December 22, 2016 through January 2, 2017. We will reopen on January 3, 2017. We wish everyone a happy and safe holiday and we look forward to working with you in 2017!
Susan C James
Agriculture and Natural Resources Agent
UGA Extension-Meriwether County
706-672-4235 Office

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...................................

Planning Continues on Meriwether Murals

A discussion was held at the Dec.1 Together in Meriwether tourism group to review progress on the next two murals planned as part of the Meriwether "Murals and Monarchs" historic murals and butterfly gardens project.

According to Carolyn McKinley of Meriwether Chamber of Commerce, Greenville’s mural will be situated on the building across from Hill Brothers Corner as travelers come into Greenville from LaGrange. The owner of the building has agreed and will absorb the cost for needed prep work, which will take place in January, with actual painting of the mural to start in February.

A Greenville delegation met with the artist to offer recommended changes to the rendering, McKinley said.

For Manchester, their mural will go on the Mexican restaurant in the downtown area. "This will be the largest of the murals and a number of great ideas were developed as far as mural composition, including the mill (including the pond); a train engine (possibly depicted coming through the map); something representing Manchester High School; the President Theatre; Elliott Station; Bill Mathis; Stuart Woods; FDR receiving a milkshake from M.B. Guy, Jr.,; Willie Holloway (first black police chief) and the Rosenwald school," McKinley said. This mural is targeted for March-April start.  Both murals must be complete by June 30th to comply with state tourism grant timelines.

Two grant applications were submitted during the most recent grant cycle from the state Tourism Product Development Office.  One is for a Butterfly Retreat in Woodbury, being so designated because of a water feature addition which is a significant enhancement to a garden, said McKinley. This one will also have matching gardens on either side of the water feature.

A second grant was submitted for the solar powered audio box to be placed at the Red Oak Creek Covered Bridge.

"Both of these projects are sufficiently unique that they should garner a favorable review," said McKinley. Announcements will be made in January

.....................................

 

 

LOCAL MARKET
Hudson Farm Peaches
The Hudson Farm stand at the corner of Hwy 85 and Main Street in Woodbury has been taken over by reindeer. Charles and his crew are busy creating holiday cheer. I really appreciate all of the local materials that have gone into producing the reindeer but I especially love the antlers made from the branches of fig trees.
Strickland Brothers Farm has an assortment of greens is for sale including kale, arugula, collards, turnip greens, mustard greens, spinach and romaine lettuce as well as daikon radish. You can contact Terry at 706-881-2414
Fitzgerald Fruit Farms on Imlac Road outside of Woodbury has started harvesting their fall producing Albion strawberries. They also have a variety of apples for sale. You can contact them at 706-553-2795 or visit www.fitzgeraldfruitfarms.com
Frank Fowler is selling pecans from his family’s pecan orchards off Imlac Road. Frank takes exceptionable care of these trees, some of which his daddy planted 75+ years ago. I bought some and it is amazing how well they filled out considering the drought. Contact Frank at 678-967-1438. The pecans are in the shell but you can get them cracked at the Chipley Food Co-op in Pine Mountain (706-457-1978) or Manchester Farm and Garden Supply in Manchester (706-846-3101).
Paul Hodges is moving and looking for homes for his livestock. He has goats (Alpine, Nigerian and crosses); pigs (KuneKune and American Guinea hogs) and a wool sheep. If anyone is interested please call 706-672-9051.
**********************
Have a wonderful weekend,
Susan
Susan C James
Agriculture and Natural Resources Agent
UGA Extension-Meriwether County
706-672-4235 Office

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Bike Ride Event Joining Meriwether's

Peaches in the Pines June Festival

The planning of the first Meriwether Miles Bike Ride continues even as the holidays are fast approaching and next June 2017 seems a LONG way off. But as with all successful events this bike ride will take a good deal of planning and ongoing work.
According to Gail Coffee of the Together in Meriwether tourism committee:
As you may know the Peaches in the Pines festival sponsored by the Meriwether Chamber of Commerce and Tourism is a great event that is now in its third year at Lake Meriwether the second Saturday in June.
In order to draw even more participation, and especially to entice younger people to become acquainted with our county, we at Together in Meriwether are trying something new.
A bike ride to correspond with the festival is being planned and the first steps have been taken.
The waiver has been approved by our county attorney, and the first organizational meetings have been held with representatives from local bike clubs and bike shops in the LaGrange, Senoia and Newnan areas.
One of the biggest needs at this time is for volunteers to be at the rest stops to hand out bottles of water, oranges, energy bars, etc.
Will you try to plan ahead and be with us that Saturday?
It would be great to have our county officials there to welcome the riders and invite them back to Meriwether county as business owners and residents.
Remember, this is not a race so there will be time to talk and get to know people.
As in all community outreach we would like to have great results from those who participate.
In this instance it could mean a brighter future for Meriwether county by introducing ourselves personally to our visitors.
Invite as many other riders and non-riders you know to join the fun.
Information and contact data will be on the county website and other social media at the beginning of the new year.
We're looking forward to this fun event and hope to see you there to enjoy yourself and promote Meriwether County.

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UGA Extension Meriwether County ANR E-Newsletter
December 2, 2016

SMALL RUMINANTS
December Dinner Meeting
We will be having an informal meeting on Friday December 9th at 6 PM at the Golden Corral in Newnan. If you are interested in learning about raising sheep and goats you are welcome to join us. This get together is a chance for producers to share stories, problems, concerns, and successes.
The Golden Corral is at 605 Bullsboro Drive (Hwy 34), just a couple blocks off I-85 in Newnan, GA.
Future Programs
Levi Russell, UGA Professor of Agricultural & Applied Economics, will be visiting us to talk about small ruminant marketing on February 21, 2017-time and place to still be determined.
**********************
NRCS-EQUIP
DUE TO DROUGHT, USDA-NRCS ANNOUNCES ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY INCENTIVES PROGRAM (EQIP) SIGN-UP EXTENSION IN GEORGIA
The statewide sign up for fiscal year 2017 Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) has been extended through December 16, 2016. The sign-up period was supposed to close November 18th, so there is still time to get your application submitted if you ran out of time! Remember you must have your property on file with the Farm Service Agency (FSA) in order to qualify for any NRCS program.
According to State Conservationist Terrance O. Rudolph those applicants in the worst impacted counties of Georgia (counties designated as “extreme drought” (D3) or “exceptional drought” (D4)) will be assigned the highest priority. Others in non D3 or D4 counties are still eligible to apply.
“Our farmers, ranchers and forest landowners are among the more than 8.3 million Georgians currently experiencing drought conditions of some kind. We want them to know that NRCS is prepared to assist those most affected, as much as we can,” said Rudolph. “I encourage producers to take this extra time to contact their field office staff and discuss if EQIP is right for them. Also, if they already have an application on file, to make sure it reflects all of their current needs.”
For more information on EQIP please visit:
https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/…/main/ga/programs/financial/eqip/
Or you can contact Rory Richardson, District Conservationist at 770-251-4283 or rory.richardson@ga.usda.gov
*********************
FSA LIVESTOCK FORAGE PROGRAM
There is also still time for farmers to file with FSA for the Livestock Forage Program
Eligible livestock producers must complete a CCC-853 and the required supporting documentation no later than January 30, 2017 for 2016 losses. Producers with cash-leased land are required to provide written lease agreements from the land owner containing specific information on the rented land. In addition, grazing land for which benefits are requested under LFP are required to have been reported to the FSA office; if the land has not already been reported, a late-filed acreage report can be accepted but a “late-filing” fee will be assessed.
Please contact the Carrollton FSA office at 770-834-2097 for more information.
To receive email updates from FSA please visit:
https://service.govdelivery.com/accou…/USFSA/subscriber/new…
***********************
BACKYARD POULTRY
Chicken Coops, Also Known as Poultry Housing Class
Brian Maddy, ANR Agent in Troup County, has put together an awesome presentation on the design and construction of chicken coops for Tuesday evening, January 24th at 7 PM. Even if you already have poultry housing I highly recommend that you attend to make sure that it is adequate or to learn how it can be improved. And if you are just thinking about getting chickens, come learn how to get construction of your housing done right from the beginning. The location is still to be determined. There will be no cost.
**********************
WEATHER
So everyone should have gotten some rain this week. I’ve had reports of 2.1 to 3.3 inches total of rainfall for Tuesday and Wednesday. We experienced quite a range of temperatures this week from a low of 25°F to highs in the mid-70s. There was also a confirmed EF-1 tornado with 100 mph winds in the county around 2:30 Wednesday afternoon. This morning I found a heavy frost outside my Greenville office while the temperature when I left home in Manchester was a much warmer 38°F. Basically, we had a “normal” week of “winter” weather which seems to fluctuate much more than summer weather.
The USDA Southeast Regional Climate Hub sent out a seasonal ENSO summary for winter 2106-2017 today. The expectation is that our winter will be warmer and drier than normal due to La Nina influence. There may be concerns about meeting chilling requirements again in 2017 for peaches. Cool season forage crops may be impacted by low rainfall but hopefully not as severely as forages this past spring and summer. Bear in mind that we are in a weak La Nina situation so things could change.
Below are some definitions that might be helpful in understanding the terms used in forecasting the weather based on El Nino/La Nina. For even more information please visit: http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/…/anal…/ensostuff/ensofaq.shtml
ENSO stands for El Nino/ Southern Oscillation. The ENSO cycle refers to the coherent and sometimes very strong year-to-year variations in sea- surface temperatures, convective rainfall, surface air pressure, and atmospheric circulation that occur across the equatorial Pacific Ocean. El Nino and La Nina represent opposite extremes in the ENSO cycle.
El Nino refers to the above-average sea-surface temperatures that periodically develop across the east-central equatorial Pacific. It represents the warm phase of the ENSO cycle, and is sometimes referred to as a Pacific warm episode.
La Nina refers to the periodic cooling of sea-surface temperatures across the east-central equatorial Pacific. It represents the cold phase of the ENSO cycle, and is sometimes referred to as a Pacific cold episode.
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DECEMBER 5th, World Soil Day 2016 
In 2002, the International Union of Soil Sciences (IUSS), made a resolution proposing the 5th of December as World Soil Day to celebrate the importance of soil as a critical component of the natural system and as a vital contributor to human wellbeing.
The FAO Conference, in June 2013, unanimously endorsed World Soil Day and requested official adoption at the 68th UN General Assembly. In December 2013, the 68th UN General Assembly declared 5th of December as the World Soil Day.
So what’s so important about soil? The adopted resolution says it all pretty clearly:
Noting that soils constitute the foundation for agricultural development, essential ecosystem functions and food security and hence are the key to sustaining life on Earth
Recognizing that the sustainability of soils is key to addressing the pressures of a growing population and that recognition, advocacy and support for promoting sustainable management of soils can contribute to healthy soils and thus to a food secure world and to stable and sustainably used ecosystems
Our office hadn’t planned any special event to celebrate “soils” but I hope everyone will take time to think about how their lives are impacted by soils and hopefully realize that it is a very important resource to be conserved, protected and even better, improved.
Protecting the soil, which is a major component of our environment, will be emphasized in the class (Pesticides in the Environment: Movement and Effects) that I will be teaching on the evening of Monday, December 5th. The class was structured for commercial and private pesticide applicators to receive recertification credits but in the spirit of celebrating World Soil Day 2016 anyone is welcome to attend.
December 5th 7:00-8:00 PM
Greenville Public Library
2323 Gilbert St, Greenville, GA 30222
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LOCAL MARKET
Hudson Farm Peaches
The Hudson Farm stand at the corner of Hwy 85 and Main Street in Woodbury has been taken over by reindeer. Charles and his crew are busy creating holiday cheer. I really appreciate all of the local materials that have gone into producing the reindeer but I especially love the antlers made from the branches of fig trees.
Strickland Brothers Farm
An assortment of greens is for sale including kale, arugula, collards, turnip greens, mustard greens, spinach and romaine lettuce as well as daikon radish. You can contact Terry at 706-881-2414
Fitzgerald Fruit Farms on Imlac Road outside of Woodbury has started harvesting their fall producing Albion strawberries. They also have a variety of apples for sale. You can contact them at 706-553-2795 or visit www.fitzgeraldfruitfarms.com
Frank Fowler is selling pecans from his family’s pecan orchards off Imlac Road. Frank takes exceptionable care of these trees, some of which his daddy planted 75+ years ago. I bought some and it is amazing how well they filled out considering the drought. Contact Frank at 678-967-1438. The pecans are in the shell but you can get them cracked at the Chipley Food Co-op in Pine Mountain. They are charging 45₵ per pound. They are also selling shelled pecans for $11.00/pound. The co-op is at 206 N. King Ave Pine Mountain, phone number is 706-457-1978. Their hours are Tuesday and Thursday from 9 to 1; Friday from 4 to 6 and Saturday from 8 to 1.
*********************
Have a wonderful weekend,
Susan
Susan C James
Agriculture and Natural Resources Agent
UGA Extension-Meriwether County
706-672-4235 Office

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Assistance Organized for Tennessee Wildfire Victims

If you are interested in helping the people in the Gatlinburg/Pigeon Forge Area, Danny Stephens will transport supplies this Saturday. Items needed are: baby formula, yard tools (rakes, shovels, etc.), wipes, non-perishable ready to eat items, cleaning supplies, pet food, and gift cards. Items will be taken to New Hope Church of God in Sevierville, TN which is a drop-off point for supplies. Local donations can be dropped off at the Meriwether County Board of Commissioners Office in Greenville or at Manchester Farm and Garden. Items will be picked up from both locations this Friday, December 2nd. Please note they have plenty of water and diapers.
 
Beverly A. Thomas
Meriwether County Clerk
 
Meriwether County Board of Commissioners
17234 Roosevelt Hwy. Bldg. B
Greenville, GA 30222
706-672-1314 ext. 3462

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Woodbury Now Part of Georgia’s

Undead Trail of Zombies & Vampires

Woodbury is now part of the newly launched Georgia’s Undead Trail of Zombies & Vampires.

This is a multi-county project involving Meriwether; Coweta; Fulton; Rockdale and Newton Counties to showcase film locations, attractions and restaurants which offer experiences for fans of The Walking Dead and the Vampire Diaries.

Woodbury’s Zombie Geoquest is advertised along with the antique stores and Smitty’s Restaurant where the visitor can feast on a zombie burger or zombie dog. Along with the descriptions of these activities, the Woodbury Welcome Sign and the Woodbury Water Tower are also included.

For more information visit http://www.meriwethertourism.com

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Lots of December Events at FDR State Park

Here is the list of December events for FDR State Park. Enjoy!

....................................

Latest Labor Force Stats for Meriwether Released

Here are the latest estimates for Meriwether County employment.

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Agenda announced for Nov. 22 Meriwether BOC meeting

Please see the Agenda (Below) for the Meriwether County Board of Commissioners Meeting that is scheduled for November 22, 2016 at 6:00 pm. The meeting will be held at the Administration Building located at 17234 Roosevelt Hwy. Bldg. B, Greenville, GA.
If you have questions or need assistance please contact Beverly Thomas at 706-672-3462.
The meeting is open to the public.


AGENDA -- MERIWETHER COUNTY BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS
November 22, 2016 -- 6:00 P.M.

I. CALL TO ORDER
INVOCATION
PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE
II. ADOPT AGENDA
III. MINUTES
1. November 9, 2016
IV. MUNICIPAL COMMENTS
V. CONSTITUTIONAL OFFICER’S COMMENTS
VI. DEPARTMENT HEAD COMMENTS
VII. PUBLIC HEARING
1. Jeffery Hunter request rezone from LDR to RD for property located on Tax Map #076, Parcel #012-001, LD #8, LL #198 with frontage of 600+ feet with an area of 6.44 acres. The purpose is for single family homes. (This was continued from the 11-4-16 BOCC meeting. Applicant has since withdrawn rezoning request)
2. M&M Property, LLC request to rezone from Industrial to A-1 (26 acres) on property located on Tax Map #166, Parcel #4, LD #9, LL #44, with a frontage of 950 feet with an area of 32.99 acres. The purpose is for Residential and Agriculture.
3. Closing of Bowes Church Road
4. Alcoholic Beverage License Request from Quercus Arena for a Retail consumption dealer (malt beverage & wine) license
VIII. OLD BUSINESS
1. Courthouse Wall Project
2. Appointment to the Public Facilities Authority
IX. NEW BUSINESS
1. Appointment to the Airport Authority (District 4)
2. Appointment to the IDA (District 5)
3. Resolution confirming reappointment of Robert Gregory Hobbs to the Meriwether County Board of Tax Assessors
4. Resolution of the Board of Commissioners declaring the results of the Election held on November 8, 2016, and for other related purposes
5. Accept Resolution of the Meriwether County Board of Elections and Registration Declaring the results of an Election held on November 8, 2016; and for other related purposes
6. Business Associate Agreement between Meriwether County Board of Commissioners and Corporate Health Partners, LLC
7. Set 1st Reading related to the establishment of an Advisory Board - Lake Meriwether 
8. Red Oak Covered Bridge Grant Proposal
9. “Storm Ready” designation extension by the National Weather Service
10. Discuss 2017 LMIG
X. REPORT FROM FINANCE DIRECTOR
1. Finance Report
XI. REPORT FROM COUNTY ADMINISTRATOR
XII. REPORT FROM COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
XIII. REPORT FROM COUNTY ATTORNEY
XIV. PUBLIC COMMENT
XV. EXECUTIVE SESSION
Legal
Personnel 
Real Estate 
Tax Matters
XVI. FUTURE MEETINGS & NOTICES
November 24-25 Thanksgiving Holidays
December 14, 2016 9:00 am
December 27, 2016 6:00 pm (cancelled)
XVII. ADJOURNMENT

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UGA Extension Meriwether County ANR E-Newsletter
November 19, 2016

NRCS-EQUIP
DUE TO DROUGHT, USDA-NRCS ANNOUNCES ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY INCENTIVES PROGRAM (EQIP) SIGN-UP EXTENSION IN GEORGIA
The statewide sign up for fiscal year 2017 Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) has been extended through December 16, 2016. The sign-up period was supposed to close yesterday, the 18th, so there is still time to get your application submitted if you ran out of time!
****************
SMALL RUMINANTS
December Meeting
So I have picked the date Friday December 9th at 6 PM for our meeting in Newnan. Choices of restaurants on Hwy 34 right off I85 are Golden Corral, Panera Bread, Olive Garden, Ruby Tuesday and Cracker Barrel. Speak up and let me know your preference! Anyone is welcome to join us who is interested in learning about raising sheep and goats. This get together is a chance to share stories, problems, concerns, and successes. You’ve been asking for such an opportunity so here is your chance. Please let me know if you will be attending so I can make a reservation if necessary. Also, if a later time would be better for folks driving a long distance let me know that. I just figured 6 PM might get us in and settled before other folks show up.
*****************
LIVESTOCK
Spent Grains for Feed
I sent out a list of possible contacts for finding spent grains earlier this week because I’ve had requests for sources. Ric Alexander let me know about Southbound Brewing Company in Savannah. They may be a little too far away for some of you (maybe not) but if you know any struggling livestock producers closer to Savannah you can let them know about these folks. Their phone number is 912-335-1737, call after 2 PM. They also have a website http://southboundbrewingco.com/ which has a contact page for emailing them.
For some really interesting, albeit scientific for some articles, writing about using spent grains as feed, please visit the links below:
Wet Brewer’s Grains for Cattle: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/an241
Feeding Barley to Poultry from eXtension: http://articles.extension.org/…/6…/feeding-barley-to-poultry
Question of the Week from ATTRA - A National Sustainable Agriculture Assistance Program
Is feeding brewer’s grain to steers beneficial? How much should I feed per head? 
https://attra.ncat.org/…/is-feeding-brewer-s-grain-to-steer…
Kevin Lee’s Master Thesis on Anaerobic Digestion of Brewer’s Spent Grain in a Novel Plug Flow Reactor System: https://getd.libs.uga.edu/pdfs/lee_kevin_201008_ms.pdf
And finally from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO)-slanted more towards tropical production systems but still interesting to read-Better Utilization of Locally Available Feed Resources: http://www.fao.org/ag/againfo/themes/documents/PUB6/P621.htm
Managing Cattle in Drought Conditions
Monday November 28th, 2016 5:30 PM-9:00 PM
Georgia’s Current Severe Drought Condition and Predictions into 2017
Dr. Pam Knox, University of Georgia Agriculture Climatologist
Managing Nutrition and Forage Quality during Severe Drought
Dr. Jacob Segers, University of Georgia Assistant Professor/Cattle Nutrition
Understanding Diseases and Health Challenges in Drought
Dr. Brenton Credille, University of Georgia College of Veterinary Medicine/Beef Production Management
Navigating Expenses and Tax Challenges
Dr. Levi Russell, University of Georgia Assistant Professor/Agriculture Economist
Carroll County Ag Center/Extension Office
900 Newnan Road
Carrollton, GA 30117
The cost is $10 which includes a meal and reference material. To attend the workshop, please register by November 23. You may register by emailing Richard Littleton at rlittle@uga.edu or calling the Carroll County Extension at 770-836-8546.
*******************
CAES UGA Extension Sustainable Agriculture Fall
2017 Newsletter is available now at: 
http://sustainagga.org/…/Sustainable_Ag_UGA_Fall_2016_Newsl…
*****************
PESTICIDE LICENSE RE-CERTIFICATION CLASS
Pesticides in the Environment (Movement and Effects)
This training is part of the UGA Pesticide Safety Education Program.
Commercial Category 21 and Private Applicators: 1 Hour Credit
December 5th 7:00-8:00 PM
Greenville Public Library
2323 Gilbert St, Greenville, GA 30222
To register for the class please call our office at 706-672-4235. If you have questions about the class please contact Susan James at scj24262@uga.edu or 706-977-0882
There is no charge for the class.
*******************
4-H PROJECT SAFE
Modified Trap (Shotgun) Team-Meriwether County
Skills for Life - Activity for a Lifetime
Practice for the Meriwether County 4-H Shotgun Team will begin in January, 2017. Any student in the 7th-12th grade can participate in either the Junior or Senior Division. For more information about joining the shotgun team, please contact Terry Strickland at 706-881-2414 or tstrickpig@aol.com. For general information about Project Safe please visit: http://www.georgia4h.org/safe/disciplines/shotgun.htm
******************
LOCAL MARKET
Hudson Farm Peaches

The Hudson Farm stand at the corner of Hwy 85 and Main Street in Woodbury has been taken over by reindeer. Charles and his crew are busy creating holiday cheer. I really appreciate all of the local materials that have gone into producing the reindeer but I especially love the antlers made from the branches of fig trees. They all have green tips so if you are looking for plant material to root…

 


Strickland Brothers Farm
An assortment of greens is for sale including kale, arugula, collards, turnip greens, mustard greens, spinach and romaine lettuce as well as daikon radish. You can contact Terry at 706-881-2414
Fitzgerald Fruit Farms on Imlac Road outside of Woodbury has started harvesting their fall producing Albion strawberries. They also have a variety of apples for sale. You can contact them at 706-553-2795 or visit www.fitzgeraldfruitfarms.com
Frank Fowler is selling pecans from his family’s pecan orchards off Imlac Road. Frank takes exceptionable care of these trees, some of which his daddy planted 75+ years ago. I bought some this week and it is amazing how well they filled out considering the drought. Contact Frank at 678-967-1438.
The pecans are in the shell but you can get them cracked at the Chipley Food Co-op in Pine Mountain. They are charging 45₵ per pound. They are also selling shelled pecans for $11.00/pound. The co-op is at 206 N. King Ave Pine Mountain, phone number is 706-457-1978. Their hours are Tuesday and Thursday from 9 to 1; Friday from 4 to 6 and Saturday from 8 to 1.
******************
Pine Mountain Trail
One of my real joys in hiking is getting to see plants that I won’t typically see any other way. These are the plants that are suited to very specific habitats and can be difficult to cultivate. Gentians fall in this category. So I was thrilled last weekend to come across numerous clumps of what I believe to be either Gentiana clausa or G. saponaria throughout my hike. I love the blues!

 

 


Have a great weekend and a Happy Thanksgiving,
Susan

Susan C James
Agriculture and Natural Resources Agent
UGA Extension-Meriwether County
706-672-4235 Office
706-977-0882 Mobile

......................................

Meriwether Under Water Restrictions Due to Drought

From Susan Carol James, Meriwether Extension Service  
Thu, Nov 17, 2016 at 5:43 pm

So the word was sent out today by the GA EPD. We have been expecting it. For those of you who have been reading about the USDA Drought Monitor classifications which put Meriwether County at a D4 Level at the end of October, you may be wondering what’s the difference.
 
The Georgia Department of Natural Resources Environmental Protection Division is the governmental agency that has the right to regulate/restrict water usage in the State of Georgia. Taken directly from the attached news release are the prohibited water uses for anyone on a public water system in Meriwether and 51 other counties. It does not apply to personal wells but a lot of you, especially with bored wells, have already been conserving water.  I have attached the news release and their drought map. For more information please visit the GA EPD website: https://epd.georgia.gov/water-conservation
 
During a Level 2 Drought Response, outdoor landscape watering is only allowed two days a week determined by odd and even-numbered addresses. Even-numbered addresses and properties without numbered addresses may water on Wednesday and Saturday between 4:00 p.m. and 10:00 a.m. Odd-numbered addresses may water Thursday and Sunday between 4:00 p.m. and 10:00 a.m.
 
Prohibited (totally) outdoor water uses include:
 Washing hard surfaces such as streets and sidewalks.
 Water for ornamental purposes, such as fountains.
 The use of fire hydrants, except for firefighting and public safety.
 Non-commercial washing of vehicles.
 Non-commercial pressure washing.
 Fundraising car washes.
 
I hope everyone will take the restrictions seriously. The latest that I have heard regarding rain forecasts is nothing really expected until February of next year.

My apologies for sending out so many notices this week, but the drought is having a huge impact.
  
Susan C James
Agriculture and Natural Resources Agent
UGA Extension-Meriwether County
706-672-4235 Office
706-977-0882 Mobile

Nov. 17 Release from EPD:

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Commissioner Hines completes Leadership Training

 

At the Nov. 9 meeting of the Meriwether Board of Commissioners, Administrator Theron Gay recognized Commissioner Shirley Hines who successfully completed the Regional Economic Leadership Development multi-session program as of November 8, 2016.

 

 

 

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Election Results

Congratulations to our newly elected and re-elected officials:
Chuck Smith, Sheriff
Andrea Peacock, Tax Commissioner
Mary Bray, County Commissioner District 2
FD District and the Fire Protection Bond passed to help improve our Fire Protection in Meriwether County.

Here is a link to Meriwether County election results from the Georgia Secretary of State's Office.

http://results.enr.clarityelections.com/GA/Meriwether/64091/181724/en/summary.html

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UGA Extension Meriwether County ANR E-Newsletter
November 12, 2016

FALL COLOR
Last weekend sourwood trees were at their peak color on the Pine Mountain Trail. The ground was literally pink with them and the leaves that were still on the trees were a beautiful ruby color. If you get the chance check them out this weekend. I was hiking the Wolfden Loop but you can see leaves just south of the Rocky Point parking area off 190. 


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BRASSICA PESTS
Connie Davis shared the image shared here of aphids, possibly Myzus persicae, on the kale that she grows to feed her chickens.

They won’t mind the extra protein and sugars but some humans might. The great thing about these aphids is that they were already being parasitized by braconid wasps. A wasp lays an egg in the aphid and development from larva to pupa to adult will take place inside the aphid-a true body snatcher. Given time the wasps can usually knock down a population, so pesticides aren’t needed. In fact, the use of a broad-spectrum insecticide can worsen the problem because it will also kill beneficials like the braconid wasp. The aphids will bounce back quickly but not the beneficials. In the other images are an aphid that has been parasitized called a “mummy”; a braconid wasp larva that developed inside a mummy; a mummy with the exit hole of a wasp and an emerging wasp.


IN A DIFFERENT GARDEN, false chinch bugs, Nysius raphanus, were feeding on an assortment of greens but were first noticed on mustard greens.

False chinch bugs are usually found feeding on wild mustard and related weeds but the green, succulent cultivated mustard greens make a much better meal than the weeds suffering from drought. Shared are images of a mating pair (image on the net fabric) and the underside of a leave that is turning yellow from their feeding. Other leaves had a grayish cast and the tips of the leaves were rolling under. The bugs were hiding in that rolled up area. Even though they were in high numbers the damage was not at a level to warrant spraying yet. They had moved to all of the various greens in the garden so their population levels need continued monitoring.
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LIVESTOCK
Managing Cattle in Drought Conditions
Monday November 28th, 2016 5:30 PM-9:00 PM
Georgia’s Current Severe Drought Condition and Predictions into 2017
Dr. Pam Knox, University of Georgia Agriculture Climatologist
Managing Nutrition and Forage Quality during Severe Drought
Dr. Jacob Segers, University of Georgia Assistant Professor/Cattle Nutrition
Understanding Diseases and Health Challenges in Drought
Dr. Brenton Credille, University of Georgia College of Veterinary Medicine/Beef Production Management
Navigating Expenses and Tax Challenges
Dr. Levi Russell, University of Georgia Assistant Professor/Agriculture Economist
Carroll County Ag Center/Extension Office
900 Newnan Road
Carrollton, GA 30117
The cost is $10 which includes a meal and reference material. To attend the workshop, please register by November 23. You may register by emailing Richard Littleton at rlittle@uga.edu or calling the Carroll County Extension at 770-836-8546.
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NRCS-EQUIP
The application period is open for the EQIP program for 2017 funding. It will close on Friday, November 18.
While producers can apply year round, this application cutoff announcement is for all general EQIP, as well as some special initiatives such as the Longleaf Pine, On-Farm Energy, Organic, Seasonal High Tunnel, StrikeForce, Working Lands for Wildlife and the North Georgia Irrigation Pilot Project. They can do so by visiting their local USDA Service Center and submitting their Conservation Program Application (NRCS-CPA-1200).
Remember you must have your property on file with the Farm Service Agency in order to qualify for any NRCS program.
For more information on EQIP please visit:
https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/…/main/ga/programs/financial/eqip/
Or you can contact Rory Richardson at 770-251-4283 or rory.richardson@ga.usda.gov
The Farm Service Agency office that serves Meriwether County is in Carrollton at 408 N White St. Their phone number is 770-834-2097. There is a FSA office in Barnesville, GA which may be closer for you but you must make arrangements with the Carrollton office to have your file moved to the Barnesville office.
Although USDA at this time does not have any formal programs that specifically target Veterans they do have the New Farmer program. According to 2010 statistics 45% of veterans came from a rural background so the New Farmer program can help them go back home and start a business. For more information please visit:
https://www.outreach.usda.gov/veterans.htm#
https://newfarmers.usda.gov/veterans
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PESTICIDE LICENSE RE-CERTIFICATION CLASS
Pesticides in the Environment (Movement and Effects)
This training is part of the UGA Pesticide Safety Education Program.
Commercial Category 21 and Private Applicators: 1 Hour Credit
December 5th 7:00-8:00 PM
Greenville Public Library
2323 Gilbert St, Greenville, GA 30222
To register for the class please call our office at 706-672-4235. If you have questions about the class please contact Susan James at scj24262@uga.edu or 706-977-0882
There is no charge for the class.
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4-H PROJECT SAFE
Modified Trap (Shotgun) Team-Meriwether County
Skills for Life - Activity for a Lifetime
Practice for the Meriwether County 4-H Shotgun Team will begin in January, 2017. Any student in the 7th-12th grade can participate in either the Junior or Senior Division. For more information about joining the shotgun team, please contact Terry Strickland at 706-881-2414 or tstrickpig@aol.com. For general information about Project Safe please visit: http://www.georgia4h.org/safe/disciplines/shotgun.htm
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LOCAL MARKET
Strickland Brothers Farm
An assortment of greens is for sale including kale, arugula, collards, turnip greens, mustard greens, spinach and romaine lettuce as well as daikon radish. You can contact Terry at 706-881-2414
Fitzgerald Fruit Farms on Imlac Road outside of Woodbury has started harvesting their fall producing Albion strawberries. They also have a variety of apples for sale. You can contact them at 706-553-2795 or visit www.fitzgeraldfruitfarms.com
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SMALL RUMINANTS
I had a great time last weekend visiting Helen Kraker and her goats.

Helen is partial to Nigerian Dwarf goats. I’m working on scheduling an informal meeting for small ruminant producers. I’ve gotten some feedback from a few folks already. Some of the folks from far away who attended the program last March would like to join us. To make it easier on them I’m looking for a restaurant in the Newnan area (preferably close to I85) to meet at on a Friday night in December. I would appreciate some suggestions for a restaurant and feedback on the preference of a date (December 2, 9, or 16).


Have a great weekend,
Susan
Susan C James
Agriculture and Natural Resources Agent
UGA Extension-Meriwether County
706-672-4235 Office

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All five Meriwether Commissioners receive certification

 

Showing the new display of certificates as “certified commissioners” from the UGA Carl Vinson Institute of Government at the Nov. 2 BOC meeting are, from left, Meriwether County Commissioners Vice Chairman Alfred “Buster” McCoy, Chairman Beth Neely-Hadley, Shirley Hines, Rosla Plant, and Bryan Threadgill.
……………
All five of Meriwether County’s Commissioners -- Chairman Beth Neely-Hadley, Vice Chairman Alfred “Buster” McCoy, Shirley Hines, Rosla Plant, and Bryan Threadgill -- have achieved certification via a training program offered through the University of Georgia’s Carl Vinson Institute of Government in partnership with the Association County Commissioners of Georgia.
The commissioners gathered at the Nov. 2 meeting in front of the display of their certificates from the Carl Vinson Institute.
This nine-course, 66-hour certification gives Meriwether's Commissioners the tools and knowledge needed to lead and be able to make decisions for the greater good in the great county of Meriwether. 
Meriwether County is now fortunate to have all five of its Commissioners certified, making it one of few counties in Georgia to have all presiding Commissioners certified. 
The last two of Meriwether's Commissioners, Commissioner Shirley Hines and Commissioner Rosla Plant were presented certificates for achieving the milestone of Certified County Commissioner at the BOC meeting Aug. 23. On hand to present the certificates were representatives from ACCG and the University of Georgia Carl Vinson Institute of Government. Mr. Mike Plant accepted on behalf of Commissioner Plant as she was home ill that evening.
ACCG is a nonprofit instrumentality of Georgia’s county governments. Formed in 1914 with 19 charter county members, today ACCG serves as the consensus building, training, and legislative organization for all 159 county governments in the state.
With this primary charge, ACCG works to ensure that the counties can provide the necessary leadership, services and programs to meet the health, safety and welfare needs of their citizens.
The Carl Vinson Institute, in partnership with ACCG, offers education courses through the Lifelong Learning Academy for county commissioners to develop and enhance their leadership and governing skills. Academy courses are offered at least once every other year during training programs held in conjunction with regularly scheduled ACCG meetings or as stand-alone sessions. In order to receive credit a person must attend the entire course. Core Certification, the foundation for an elected official’s education as a commissioner, includes nine courses covering 66 hours of required courses. Upon completion officials achieve the status of "Certified County Commissioner."

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Agenda announced for Nov. 9 Meriwether

Board of Commissioners meeting

Below, please see the Agenda for the Meriwether County Board of Commissioners Meeting scheduled for November 9, 2016 at 9:00 am. The meeting will be held at the Administration Building located at 17234 Roosevelt Hwy. Bldg. B, Greenville, GA 30222.
If you have questions or if you need assistance please contact Beverly Thomas at 706-672-3462.
The meeting is open to the Public.

AGENDA
MERIWETHER COUNTY BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS

November 9, 2016
9:00 A.M.


I.    CALL TO ORDER
    INVOCATION
    PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE
    
II.    ADOPT AGENDA
        
III.    MINUTES
1.    October 25, 2016 Work Session
2.    November 2, 2016 Regular Meeting 5:00 pm (October 25, 2016 mtg. was     rescheduled for November 2, 2016 due to power failure)
    
IV.    MUNICIPAL COMMENTS

V.    CONSTITUTIONAL OFFICER’S COMMENTS

VI.    DEPARTMENT HEAD COMMENTS 

VII.     PUBLIC HEARING
1.    Jeffery Hunter request rezone from LDR to RD for property located on Tax Map     #076, Parcel #012-001, LD #8, LL #198 with frontage of 600+ feet with an area     of 6.44 acres. The purpose is for single family homes.

VIII.    OLD BUSINESS
1.    Courthouse Wall Project Bids
2.    Appointment to the Public Facilities Authority

IX.    NEW BUSINESS
1.    Appointment to the Board of Assessors for term ending 12-31-16 (currently filled     by Greg Hobbs)
2.    Presentation from the Meriwether County Airport Authority
3.    Discussion of Lake Meriwether Advisory Board
4.    Discussion of December 27, 2016 meeting

X.    REPORT FROM FINANCE DIRECTOR
1.    Finance Report

XI.    REPORT FROM COUNTY ADMINISTRATOR
    
XII.    REPORT FROM COUNTY COMMISSIONERS

XIII.    REPORT FROM COUNTY ATTORNEY

XIV.    PUBLIC COMMENT

XV.    EXECUTIVE SESSION
Legal
Personnel 
Real Estate 
Tax Matters

XVI.    FUTURE MEETINGS & NOTICES
November 22, 2016 6:00 pm Regular Meeting
November 24-25 Thanksgiving Holidays

XVII.    ADJOURNMENT

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Winning Team honored in Keep Meriwether

Beautiful Oct. 22 Cleanup event

Keep Meriwether Beautiful Winner of the most bags picked up in the Oct. 22 Cleanup event was Team Springfield, led by Margie Hines. Hines and her team of ten volunteers picked up 52 bags of trash during the Great American Cleanup day in Meriwether County on Oct. 22. Here Hines holds her Certificate of Achievement and a beautiful Mum plant that will be planted in the Church yard. For more on how you can get involved with Keep Meriwether Beautiful, contact Jane L. Fryer, President, Meriwether County Development Authority, 17234 Roosevelt Highway, Bldg. B, Greenville, GA 30222. Email her at J.Fryer@meriwethercountyga.gov or call 706/672-3467.

 

Top teams named for Keep Meriwether Beautiful cleanup 

Tyrell Johnson, Director of the Meriwether County Public Works Department, receiving thank you gifts for himself and eight of the public works employees who helped man the container sites for the recent Keep Meriwether Beautiful Great American Cleanup. At right is Keep Meriwether Beautiful director Jane Fryer.

 

 

 

 

 

Meriwether County and Keep Meriwether Beautiful had another successful cleanup day on Saturday, October 22, 2016. This cleanup was a little different from the April cleanup.
Ten dumpsters were placed around the county and volunteers manned the sites from 8:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Employees of the Meriwether County public works department along with public works employees from the City of Manchester and the City of Greenville were assigned to work at each site along with some of the volunteers. Approximately 40 volunteers assisted the public when they brought items to the containers which helped keep everything orderly with no unsightly dumping in the wrong places.
All unmounted tires were taken to the Meriwether County Public Works Department for disposal. In all, 969 tires were collected during the day.
A special recognition for participating teams and county helpers was held the morning of Oct. 31 at the Meriwether Board of Commissioners offices.
Fourteen teams with 104 volunteers picked up 234 bags of trash during the day. Items such as mattresses, televisions, children’s toys, sofas, rugs, washing machines and paint cans were also collected during the day.
Springfield Church was the winner of the most bags of trash picked up with 52 bags. Zion Hill Missionary Church was the winner of the most volunteers on a team with 25 team members.
The Meriwether County Sheriff’s Office has collected more than 580 bags using their Community Service Workers this year.
Participating teams included Manchester Farm & Garden, City of Greenville, Trinity United Methodist Church, Springfield Church, Mountain View Elementary, Zion Hill Missionary Church, City of Luthersville, First Assembly of God, Amy’s Group, Reaves Road Group, Strickland Town Neighbors, Mills Family, Mona Lisa and Child and the Go Get it Team.
Special thanks go to Waste Management, Dependable Waste and C & C Sanitation for providing the containers to each site.
Keep Meriwether Beautiful would like to thank everyone that participated in this cleanup. The next Community Wide Great American Cleanup will be held on Saturday, April 22, 2017.
For more information on how to take part in volunteering with Keep Meriwether Beautiful, please call or email Jane Fryer, 706/672-3467 or J.Fryer@meriwethercountyga.gov

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Latest Georgia Area Labor Profile issued for Meriwether

Here are the latest statistics on jobs and employment for Meriwether County via the Meriwether Industrial Development Authority.

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UGA Extension Meriwether County ANR E-Newsletter
October 29, 2016
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KEEP MERIWETHER BEAUTIFUL-KMB
A great big THANK YOU to everyone who participated in the county wide trash pick-up this past Saturday. Slowly but surely we are making a difference.

I want to thank a few people individually who came to my aid at the Durand Fire Station drop-off. Ric Alexander and Jean Miles both answered my plea for help. Ric made a heroic effort, first thing in the morning, to push sofas out of the dumpster that had been dumped during the night (see image below)! We had five of them and two mattresses filling up the dumpster before we even got started. All furniture was supposed to be placed next to the dumpster. Jean spent the whole afternoon helping folks unload a wide assortment of trash from their vehicles and toss it into the dumpster. Asie Teal, who works for Meriwether County Public Works, volunteered to spend his whole Saturday off helping us too. As I was leaving for the day, Asie and Jane Fryer, KMB Director, were still at work heading off to check on other locations.

There will be a meeting Monday, October 31st at 9:30 AM of the KMB committee to discuss how Saturday went and to award winners in the various trash pick-up categories. If you want to become more involved please join us for the meeting.

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U.S. DROUGHT MONITOR-MERIWETHER COUNTY
Meriwether County was “upgraded” to a level D4-Exceptional Drought this week by the National Drought Mitigation Center, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Most of you understand what a severe drought our growers have been dealing with this year but for a better understanding of the data that goes into making a drought designation please visit: http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/Abo…/ClassificationScheme.aspx
Without the drought designation Meriwether County growers would not have been able to apply for the Livestock Forage Program assistance from USDA FSA. To view the map please visit:
http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/Home/StateDroughtMonitor.aspx…
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NRCS-EQUIP
The Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) in Georgia is soliciting feedback from the Local Work Groups (LWGs) for 2017 Program Delivery of Farm Bill Programs. This open forum is designed for local citizens, stakeholders, and partners to come together and have a voice on how federal funding is spent on a local level for the Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) and other Farm Bill Programs. This meeting is to provide input on the Fiscal Year 2017 funding for the EQIP.
Specifically, NRCS-Georgia is seeking LWG feedback on three items of information: 
1. Propose an Allocation of Funding by Resource Concern
2. Establish Payment Maximums
3. Recommendation on local questions
The Newnan Funding Unit (Coweta, Meriwether, and Troup) Local Work Group Meeting is scheduled Tuesday, November 8, 2016 at 9:30 am at the Troup County Library in Lagrange, GA. The Library’s address is 115 Alford St, LaGrange, GA 30240 and the telephone number is (706) 882-7784. If you have any questions or need any additional information please call or email Rory Richardson at 770-251-4283 or rory.richardson@ga.usda.gov.
For more information on EQIP please visit:
http://www.nrcs.usda.gov/…/national/programs/financial/eqip/
******************************
PESTICIDE LICENSE RE-CERTIFICATION CLASS
Pesticides in the Environment (Movement and Effects)
This training is part of the UGA Pesticide Safety Education Program.
Commercial Category 21 and Private Applicators: 1 Hour Credit
December 5th 7:00-8:00 PM
Greenville Public Library
2323 Gilbert St, Greenville, GA 30222
To register for the class please call our office at 706-672-4235. If you have questions about the class please contact Susan James at scj24262@uga.edu or 706-977-0882
There is no charge for the class.
****************************
4-H PROJECT SAFE
Modified Trap (Shotgun) Team-Meriwether County
Skills for Life - Activity for a Lifetime
Practice for the Meriwether County 4-H Shotgun Team will begin in January, 2017. Any student in the 7th-12th grade can participate in either the Junior or Senior Division. For more information about joining the shotgun team, please contact Terry Strickland at 706-881-2414 or tstrickpig@aol.com. For general information about Project Safe please visit: http://www.georgia4h.org/safe/disciplines/shotgun.htm
******************************
APPLE GRAFTING WORKSHOP
Tuesday, February 21, 2017 from 3:30-6:00 PM
White County Agri-Science Center, Hwy. 129 N., Cleveland, GA
White County Extension is presenting a grafting class with Fruit Specialists Ray Covington and Dario Chavez. Dr. Dave Lockwood, Extension Fruit & Nut Crops Specialist for UT and UGA, will be a special guest speaker.
Supplies will be provided for each participant to graft several apple scions with the appropriate rootstock to take home. If you have a special apple tree you’d like to graft, you may bring your own apple scions; we have directions for collecting and preserving the scions. When you leave this work- shop, you’ll take home 5 apple trees that you have grafted!
There is limited participation, so a $25 non-refundable deposit is required between November 7th and 30th, 2016 in order to reserve your space and supplies. For more information or to register please contact the White County Extension office at
706-865-2832 or uge1311@uga.edu
********************************
INTRODUCTORY BEEKEEPERS CLASS
Chattahoochee Valley Beekeepers Association is offering an Introductory Beekeepers Class beginning February 25, 2017. Classes will be held at the Oxbow Meadows facility at 3535 South Lumpkin Road in Columbus, GA from 2:00-4:00 PM. Cost is $100.00 which includes membership in the association. Students will have the opportunity to order bees. Class size will be limited. Registration is available now by calling Oxbow Meadows Learning Center at 706-507-8550. For a map to the facility please visit: https://oxbow.columbusstate.edu/visitor-information/
For more information about the classes please contact Lewis Higgins at 706-905-9332
********************************
LOCAL MARKET
Wargo’s Pumpkin Patch
2041 Hwy 54
Grantville, GA 30220
(770) 377-8635
Monica and Cory Wargofcak have pumpkins, mums, honey, syrups, ciders and other items for sale at their pumpkin patch. Children (and adults) can play games and take a wagon ride as well as pick out a pumpkin.
Strickland Brothers Farm
Rye seed: 50 lbs. for $16.00
Ryegrass seed: 50 lbs. for $20.00
Hay (alfalfa and Coastal Bermuda with UGA AESL Forage Analysis)
Pinkeye Purplehull, white Crowder peas and sweet potatoes
They also have an assortment of greens for sale including kale, arugula, collards and romaine lettuce. You can contact Terry at 706-881-2414


Fitzgerald Fruit Farms on Imlac Road outside of Woodbury has a variety of apples and locally grown sweet potatoes for sale. You can contact them at 706-553-2795 or visit www.fitzgeraldfruitfarms.com
*****************************
Have a great weekend,
Susan
Susan C James
Agriculture and Natural Resources Agent
UGA Extension-Meriwether County
706-672-4235 Office

......................................

Meriwether County, Oct. 19, 2016 For Immediate Release


 

Meriwether receives state grant

for Manchester mural project

Butterfly gardens to be part

of Rosalyn Carter Butterfly Trail

Meriwether County has just received a grant from the Georgia Council for the Arts to help fund the planned Manchester mural project.
Artist John Christian is working on Meriwether’s “Murals and Monarchs” tourism project. The project has the goal of placing murals in several of Meriwether’s communities, as well as a series of butterfly gardens. So far murals have been completed in Warm Springs, Lone Oak and most recently in Woodbury, and there are butterfly gardens in Warm Springs and Luthersville.

The Georgia Department of Economic Development’s Georgia Council for the Arts (GCA) on Thursday, Oct. 19, announced the recipients of the Vibrant Communities grant. Meriwether County was among 85 entities that received more than $297,963 in funding.

GCA received 112 applications requesting $394,961 from 69 counties across the state. Applicants included libraries, schools, arts centers, cities, historical societies, community theatres, Boys & Girls Clubs, etc. The Vibrant Communities Grant was made available to organizations in counties that did not receive an FY17 Project or Partner Grant.

“Georgia’s communities are filled with great art, inspired artists and bold visions for the ways in which local art can bolster economic development efforts in our communities,” said GCA executive director Karen Paty. “GCA recognizes that a thriving arts community contributes immeasurably to economic and social vitality, and the Vibrant Communities grant is one of the ways in which we support the incredible work happening in our communities.”

According to Carolyn McKinley of Meriwether County Chamber of Commerce and the Together in Meriwether Committee, efforts are also underway on a mural for Meriwether’s county seat of Greenville. Word was just received this week that Publix Charities Foundation will be able to co-sponsor the Greenville mural with a $3,800 grant. The request for funding to support the planned Greenville mural was submitted to the George Jenkins family. Mr. Jenkins was born in Meriwether County and graduated from Greenville High School. He was the founder of the Publix grocery stores.

Other funding for the Greenville mural  came from the same Tourism Product Development Grants, through the Georgia Department of Economic Development, that funded the Woodbury, Warm Springs and Lone Oak murals, McKinley said.

Three separate grants were received from the Tourism Product Development grant program of the Georgia Department of Economic Development. The first was for the butterfly gardens in Warm Springs and Luthersville, then one for the murals in Warm Springs and Lone Oak, with the third being for the murals in Woodbury and Greenville.

“The Georgia Arts Council grant is for Manchester, which will enable us to finish five of our seven murals,” McKinley said.

Also, paperwork was submitted and applications accepted for the Warm Springs and Luthersville Butterfly Gardens that were established this spring to be accepted into the Rosalyn Carter Butterfly Trail. Signage has been ordered.
Georgia Council for the Arts uses Peer Review Panels to adjudicate applications following National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) precedent. Peer Review Panels include GCA Council members; fellow professionals who are experienced in the arts discipline or type of grant being reviewed; or are Georgia citizens with a record of arts activities, experience, and knowledge.

Georgia Council for the Arts (GCA) is a division of the Georgia Department of Economic Development whose mission is to cultivate the growth of vibrant, thriving Georgia communities through the arts. GCA provides grant funding, programs and services statewide that support the vital arts industry, preserve the state’s cultural heritage, increase tourism and nurture strong communities. Funding for Georgia Council for the Arts is provided by appropriations from the Georgia General Assembly and the National Endowment for the Arts. www.gaarts.org

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UGA Extension Meriwether County ANR E-Newsletter
October 21, 2016

BUTTERFLIES IN THE BUTTERFLY GARDEN
 
This past Thursday I finally saw a Monarch butterfly in the Luthersville butterfly garden.

I’ve had people tell me that they’ve seen lots of Monarchs over the summer. I believe that what they were seeing were actually Gulf Fritillary butterflies which have been abundant. They both are orange, black and white but with different wing patterns. The Monarch is the larger of the two. When you see them together it would be difficult to confuse them. Below are images of both; the Gulf Fritillary is above images of the Monarch that I saw on Thursday.
 

****************************************************************************************************
 
NRCS-EQUIP
 
The Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) in Georgia is soliciting feedback from the Local Work Groups (LWGs) for 2017 Program Delivery of Farm Bill Programs. This open forum is design for local citizens; stakeholders; and partners to come together and have a voice on how federal funding is spent on a local level for the Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) and other Farm Bill Programs. This meeting is to provide input on the Fiscal Year 2017 funding for the EQIP.
 
Specifically, NRCS-Georgia is seeking LWG feedback on three items of information: 
1. Propose an Allocation of Funding by Resource Concern
2. Establish Payment Maximums
3.  Recommendation on local questions
 
The Newnan Funding Unit (Coweta, Meriwether, and Troup) Local Work Group Meeting is scheduled Tuesday, November 8, 2016 at 9:30 am at the Troup County Library in Lagrange, GA. The Library’s address is 115 Alford St, LaGrange, GA 30240 and the telephone number is (706) 882-7784. If you have any questions or need any additional information please call or email Rory Richardson at 770-251-4283 or rory.richardson@ga.usda.gov.
 
For more information on EQIP please visit:
http://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/main/national/programs/financial/eqip/
 
****************************************************************************************************
PESTICIDE LICENSE RE-CERTIFICATION CLASS
 
I’m planning a pesticide class for recertification credits. The topic is Pesticides in the Environment (Movement and Effects). This training is part of the UGA Pesticide Safety Education Program.
 
December 5th 7:00-8:00 PM
Greenville Public Library
2323 Gilbert St, Greenville, GA 30222
 
Recertification credit of 1 hour for both private and commercial applicators
 
To register for the class please call our office at 706-672-4235. If you have questions about the class please contact Susan James at scj24262@uga.edu or 706-977-0882
 
****************************************************************************************************
 
TEMPORARY FENCE OPTIONS
 
For an excellent presentation on temporary fencing for cattle, small ruminants, pigs and poultry by John Rogers of NCSU Extension posted on SE Cattle Advisor please visit:
 
http://www.secattleadvisor.com/2016/10/20/archived-webinar-temporary-fence-options-for-small-ruminants-pigs-and-poultry/
 
****************************************************************************************************
 
4-H PROJECT SAFE
Modified Trap (Shotgun) Team-Meriwether County
Skills for Life - Activity for a Lifetime
Practice for the Meriwether County 4-H Shotgun Team will begin in January, 2017. Any student in the 7th-12th grade can participate in either the Junior or Senior Division. For more information about joining the shotgun team, please contact Terry Strickland at 706-881-2414 or tstrickpig@aol.com. For general information about Project Safe please visit: http://www.georgia4h.org/safe/disciplines/shotgun.htm
 
****************************************************************************************************
 
APPLE GRAFTING WORKSHOP
 
Tuesday, February 21, 2017 from 3:30-6:00 PM
White County Agri-Science Center, Hwy. 129 N., Cleveland, GA
White County Extension is presenting a grafting class with Fruit Specialists Ray Covington and Dario Chavez. Dr. Dave Lockwood, Extension Fruit & Nut Crops Specialist for UT and UGA, will be a special guest speaker.
 
Supplies will be provided for each participant to graft several apple scions with the appropriate rootstock to take home. If you have a special apple tree you’d like to graft, you may bring your own apple scions; we have directions for collecting and preserving the scions. When you leave this work- shop, you’ll take home 5 apple trees that you have grafted!
 
There is limited participation, so a $25 non-refundable deposit is required between November 7th and 30th, 2016 in order to reserve your space and supplies. For more information or to register please contact the White County Extension office at
706-865-2832 or uge1311@uga.edu
 
****************************************************************************************************
 
INTRODUCTORY BEEKEEPERS CLASS
 
Chattahoochee Valley Beekeepers Association is offering an Introductory Beekeepers Class beginning February 25, 2017.  Classes will be held at the Oxbow Meadows facility at 3535 South Lumpkin Road in Columbus, GA from 2:00-4:00 PM. Cost is $100.00 which includes membership in the association. Students will have the opportunity to order bees. Class size will be limited. Registration is available now by calling Oxbow Meadows Learning Center at 706-507-8550. For a map to the facility please visit: https://oxbow.columbusstate.edu/visitor-information/
For more information about the classes please contact Lewis Higgins at 706-905-9332
 
***************************************************************************************************
 
LOCAL MARKET
 
Wargo’s Pumpkin Patch
2041 Hwy 54
Grantville, GA 30220
(770) 377-8635
Monica and Cory Wargofcak have pumpkins, mums, honey, syrups, ciders and other items for sale at their pumpkin patch. Children (and adults) can play games and take a wagon ride as well as pick out a pumpkin.
 
Strickland Brothers Farm
Rye: 50 lbs. for $16.00
Ryegrass: 50 lbs. for $20.00
Hay (alfalfa and Coastal Bermuda with UGA AESL Forage Analysis)
Pinkeye Purplehull and white Crowder peas
You can contact Terry at 706-881-2414
 
***************************************************************************************************
 
Have a great weekend,
Susan
 
Susan C James
Agriculture and Natural Resources Agent
UGA Extension-Meriwether County
706-672-4235 Office

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UGA Extension Meriwether County ANR E-Newsletter
October 14, 2016
 
FARM SERVICE AGENCY UPDATE
 
FSA is implementing a process to determine the amount of assistance to provide to producers participating in the Non-insurable Assistance Program (NAP) which provides risk management for hay and grazing losses. Current FSA regulations provide that one of the ways for determining the amount of grazing losses is by obtaining 2 independent assessments from forage specialists.  Dr. Dennis Hancock, UGA Forage Specialist, has agreed to assist the FSA. The grazing losses will be established at the end of the grazing period which is October 31st.  Additionally, the areas for each assessment have yet to be established by the local FSA county committee but will probably be county by county.
 
Dennis has asked county agents, if they believe that there has been hay and grazing losses over 50% in this growing season in their counties, to let him know by the first week of November. I have been in touch with a number of farmers concerning hay and grazing losses this year and believe that there has been over 50% loss in Meriwether County. We will be using my estimates of losses as well as weather data for May 1st through October 31st from the closest UGA weather stations which are in Williamson and Pine Mountain. I looked at the rainfall data from Williamson-12.17 inches rainfall in the 6 month time period so far with the largest amount of 3.61 inches occurring in May. The Pine Mountain station recorded 11.32 inches with 4.54 falling in July. So you can see how variable the rainfall has been within a 40 mile distance which is comprised of mostly Meriwether County. I would not be surprised to learn that there has been less rain in certain areas of Meriwether County, especially the northern half, but will not be able to prove that without reliable data. If any of you have weather station data within Meriwether County please let me know. I have one grower already who is supplying that information but it would be nice to have it from different areas of the county.
 
What I also need from you is information on what your estimated losses have been. You can judge this multiple ways. The easiest, if you cut hay, is the number of bales this year that you were able to cut versus previous years or in some situations, the number of cuttings. Hopefully you will have kept good records. If you are grazing, a record of how much hay or supplemental feeding you’ve had to purchase for this year versus previous years would be helpful. I would like to gather this information even if folks do not have NAP. It can be used to justify the number of Meriwether County farmers who have applied for assistance from the USDA FSA Livestock Forage Program.  I will also make sure that Dennis is aware that we also had at least three generations of fall armyworms damaging hay fields and pastures in Meriwether County this growing season.
 
I must have any information that you are willing to share by the first of November when I will be contacting Dennis. I can be contacted by email at scj24262@uga.edu or by calling 706-977-0882.
 
Also from the Georgia FSA:
Upcoming Acreage Reporting Date for 2017 Perennial Forage and Grass
 
In order to comply with FSA program eligibility requirements, all producers are encouraged to visit their local FSA County office to file an accurate crop certification report by the applicable deadline. Having your acres on file with FSA will expedite any claims that you are making!
 
The upcoming acreage reporting date is applicable for the entire state of Georgia: 
November 15, 2016:  Apiculture, PRF and Perennial Forage (including Grass) with intended use of forage or grazing.
 
NOTE: This deadline for 2017 acreage reporting purposes.   
The following exceptions apply to the above acreage reporting dates: 
If the crop has not been planted by the above acreage reporting date, then the acreage must be reported no later than 15 calendar days after planting is completed. 
If a producer acquires additional acreage after the above acreage reporting date, then the acreage must be reported no later than 30 calendars days after purchase or acquiring the lease. Appropriate documentation must be provided to the county office. 
If a perennial forage crop is reported with the intended use of “cover only,” “green manure,” “left standing,” or “seed,” then the acreage must be reported by July 15th. Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program (NAP) policy holders should note that the acreage reporting date for NAP covered crops is the earlier of the dates listed above or 15 calendar days before grazing or harvesting of the crop begins. For questions regarding crop certification and crop loss reports, please contact your local FSA office.
For more information on FSA programs please visit:
https://www.fsa.usda.gov/state-offices/Georgia/index
 
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OCTOBER POULTRY PROGRAM
 
The class on Tuesday was lots of fun with a hands-on component. Dr. Brian Kiepper demonstrated how to cut up a whole chicken after teaching a session on processing and food safety. Some of the participants were more adroit with the knife and shears than others but everyone enjoyed the activity. Pictured below are Dr. Kiepper, Brenda Backer, Lacey Cohick, Connie Davis, Ron Hill, Larry Moore, Todd Price and Thom Bogle, owner of Bogle Farms.  Thanks for being such an enthusiastic group!
 
 


 
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PESTICIDE LICENSE RE-CERTIFICATION CLASS
 
I’m planning a pesticide class for recertification credits. The topic is Pesticides in the Environment (Movement and Effects). This training is part of the UGA Pesticide Safety Education Program.
 
December 5th 7:00-8:00 PM
Location to be determined
Recertification credit of 1 hour for both private and commercial applicators
 
To register for the class please call our office at 706-672-4235. If you have questions about the class please contact Susan James at scj24262@uga.edu or 706-977-0882
 
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HURRICANE MATTHEW
 
A good friend of mine, Zack Snipes, is the county extension agent for Charleston and Beaufort Counties in SC. He sent pictures that he took last Sunday, the day after Matthew came through his area. What’s really amazing is that some of these crops may actually recover. Others will not. Some of the Sea Islands in this area still have thousands of acres in vegetable production-they haven’t all become wall to wall beach houses, yet. Crops are just as susceptible to damage from storms and hurricanes as those beach houses. And just like the home owners, without paying for crop insurance, a farmer could easily be ruined. If anyone thinks that agriculture is a risk free venture without lots of hard labor they need to think again. Remember these photos next time you buy produce in the store. Every time a farmer plants a crop there is always the chance of loss or failure and 2016 has been a year packing numerous punches.


 
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4-H PROJECT SAFE
Modified Trap (Shotgun) Team-Meriwether County
Skills for Life - Activity for a Lifetime
Practice for the Meriwether County 4-H Shotgun Team will begin in January, 2017. Any student in the 7th-12th grade can participate in either the Junior or Senior Division. For more information about joining the shotgun team, please contact Terry Strickland at 706-881-2414 or tstrickpig@aol.com. For general information about Project Safe please visit: http://www.georgia4h.org/safe/disciplines/shotgun.htm
 
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SUNBELT EXPO
Moultrie, Georgia on Hwy 133
October 18-20th
8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. (Tuesday and Wednesday),
8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. (Thursday)
North America’s largest farm and trade show for farms of all sizes! It has a 600 acre working farm, 300+ seminars and demonstrations and over 1200 exhibitors and vendors. The recipient of the Swisher Sweets/Sunbelt Expo Southeastern farmer of the Year Award will be announced.
Admission is $10 per person / per day (Children 10 and under admitted free w/parent) or $20 for a multi-day admission ticket
For more information please visit: http://sunbeltexpo.com/
 
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LOCAL MARKET
Wargo’s Pumpkin Patch
2041 Hwy 54
Grantville, GA 30220
(770) 377-8635
Monica and Cory Wargofcak have pumpkins, mums, honey, syrups, ciders and other items for sale at their pumpkin patch. Children (and adults) can play games and take a wagon ride as well as pick out a pumpkin.
 
Strickland Brothers Farm
Rye: 50 lbs. for $16.00
Ryegrass: 50 lbs. for $20.00
Hay (alfalfa and Coastal Bermuda) and haylage
Pinkeye Purplehull and white Crowder peas
You can contact Terry at 706-881-2414
 
OTHER COMMUNITY EVENTS
 
 International Professional Rodeo Association
Southeast Region Finals Rodeo at Quercus Farms
October 14th and 15th 8:00 PM
Flat Shoals Road, Gay Georgia 30218
The rodeo benefits veterans through RACE FOR THE WOUNDED: http://raceforthewounded.com/
Tickets go on sale Oct 1st
Tickets are $12; 6 and under free
Get advanced tickets at Shady Days in Gay Arts and Craft Festival on Oct 1st & 2nd for only $10
Come ride a horse before the show. Bring the kids to have their face painted. Lots of food and fun so don't miss out. Gates open at 6 and the action (bareback and saddle bronc riding, barrel racing, bull riding, roping and steer wrestling) starts at 8. Free parking and plenty of bleacher seating will be available.
For more information contact:
Susan Pritchett, SRFR Representative, at 678-603-0038 or susan@srfrodeo.com or visit: http://www.srfrodeo.com/
 
Great American Clean-Up in Meriwether County
Volunteers Needed!
Saturday, October 22nd 8:00 AM-4:00 PM
It’s time to start signing up again! Help Keep Meriwether Beautiful by cleaning up trash around your home or business on this day. For more information please contact Jane Fryer at j.fryer@meriwethercountyga.gov or 706-672-3467.
 
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Local Festivals in October
 
Railroad Days
October 15th Manchester
http://manchester-ga.gov/event/manchester-ga-railroad-days/
 
19th Annual Hogansville Hummingbird Festival
October 15-16th in Hogansville
http://www.hummingbirdfestival.com/festival-season-events.html
 
Fala Day
October 29th at the Little White House in Warm Springs
http://www.stcga.biz/faladay
 
Have a wonderful weekend,
Susan
 
Susan C James
Agriculture and Natural Resources Agent
UGA Extension-Meriwether County
706-672-4235 Office

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UGA Extension Meriwether County ANR E-Newsletter
October 9, 2016

The far reaching impacts of no rain…
One of my biggest adjustments in coming to work in Meriwether County as the ANR Extension Agent was accepting that irrigation for crops was extremely limited. Where I worked in SC before coming to Georgia, irrigation was more the norm than dry land farming. Farmers were able to get through periods of drought without too much hardship. That is not the case here. There are a few Meriwether growers producing vegetables and strawberries using annual plasticulture and drip tape. An even smaller number of producers have pivots for row crops, pastures and turf.
So many aspects of cultivating crops are dependent upon having moisture in or on the soil. Fertilizing, liming, seeding, transplanting, tillage, herbicide applications, bedding are some of the more critical ones. Strawberry producers this fall, despite having irrigation, have faced difficulty in making beds out of soil that is dry as dust. Once beds are created and covered with plastic, the only way to wet the soil is through drip tape. It is extremely difficult to do and some of the growers have had their irrigation running 24 hours for days. I know a lot of home gardeners abandoned their vegetable gardens early on this summer for fear of running their wells dry. It looks like they won’t be planting a fall garden either, which is a shame because there are so many cool-season crops that we can grow.
Livestock producers are facing not having enough hay or pasture for their cattle, sheep and goats. I know one grower who has already made a trip to Florida for perennial peanut hay and another who is considering sending his cattle back to Oklahoma where there has been more rain! And what about a clean water source for watering livestock? In many fields the ponds are dropping to a critical low level. Some growers would normally have already over-seeded their Bermuda pastures with ryegrass by now, but not this year without rain. Folks who sent in soil samples should not be putting out the recommended lime or fertilizer without rain. It’s time for pre-emergent herbicide applications in pastures and turfgrass but not without rain to activate the herbicides. Let’s pray that the weeds are held back by the drought also.
Basically we are all in limbo waiting and it looks like will be waiting for some time. The National Weather Service’s three month outlook has the drought persisting through the end of the year. Farmers are some of the most resilient folks I know-they expect adversity-but this year has been a constant challenge. It has been one of the worst I’ve known, and not just because of the drought. Pest pressures have been exceptionally high since temperatures warmed up in the spring. My pests of the week segment addressed only a few that were present. If Mother Nature’s goal was to break in the new county agent she has done a mighty fine job. I could go on and on about the impacts of the drought but for now, since we don’t really have an option, we should enjoy the beautiful blue skies and cooler temperatures but please keep praying for our farmers and for rain.
USDA Water and Climate Update October 6, 2016:
http://www.wcc.nrcs.usda.gov/…/s…/drought/dmrpt-20161006.pdf
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G.A.T.E. (Georgia Ag Tax Exemption)
Wes Pope, GATE Compliance Officer for the West Central region of Georgia, spoke at the Meriwether County Farm Bureau Federation annual meeting and dinner last Thursday. He will be in the area visiting businesses to share information concerning the GATE card. If you are not certain about an item’s exemption status you can reach Wes at Wesley.Pope@agr.georgia.gov or 404-656-1262.
THE FOLLOWING ITEMS ARE NOT FARM INPUTS; SALES TAX MUST BE COLLECTED
•Clothes, boots, and other apparel.
•Food and drinks for human consumption.
•Concrete pads, barns, greenhouses, strand metal buildings, and other buildings (other than grain bins). These structures are considered real property.
•Gasoline or on-road (clear, non-dyed) diesel, including aviation gasoline.
•Plants, fertilizer, pine straw, and other inputs used for aesthetic/landscaping purposes.
•Pet food and supplies for domestic animals including dogs, cattle/herding dogs, cats, birds, etc.
•Energy, cell phones or supplies used for residential/administrative purposes.
•Any motorized vehicles designed for on-road use.
•Replacement parts for on-road use motor vehicles.
•Property or fixtures attached to barns, greenhouses, and other metals buildings such as electrical wiring, HVAC, windows, and doors. These are considered real property.
•Guns, ammunition, hunting supplies, etc.
•ATVs and off-road vehicles not used for ag purposes.
•Crushed rock/gravel for road or path construction.
•Fish used for aesthetic or weed/algae control for pond irrigation (Koi, Grass Carp, etc.)
•Animals that are not cattle, hogs, sheep, other livestock, poultry, or bees.
•Shipping or freight on items that are not qualified as tax exempt ag inputs.
For more information please visit: https://forms.agr.georgia.gov/gate/
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LIVESTOCK and FORAGES
There’s still time to sign up for the Calving Techniques Class presented by Dr. Lee Jones, UGA College of Veterinary Medicine tomorrow evening, October 10th, starting at 6:30 PM at Lemmon Cattle Enterprises at 16810 Woodbury Hwy, Woodbury, GA 30293. Lee will be teaching simple calving-difficulty assistance techniques. He will also talk about lambing and kidding difficulties for those who are interested, so small ruminant folks should attend also! Coffee, drinks and snacks will be available. This class is free.
To pre-register please call our office at 706-672-4235 or for more information please contact Susan James at scj24262@uga.edu
Meriwether County Cattlemen’s Association Monthly Meeting
Tuesday, October 11th 7:30 PM
New location: Blackbird Café in Woodbury 18118 Main Street
To renew your membership or start a new one please visit: http://www.georgiacattlemen.org/join.aspx
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POULTRY CLASSES
Backyard Poultry Flock Management Program
The first class is over but you can still sign up for the next two.
Tuesday, October 11th from7:00-8:30 PM
Dr. Brian Kiepper, UGA Poultry Science Department 
Meat Chicken Processing and Food Safety
Tuesday, October 18th from7:00-8:30 PM
Dr. Claudia Dunkley, UGA Poultry Science Department 
Bird Behavior, Housing and Management, Layer Production
Bogle Farms 
1785 Harman Road
Greenville, GA, 30222
Cost:
$10 per single session class (includes course material but no certificate)
Coffee, drinks and snacks will be available.
To register please contact the Meriwether County Extension office at
706-672-4235 or uge2199@uga.edu
As a follow up to the Poultry classes, Brian Maddy, ANR Agent for Troup County, will be teaching a class on chicken coop design in November, tentative date of the 29th. I will keep you posted…
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PESTICIDE LICENSE RE-CERTIFICATION CREDITS
I’m hoping to schedule some classes before the end of the year. The emphasis will probably be on safety or pesticide mode of action and resistance issues. If there is a particular topic that you believe needs to be addressed please let me know at scj24262@uga.edu
You can check on your license and recertification hours by visiting GDA’s website: http://agr.georgia.gov/1pesticide-applicator-licensing-and-…
Both private and commercial licenses are good for a five year period. Private applicators must obtain three (3) re-certification credit hours in order to renew their license; commercial applicators must obtain either six (6) or ten (10). All re-certification credit hours must be received in the Georgia Department of Agriculture Pesticide Division office at least 90 days prior to the expiration of a license. An applicator can also retake an exam, private or commercial, to renew the license.
To get a private applicators license in Meriwether County please visit: http://ugaextension.org/…/agriculture-and-natural-resources…
Scroll down the page until you reach the heading “Georgia Commercial and Private Pesticide Licenses” and click where it says online. Read and follow all directions. If you have difficulties in accessing a computer or printer please contact us in the office at 706-672-4235 and we will get you set up.
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4-H Project S.A.F.E. 
Modified Trap (Shotgun) Team-Meriwether County
Skills for Life - Activity for a Lifetime
Practice for the Meriwether County 4-H Shotgun Team will begin in January, 2017. Any student in the 7th-12th grade can participate in either the Junior or Senior Division. For more information about joining the shotgun team, please contact Terry Strickland at 706-881-2414 or tstrickpig@aol.com. For general information about Project Safe please visit: http://www.georgia4h.org/safe/disciplines/shotgun.htm
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Egg Candling
The Egg Candling class this past Friday was a success. Ben Pitts, with the Georgia Department of Agriculture, did a great job. This class was Ben’s next to the last one for 2016. He will not be teaching any more until possibly January or February of 2017. I know some of the folks who missed this class were wondering when the next class would be. I will stay in touch with Ben about having another class in early 2017 and let you know as soon as we have scheduled another.
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LOCAL MARKET
Wargo’s Pumpkin Patch
2041 Hwy 54
Grantville, GA 30220
(770) 377-8635
Monica and Cory Wargofcak have pumpkins, mums, honey, syrups, ciders and other items for sale at their pumpkin patch. Children (and adults) can play games and take a wagon ride as well as pick out a pumpkin. There were hundreds of folks having a blast this past Saturday morning while I was there.
Strickland Brothers Farm has seed for sale.
Rye: 50 lbs. for $16.00
Ryegrass: 50 lbs. for $20.00
You can contact Terry at 706-881-2414
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OTHER COMMUNITY EVENTS
International Professional Rodeo Association
Southeast Region Finals Rodeo at Quercus Farms
October 14th and 15th 8:00 PM
Flat Shoals Road, Gay Georgia 30218
The rodeo benefits veterans through RACE FOR THE WOUNDED: http://raceforthewounded.com/
Tickets go on sale Oct 1st
Tickets are $12; 6 and under free
Get advanced tickets at Shady Days in Gay Arts and Craft Festival on Oct 1st & 2nd for only $10
Come ride a horse before the show. Bring the kids to have their face painted. Lots of food and fun so don't miss out. Gates open at 6 and the action (bareback and saddle bronc riding, barrel racing, bull riding, roping and steer wrestling) starts at 8. Free parking and plenty of bleacher seating will be available.
For more information contact:
Susan Pritchett, SRFR Representative, at 678-603-0038 or susan@srfrodeo.com or visit: http://www.srfrodeo.com/
Great American Clean-Up in Meriwether County
Volunteers Needed!
Saturday, October 22nd 8:00 AM-4:00 PM
It’s time to start signing up again! Help Keep Meriwether Beautiful by cleaning up trash around your home or business on this day. For more information please contact Jane Fryer at j.fryer@meriwethercountyga.gov or 706-672-3467.
*********************
Local Festivals in October
Railroad Days
October 15th Manchester
http://manchester-ga.gov/event/manchester-ga-railroad-days/
19th Annual Hogansville Hummingbird Festival
October 15-16th in Hogansville
http://www.hummingbirdfestival.com/festival-season-events.h…
Fala Day
October 29th at the Little White House in Warm Springs
http://www.stcga.biz/faladay

Have a wonderful week,
Susan

Susan C James
Agriculture and Natural Resources Agent
UGA Extension-Meriwether County
706-672-4235 Office

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Funds donated to help KMB Fall Cleanup

Kevin Wiley, Manager of the local Georgia Power Company presents a check for $500 to Keep Meriwether Beautiful for the Great American Cleanup on Saturday, Oct. 22 from 8 a.m. – 4 p.m.  Pictured are: Kevin Wiley, Manager, Georgia Power presenting check to Carla Snider, Chairman of Keep Meriwether Beautiful, Jane Fryer, Director of KMB and Dan Morgan, Vice Chairman of Keep Meriwether Beautiful. 

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Countywide information meetings scheduled on

proposed Meriwether County Fire District referendum

 

Several information meetings are scheduled to discuss the proposed Meriwether County Fire District referendum that will be on the Nov. 8 ballot.

Upcoming meetings are: Oct. 13, 7 p.m., Trinity UMC in Durand; Oct. 20, 6 p.m., Greenville Presbyterian Church; Oct. 20, TBA, Branch Hebron Church in Odessadale.

These are part of a series of public information meetings being held throughout the county through September and October to allow citizens to learn about the fire district proposal and ask questions.

 

Referendum Nov. 8 on Meriwether County Fire District proposal

Meriwether citizens are being asked to vote on establishing a Fire District to enhance fire and emergency service throughout Meriwether County.  It would include funding for maintenance, operation and staffing of the Meriwether County Fire Dept.

The Fire District would include the entire area of unincorporated Meriwether County and the cities of Gay, Greenville, Lone Oak, Luthersville, Warm Springs and Woodbury. Funding would be via a levy of a dedicated millage rate on all properties subject to taxation, not to exceed three mills in any given tax year.

The fire district referendum will be in conjunction with the Nov. 8 General Election. Polls will be open 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Registration deadline to vote in the General Election is Oct. 11.

THE FIRE DISTRICT PROPOSAL is for a joint program between Meriwether County and the cities of Gay, Greenville, Lone Oak, Luthersville, Warm Springs, and Woodbury, Ga.

It is designed to enhance fire and emergency service throughout Meriwether County.

OVERVIEW OF CURRENT MERIWETHER FIRE DEPARTMENT

The current Meriwether County Fire Department has 13 total stations, but only four are manned by firefighters or Emergency Medical Service personnel. The balance are volunteer stations.

The county's Fire/Rescue volunteers are great, but not always available due to work, vacation and family responsibilities.

The current Meriwether Fire Department Budget excluding EMS is approx. $98,000/year. Out of those funds, the county has to maintain stations, repair trucks and equipment, as well as fuel and provide tires for trucks.

EQUIPMENT

Looking at the county’s present equipment, current trucks range in age from late 1960s to around 2003. Meriwether's newest trucks are about 14 years old. Parts are hard to find and often very expensive. Trucks, even with constant maintenance, are not as reliable as county officials would like.

Currently, no capital funds are available to update or replace aging equipment. Special Purpose Local Option Sales Tax – or SPLOST -- funds for capital are not available until after 2020.

In addition to aging equipment, many of Meriwether County's stations are in need of repair. Three stations aren’t even equipped with running water or plumbing.

GOALS TO IMPROVE FIRE SERVICES

The fire district proposal has several goals to improve fire services.

The fire district has to be approved by the voters.

Goals include:

  • Establish an ongoing funding source for the Fire Department, dedicated to be used exclusively for Fire Services.
  • Provide for station improvements and/or replacement.
  • Equipment upgrades and replacement.
  • Full-time staffing.
  • Would include a bond component to jump-start the implementation of the program.
  • Bond funds would be used for new trucks, equipment, and construction of new and/or remodeling of existing stations.

THE PLAN

With the fire district and bonds in place, the Fire Rescue coverage in Meriwether would be increased.

Some existing stations would become substations, but fire trucks and equipment will remain at those locations to further enhance the county’s fire service coverage.

Maps are available to show how coverage would be increased.

TIMELINE:

  • On Ballot Nov. 8, 2016 for decision by voters.
  • If approved, bond funding will be available Spring 2017.
  • Fire District collection would begin October 2017.
  • Goal of 11 fully manned and operational stations January 2018.

COST OF PROGRAM:

  • Meriwether County must have funding to continue to provide fire services.
  • Voter approved Fire District funding will assure collected funds will be used only for fire services.
  • Fire District funding will be in the form of Ad Valorem taxes, but the rate will be capped at a maximum of 3 mils for the Fire District taxes, plus the Fire Bonds.

 

ESTIMATED COST TO PROPERTY OWNERS

FIRE DISTRICT at 2.5 mils rate

Example for $100,000 property:

$100,000.00 Appraised value of home or property

     x  40% Assessment Level

 $40,000 Assessment

 -  2,000 Homestead Exemption

 $38,000 New Assessment

    x  2.5 Mils

       $95 Per year

    $7.92 Per month

     $.26  Per day

 

FIRE BOND

  • $3,500,000 Bond for 15 year term
  • To be used for new equipment purchase and station renovation and construction

       $282,700 - Annual Debt Service

                        (based on current interest rates)

      divided by $470,000  =  .600 mils

 

Same Property

$40,000 Net Assessment

       x .6    Mils

      $24.00 Per year

         $2.00 Per month

          $ .06 Per day

Total Property $100,000

$119.00 Per year

    $9.92 Per month

       $.32 Per day

 

Some questions and answers to consider:

 

Why consider a Bond?

  • Will allow new equipment to be purchased and new stations to be constructed in 2017.
  • Will allow for much faster full implementation of this program.
  • Will bring program fully online by early 2018.
  • Interest rates are at historically low rates.
  • Will guard against inflation of equipment, building materials, and labor cost.
  • Bond mil rates will decline over time as Meriwether County grows.

 

What do I get for my investment?

  • 7 additional fully manned Fire Stations
  • Not only provide fire protection, but will serve as First Responders to medical calls and accidents
  • Medical calls and accidents comprise 80+% of the Fire Service calls
  • Faster response time
  • Paid staff assures someone is always on duty
  • New updated equipment
  • New and updated facilities
  • Will still continue with a strong volunteer program, but with better equipment and facilities
  • May improve ISO rating, which can reduce property insurance cost.

 

  • New, fully manned stations will become part of the community, ready to offer assistance as needed.
  • Provide jobs for our community.
  • Work with schools and students.
  • A strong Public Safety program is critical to Meriwether County’s future growth and prosperity, attracting more growth and economic development as well as more industrial and commercial prospects.
  • Very affordable program.
  • Bottom Line, we must do something about our Fire Services.  The longer we wait the more the cost.

 

Meriwether County citizens are asked to remember to vote in the Nov. 8, 2016 General Election and the Fire District referendum.

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UGA Extension Meriwether County ANR E-Newsletter
September 30, 2016

REMINDERS
Important reminder for folks signed up for the Calving Class - the date has been changed to October 10th!
For those of you signed up for the Egg Candling Class don’t forget that you must have a signed and notarized affidavit of legal residence to get your certificate. We can have the form notarized in our office.
The Poultry Classes start next Tuesday. You can sign up for any or all of the offered classes.
Information about all of the classes is further below in the e-newsletter.
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LIVESTOCK and FORAGES
This article is a reprint from the July 18th e-newsletter but the information may be even more critical now since the drought has continued.
Potential Hay Replacement Rations
UGA Beef Specialist, Lawton Stewart, spoke at the Cattlemen’s meeting July 12th on potential hay replacement rations for cattle. Here’s what he had to say:
What if hay is not available? The key is to develop a ration that meets the nutrient requirements of the cows.
· The stage of production of your herd is critical to knowing exactly what to feed. 
· Table 1 lists some example rations to use for different stages of production.


Consider early weaning to reduce the nutrient requirements of the brood cows.
Utilize a roughage source such as wheat straw, cottonseed hulls, crop residue, grazing drought stressed crops, gin trash.
Examples of energy and/or byproduct feed include: grains such as corn, oats, etc., soybean hulls, citrus pulp, wheat middlings, hominy.
Examples of protein feed include: soybean meal, cottonseed meal, corn gluten feed, dried distillers grains, whole cottonseed
Is buying hay the economic choice?
ALWAYS, ALWAYS, ALWAYS ask for a forage analysis and/or test the hay before purchasing it. If not, you may be paying a premium for something that will not meet the requirements of your cows.
Take into consideration the cost of the supplement AND hay.
Also, take into consideration the method of feeding hay. If hay is not fed in a ring or other way to minimize lost, hay losses can be as high as 30%, or more.
Table 2 compares the cost of buying hay versus feeding a hay replacement diet


Note that if hay is being wasted, it is more economical to buy a replacement ration. This point is not necessarily to steer you towards the feed but to show the value of proper handling of purchased hay
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Cattle Parasite Control
The UGA Veterinary Teaching Hospital has a really good article “Parasite Control in Southeastern Cattle Herds” by Sydney Crosby, DVM and Brent Credille, DVM in the September issue of their Beef and Dairy Cattle Newsletter. In a study done at UGA, the correct use of dewormers had a big impact on cow pregnancy rates at two 100 cow farms. On the farm where dewormers were used the pregnancy rate was 97%. On the farm where dewormers were not used the pregnancy rate was 75%. The difference in profit for the two farms was $14,300.
Their recommendations for Deworming Cattle on a Cow-calf Operation are below:
· Market Calves
-Deworm 2-4 weeks prior to weaning
§ Use combination white paste dewormer (Synanthic, Safequard, Valbazen) and injectable dewormer (Dectmax, Cydectin, Ivomec)
· Replacement Heifers
-Deworm 2-4 weeks prior to weaning
§ Use combination white paste dewormer (Synanthic, Safequard, Valbazen) and injectable dewormer (Dectmax, Cydectin, Ivomec)
-Deworm prior to breeding
§ Use combination white paste dewormer (Synanthic, Safequard, Valbazen) and injectable dewormer (Dectmax, Cydectin, Ivomec)
-Deworm prior to calving
§ Use injectable dewormer (Dectmax, Cydectin, Ivomec)
· Mature Cows
-Deworm prior to calving
§ Use injectable dewormer (Dectmax, Cydectin, Ivomec)
- If deworming prior to calving is not possible , deworm during midsummer
§ Leave 10% of the heaviest cows untouched with dewormer to slow resistance development
§ Use injectable dewormer (Dectmax, Cydectin, Ivomec)
· Bulls
-Deworm prior to breeding season at time of breeding soundness exam
§ Use injectable dewormer (Dectmax, Cydectin, Ivomec)
To sign up to receive the UGA Veterinary Teaching Hospital Cattle Newsletter “From the Field” please visit: http://uga.us2.list-manage1.com/subscribe…
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PESTS OF THE WEEK
If you have started planting a fall garden you probably have brassicas in it. There are a number of lepidopteran (butterflies and moths) pests that love cabbage, collards, kale, broccoli and other greens.

The larva of the diamond-back moth (Plutella xylostella) is especially fond of collards and it is the number one world-wide pest of this crop. It is known to have developed resistance to multiple insecticides here in Georgia so management in commercial production can be difficult. Also found on brassicas are the imported cabbageworm butterfly (Pieris rapae), the cabbage looper (Trichoplusia ni), the cabbage webworm (Hellula rogatalis) and occasionally some of the armyworms and the corn earworm.

Although the diamondback moth is the most serious of these pests, one diamondback caterpillar does much less damage than some of the other caterpillars because it is much smaller. A last-instar diamondback larva will be around ½ inch long. The other caterpillar species will be from 1-2 inches long.
Since this has been a really bad year for insect pests I am expecting to see lots of caterpillars on brassica crops. While scouting cabbage plants last week a grower and I found corn earworms, diamondback moth larvae and beet armyworms in high numbers. Insecticides recommended for these pests are Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), spinosad, numerous pyrethroids and esfenvalerate. Scout weekly looking on the underside of the leaves and in the crown of the plants. For a complete list of insecticides please visit: http://www.ent.uga.edu/…/GA-Pest-Management-2016-Home-VEGET…
While working with commercial collard growers in SC I created a lepidopteran pest scouting guide. If you are interested I can email you a pdf copy.
**********************
4-H Project S.A.F.E. 
Modified Trap (Shotgun) Team-Meriwether County
Skills for Life - Activity for a Lifetime
Practice for the Meriwether County 4-H Shotgun Team will begin in January, 2017. Any student in the 7th-12th grade can participate in either the Junior or Senior Division. For more information about joining the shotgun team please contact Terry Strickland at 706-881-2414 or tstrickpig@aol.com. For general information about Project Safe please visit: http://www.georgia4h.org/safe/disciplines/shotgun.htm
**********************
LIVESTOCK and FORAGES CLASS
Calving Techniques Class
Presented by Dr. Lee Jones, UGA College of Veterinary Medicine
October 10th starting at 6:30 PM
Lemmon Cattle Enterprises at 16810 Woodbury Hwy, Woodbury, GA 30293
Lee will be teaching simple calving-difficulty assistance techniques. He will also talk about lambing and kidding difficulties for those who are interested, so small ruminant folks should attend also! Coffee, drinks and snacks will be available. This class is free.
To pre-register please call our office at 706-672-4235 or for more information please contact Susan James at scj24262@uga.edu
**********************
POULTRY CLASSES
Backyard Poultry Flock Management Program
Tuesday, October 4th from7:00-8:30 PM
Dr. Casey Ritz, UGA Poultry Science Department 
Basic Management, Breed Selection, and Disease Prevention
Tuesday, October 11th from7:00-8:30 PM
Dr. Brian Kiepper, UGA Poultry Science Department 
Meat Chicken Processing and Food Safety
Tuesday, October 18th from7:00-8:30 PM
Dr. Claudia Dunkley, UGA Poultry Science Department 
Bird Behavior, Housing and Management, Layer Production
Bogle Farms 
1785 Harman Road
Greenville, GA, 30222
Cost:
$20 for attending all 3 classes (includes all course materials and a certificate, if all classes are attended)
$10 per single session class (includes course material but no certificate)
Coffee, drinks and snacks will be available.
To register please contact the Meriwether County Extension office at 706-672-4235 or uge2199@uga.edu
As a follow up to the Poultry classes, Brian Maddy, ANR Agent for Troup County, will be teaching a class on chicken coop design in November, tentative date of the 29th. I will keep you posted…
Egg Candling Class
Friday, October 7th from 10:00 AM-3:00 PM
Georgia Department of Agriculture: Ben Pitts, Instructor
Manchester Public Library Meeting Room
218 Perry Street ~ Manchester, GA
If you plan to sell your eggs to individuals, or at a farmers market, an egg candling certificate from the Georgia Department of Agriculture is required.
The class will last about four hours, including one hour of classroom instruction, followed by a written examination and a hands-on candling examination.
There will be a one-hour lunch break on your own. The class is free and open to any interested Georgia resident.
To pre-register for the class and to get a copy of the required affidavit of lawful presence, please call the Meriwether County Extension office at 706-672-4235.
If you have any questions please contact Susan James at scj24262@uga.edu or Ben Pitts at Benjamin.Pitts@agr.georgia.gov
************************
USDA
The USDA NASS released the 2016 statistics for Georgia Small Grains today.
You can access them at:
https://www.nass.usda.gov/…/Geo…/Publications/Crop_Releases/
The USDA NRCS Weekly Water and Climate Update is available at:
http://www.wcc.nrcs.usda.gov/…/s…/drought/dmrpt-20160929.pdf
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HOW’S YOUR INTERNET SERVICE?
UGA Extension has been asked to help get residents in rural Georgia to complete a survey about the availability of high speed internet. The survey is part of a study being conducted by the Carl Vincent Institute of Government for the Georgia General Assembly.
The goal is to get rural Georgians to visit the website http://broadband.georgia.gov/ to:
1. View what access is currently reported as available in their area;
2. Perform a recorded speed test if they currently have broadband access; and, 
3. Complete a brief survey about broadband availability at their home and/or business.
***********************
LOCAL MARKET
Strickland Brothers Farm has seed for sale.
Rye: 50 lbs. for $16.00
Ryegrass: 50 lbs. for $20.00
You can contact Terry at 706-881-2414
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OTHER COMMUNITY EVENTS
International Professional Rodeo Association
Southeast Region Finals Rodeo at Quercus Farms
October 14th and 15th 8:00 PM
Flat Shoals Road, Gay Georgia 30218
The rodeo benefits veterans through RACE FOR THE WOUNDED: http://raceforthewounded.com/
Tickets go on sale Oct 1st
Tickets are $12; 6 and under free
Get advanced tickets at Shady Days in Gay Arts and Craft Festival on Oct 1st & 2nd for only $10
Come ride a horse before the show. Bring the kids to have their face painted. Lots of food and fun so don't miss out. Gates open at 6 and the action (bareback and saddle bronc riding, barrel racing, bull riding, roping and steer wrestling) starts at 8. Free parking and plenty of bleacher seating will be available.
For more information contact:
Susan Pritchett, SRFR Representative, at 678-603-0038 or susan@srfrodeo.com or visit: http://www.srfrodeo.com/
Great American Clean-Up in Meriwether County
Volunteers Needed
Saturday, October 22nd 8:00 AM-4:00 PM
It’s time to start signing up again! Help Keep Meriwether Beautiful by cleaning up trash around your home or business on this day.
We have sign-up forms on our table outside our office or you can contact me at scj24262@uga.edu and I will email them to you.
Local Festivals in October
The Cotton Pickin’ Fair
October 1st and 2nd in Gay
www.cpfair.org
Shady Days
October 1st and 2nd in Gay
http://www.shadydaysingay.com/
Annual Harvest Hoe Down Festival
October 8-9th in Warm Springs
http://www.warmspringsga.us/harvesthoedownoctober.htm
Railroad Days
October 15th Manchester
http://manchester-ga.gov/event/manchester-ga-railroad-days/
19th Annual Hogansville Hummingbird Festival
October 15-16th in Hogansville
http://www.hummingbirdfestival.com/festival-season-events.h…
Fala Day
October 29th at the Little White House in Warm Springs
http://www.stcga.biz/faladay
I hope everyone enjoys the fall weather this weekend,
Susan

Susan C James
Agriculture and Natural Resources Agent
UGA Extension-Meriwether County
706-672-4235 Office

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2016 Meriwether County TEEN MAZE held Sept. 23

Commissioner Shirley Hines with one of the youth participants at 2016 Meriwether County TEEN MAZE.

The 2016 Meriwether County TEEN MAZE event was held Friday, Sept. 23, from 8 a.m.-2 p.m. at the old Greenville Middle School auditorium.

TEEN MAZE is an organization that promotes awareness about various issues and problems facing adolescents within the community.  Ninth graders navigate through a life-size maze that offers real life choices in order to discover the consequences of their behaviors.

Teen Maze is designed to allow young people the opportunity to explore life-like situations and their consequences without real life permanency. Along the path, teenagers draw their fate out of a bag as professionals in their field of expertise present information to students.
The purpose of the TEEN MAZE is to show the Meriwether County youth how the decisions they make now have long lasting effects on their lives and the lives of people around them. Consequences include pregnancy, sexually transmitted diseases, parenthood, DUI, texting, etc.
There are many stations in the maze. Dating experiences, pregnancy, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd trimesters, Baby Station, Childcare, Bank, Adoption Agency, STD Station, Drugstore, Alcohol, Drugs, Career Center, Graveyard and Graduation are only a few of the stations. Other stations include Mock Wreck, Drunk Driving, Mock ER, and Judicial Stations.
The ultimate goal of TEEN MAZE is to stimulate the teens to think about the potential consequences of their choices before acting. By doing this, the students have a better chance of reaching their ultimate goal in high school which is timely high school graduation.
TEEN MAZE is community-wide event incorporating youth, adults and parents, all working together to create healthy youth opportunities. Many volunteers are needed to assist with the event.
The student surveys reflect the teens wanting factual information to assist with making better choices. The mission of TEEN MAZE is to show positive behavior changes.

For more information contact those who helped coordinate volunteers registration for the event: Lisa Parker at 706-672-1118 or lparker@pathwayscsb.org or Susan James at scj24262@uga.edu .

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Economic Impact of Ga. Tourism

Industry Hits Record $58.9 Billion

Gov. Nathan Deal Sept. 14 announced that Georgia’s tourism industry generated a record $58.9 billion economic impact in the last year at the 2016 Georgia Governor’s Tourism Conference in College Park.

Deal recognized several of the state’s top tourism professionals at the annual industry event, which was hosted by the Georgia Department of Economic Development (GDEcD) and the Georgia Association of Convention & Visitors Bureaus.
 
“Tourism has become one of Georgia's top economic generators, as the industry supports more than 439,000 jobs and surpassed $58.9 billion in economic impact last year,” said Deal. “In 2015 alone, a record 100 million visitors came to Georgia to explore our mountains, beaches, big cities and small towns. With a thriving tourism sector and new attractions coming across the state, I have no doubt that next year will follow the trend of exceeding our expectations.”
 
“A growing, healthy tourism industry is critical to creating a pro-business climate in Georgia by improving our quality of life, accommodations, transportation, arts and entertainment,” said GDEcD Commissioner Chris Carr. “Today we celebrate our dedicated tourism partners from across the state for their contributions to the industry and for ensuring our destinations are on the minds of travelers around the world.”
 
The Governor’s Tourism Conference provides an opportunity to educate members of the tourism industry about travel-and tourism-related issues on a national and statewide level, focusing on emerging trends, current tourism efforts and future initiatives. The 2017 conference will take place Sept. 10 – Sept. 13 in Jekyll Island.


Year of Film

For those who have not yet heard, 2017 will be the Year of Georgia Film for promotions by the Georgia Department of Economic Development. State officials are currently working on the overall plan, and there will be partner opportunities as 2017 draws closer and throughout the year.

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Rasnick now Municipal Judge for Luthersville

John Rasnick, Meriwether County Probate Judge was sworn in as Municipal Judge for the City of Luthersville 09/13/2016 at the Luthersville City Council meeting.

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Keep Meriwether Beautiful planning

for Oct. 22 countywide cleanup

KMB volunteers and officials at the April 2016 cleanup. Another countywide cleanup is planned for Oct. 22 and registration is under way.

 

The Keep Meriwether Beautiful committee is making plans for a fall countywide cleanup day on Saturday, Oct. 22 from 8 a.m. – 4 p.m.

Church, school and community teams are encouraged to register. Awards including a plaque, recognition and photo in the newspaper will be awarded to teams that have the most members on a team and an award will be given for the most bags of trash picked up. An honor system will be in place and KMB asks that all teams be honest about the numbers of volunteers and bags picked up, said Jane Fryer, President, Meriwether County Development Authority and coordinator for KMB.

This event will be managed a little different from the April cleanup event. Containers will be placed in 11 locations in each city. KMB is seeking volunteers to work in two-hour shifts at each location from 8 a.m. - 4 p.m. to make sure the bags of trash are placed in the containers with a place for large items such as mattresses, TVs or furniture to be placed to the side of the container.   

Dumpster locations are Alvaton Fire Station, Durand Fire Station, Gay Fire Station, and Greenville behind the probation office, Lone Oak Fire Station, Luthersville City Hall, Rocky Mount Store, St. Marks Community Building, Warm Springs Police Department, Woodbury on Dromedary Street and Manchester City Hall.

No tires will be accepted at the container sites. All unmounted tires will only be accepted at the Meriwether County Public Works Department at 689 County Farm Road, Greenville from only Meriwether County residents.

The volunteers at the container site will assist with the placement of items and also record how many bags of trash or other items are brought to the site.

Also, no bags of trash can be left along the side of the roads that are being cleaned. They must be taken to the container sites nearest them.  

Registration forms can be picked up at the Meriwether County Administration Building in Greenville for teams that want to participate. T-Shirts will be given to the new teams; however, if you received a t-shirt at the April event, KMB asks that you wear it again for this event. Each team will be suppwith bags for each team member along with gloves to wear.  At the end of the cleanup, we ask that each team return a Results form to Keep Meriwether Beautiful so that we can award prizes.  Supplies can be picked up at the KMB office at the county administration building during the week prior to the event from Oct. 17-21st.

"Safety is our #1 priority," said Fryer, "While we want you to help clean our county, we ask that you watch for traffic in the area you are cleaning. If children are part of your team, please keep them safe. We encourage you to wear closed toed shoes and appropriate clothing for the weather and area you are cleaning.

 
"If you see anything dangerous or hazardous while you are working, do not pick it up, but call 911."

At the April cleanup, there were 248 volunteers and more than 500 bags of trash were picked up.

"We hope to top this with the fall cleanup," said Fryer.

For more information on volunteering to work at one of the container sites or to obtain a registration form for your team, please contact Jane Fryer at 706/672-3467 or Velinda Walton at 706/672-3464.

 

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UGA Extension Meriwether County ANR E-Newsletter
September 17, 2016

FALL ARMYWORMS
For those of you who read this the first time, my apologies. I had a request to reprint it so here is some of the same information that was in the August 19th issue.
Images: to the left are five of the six stages of development (instars) that fall armyworms go through before they pupate. To the right is a 6th instar larva (which can reach 1 ½ inches) on alfalfa found in a local field in August.
The last two instars, #5 and mostly #6, do 80% of the feeding damage. It takes 10-20 days usually for the larvae to develop into the 6th instar. If you are scouting your fields and pastures regularly (1-2 times a week) you should be finding the smaller larvae and making insecticide applications before any real damage occurs. Fall armyworms are still active in our area and could potentially remain active through October, so please continue scouting.
SCOUTING:
During sunny days the armyworms, on grass, will drop to the ground where it is shadier. They will also drop when the grass is disturbed. So you should be looking on the ground if scouting during the day. You may have to scrape away any grass mulch that is on the surface-they will hide under it. Most of their feeding will occur in the morning or late in the day so if you are scouting at that time you may actually find them on the grass. When I was in an infested alfalfa field around noon many of the armyworms were still in the canopy of the plants where there was plenty of shade. When I brushed the plants with my hands, though, the larvae dropped to the ground. You should be walking a zigzag pattern through your field (a w pattern works well) to cover the largest area. The rule for an insecticide application is “when the count exceeds 3 larvae ½ inch or larger per square foot”. Populations have been so high in number this year that if you find any at all you should treat.
************************
PEST OF THE WEEK
Powdery Mildew of Trees
Despite the drought in our county, powdery mildew has shown up on a number of trees species. This past week I was contacted about dogwoods and yellow or tulip poplars that were having problems. In the case of the tulip poplar, brown leaves covered in a white substance, were falling to the ground. The dogwoods still held their leaves on which a little bit of the powdery residue, which is actually fungal mycelium, was visible. Most of the leaves were showing a typical symptom of the disease which is a distortion and/or twisting of the leaves. 
Powdery mildews are like most fungal diseases in that they have both sexual and asexual stages. Since all powdery mildew species (and there are many) can germinate and cause infection in the absence of water, it’s not really surprising to find it infecting trees and other plants during a drought. Infection can occur with a relative humidity between 40-70% but can also happen below 25% when there is no air movement. One of the main recommendations for managing powdery mildews is to increase air circulation around plants. Spring and fall temperatures are ideal for the spread of spores and their infection.
Powdery mildews rarely kill their host plants but they can cause a reduction in photosynthesis. Since photosynthesis is how plants produce their food, a reduction can cause slower growth, greater water demands, early leaf drop, and a susceptibility to other pests and diseases. Some dogwood species and cultivars have some resistance to powdery mildew. If you are thinking of planting dogwoods be sure to look for varieties with resistance. In order to protect plants with a fungicide, applications must be made before the plants become infected. If you have dogwood trees that become infected yearly, you should look at thinning to create better air circulation and begin fungicide sprays as trees leaf out in the spring. Once daytime temperatures reach the mid-eighties to low-nineties, infection is less likely to occur so fungicides should no longer be needed. If infection occurs or is noticed in late summer there is no need to spray since the fungicides will not “cure” the problem. Raking up and destroying or bagging the fallen, infected leaves will help lower the level of inoculum for infection the next year.
Visit http://www.clemson.edu/…/pe…/plant_pests/trees/hgic2003.htmlfor a list of dogwoods that have powdery mildew resistance.

 

Included above are images that I took of a cleistotheca (minute fruiting body that can survive overwinter) releasing asci that contain the sexual ascospores of a powdery mildew infecting oak leaves. Anyone else remember Pac-Man? The really cool microscopic appendages that form on the cleistotheca are used to classify the fungi.

*********************

HOME GARDENING
Home Gardening, Food Production and Nutrition Seminar
Hosted by Harris County Extension and Chipley Coop
Monday, September 19th 9:30 AM-3:00 PM
Chipley Coop at 204 N. King Street Pine Mountain GA 31822
Topics covered include basics of planting a vegetable garden; variety selection; organic production; and food nutrition, preservation and safety.
Pre-registration is required by September 14th by calling the Harris County Extension office at 706-628-4824.
For more information please visit:
http://ugaextension.org/…/agriculture-and-natural-resources…
Fall Care for the Home Lawn
Meriwether County Extension Is Offering a Free Class on Lawn Care
Thursday evening, September 22nd 6:30-7:30 PM
Manchester Public Library at 218 Perry Street Manchester, GA 31816
Topics will include:
soil testing and liming
pre-emergent herbicides for annual weed prevention
perennial weed management
correct cultural practices
cool season turf versus warm season turf
To register please contact the Meriwether County Extension office at 706-672-4235 or uge2199@uga.edu
For more information please contact Susan James at 706-977-0882
**********************
POULTRY
Backyard Poultry Flock Management Program
Tuesday, October 4th from7:00-8:30 PM
Dr. Casey Ritz, UGA Poultry Science Department 
Basic Management, Breed Selection, and Disease Prevention
Tuesday, October 11th from7:00-8:30 PM
Dr. Brian Kiepper, UGA Poultry Science Department 
Meat Chicken Processing and Food Safety
Tuesday, October 18th from7:00-8:30 PM
Dr. Claudia Dunkley, UGA Poultry Science Department 
Bird Behavior, Housing and Management, Layer Production
Bogle Farms 
1785 Harman Road
Greenville, GA, 30222
Cost:
$20 for attending all 3 classes (includes all course materials and a certificate, if all classes are attended)
$10 per single session class (includes course material but no certificate)
Coffee, drinks and snacks will be available.
To register please contact the Meriwether County Extension office at 706-672-4235 or uge2199@uga.edu
Egg Candling Class
Friday, October 7th from 10:00 AM-3:00 PM
Georgia Department of Agriculture: Ben Pitts, Instructor
Manchester Public Library Meeting Room
218 Perry Street ~ Manchester, GA
If you plan to sell your eggs to individuals, or at a farmers market, an egg candling certificate from the Georgia Department of Agriculture is required.
The class will last about four hours, including one hour of classroom instruction, followed by a written examination and a hands-on candling examination.
There will be a one-hour lunch break on your own. The class is free and open to any interested Georgia resident.
To pre-register for the class and to get a copy of the required affidavit of lawful presence, please call the Meriwether County Extension office at 706-672-4235.
If you have any questions please contact Susan James at scj24262@uga.edu or Ben Pitts at Benjamin.Pitts@agr.georgia.gov
************************
LIVESTOCK and FORAGES
Calving Techniques Class
Presented by Dr. Lee Jones, UGA College of Veterinary Medicine
October 3rd starting at 6:30 PM
Lemmon Cattle Enterprises at 16810 Woodbury Hwy, Woodbury, GA 30293
Lee will be teaching simple calving-difficulty assistance techniques. He will also talk about lambing and kidding difficulties for those who are interested, so small ruminant folks should attend also! Coffee, drinks and snacks will be available. This class is free.
To pre-register please call our office at 706-672-4235 or for more information please contact Susan James at scj24262@uga.edu
*************************
BEEKEEPING WORKSHOP
Tuesday evening, September 20th 6:30-8:30 PM
Presented by Dr. Keith Delaplane
The workshop will focus on the major problems private and commercial beekeepers are facing today with large hive losses and what the best options are for improving our beekeeping success. Subjects covered include: varroa mites – progression and management; large numbers of winter and summer hive losses; best treatment options for pests and diseases; and keeping the honeybee industry alive and well for the future.
Cost is $15 which includes refreshments and reference material. Proceeds go toward establishing a local beekeepers association. To attend the workshop, please let us know by emailing Richard Littleton at rlittle@uga.edu or calling Carroll County Extension at 770-836-8546.

Carroll County Ag Center/Extension Office
900 Newnan Road
Carrollton, GA 30117
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GEORGIA CLEAN DAY-PESTICIDE WASTE COLLECTION EVENT
Georgia Department of Agriculture
Friday, September 30th 9:00 AM-3:00 PM
Cordele State Farmers Market at 1901 State Rt. 41 North Cordele, GA 31015
In order to participate in the program pre-registration is mandatory and must be completed by September 26th.
· ALL PESTICIDES BROUGHT TO THE COLLECTION SITE MUST BE LISTED ON THE PRE-REGISTRATION FORM.
· ITEMS NOT REGISTERED WILL BE REFUSED AT THE COLLECTION SITE.
· EMPTY CONTAINERS OR RINSATES WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.
· NO COMPRESSED GASES CAN BE ACCEPTED. (METHYL BROMIDE,
CHLORPICRIN, VIKANE, ETC.).
PROGRAM COLLECTION
Participants will deliver their waste pesticides to the collection site where the disposal contractor will unload them. There are no forms to sign-you do not have to exit your vehicle. The contractor will accept sole responsibility for the waste and will provide handling, packaging, and disposal of the waste pesticides at the collection site.
Please contact me for pre-registration forms and pesticide transport tips at 706-977-0882 or scj24262@uga.edu
***********************
OTHER COMMUNITY EVENTS
2016 Meriwether County Teen Maze
Volunteers Needed
Friday, September 23 8:00 AM-2:00 PM
At the old Greenville Middle School auditorium
TEEN MAZE is an organization that promotes awareness about various issues and problems facing adolescents within the community. Ninth graders will navigate through a life-size maze that offers real life choices in order to discover the consequences of their behaviors. Along the path, professionals in their field of expertise present information to students. The TEEN MAZE is designed to allow young people the opportunity to explore lifelike situations and their consequences without real-life permanency.
Teens will be given a scenario and then experience the consequences of the fate dealt to them, whether it is pregnancy, STD from unprotected sex, texting while driving, sexting or death from driving under the influence of alcohol. Our goal is for youth to understand their choices regarding sex, alcohol, tobacco, and drugs.
If you are interested in volunteering, please contact:
Lisa Parker at 706-672-1118 or lparker@pathwayscsb.org for the necessary forms or you can contact me (scj24262@uga.edu) and I will email them to you.
Racing for Roosevelt 5K “FUND RUN”
Roosevelt Warm Springs Georgia Hall
Saturday, September 24th Registration starts at 8:00 AM Race begins at 9:00 AM
All proceeds benefit the Roosevelt Warm Springs vocational rehabilitation programs.
Entry fees: Early registration is $20 with shirt and $10 without. Late registration is $25 with shirt and $15 without.
For registration and more information please contact Erin Young at 706-655-5666

International Professional Rodeo Association
Southeast Region Finals Rodeo at Quercus Farms
October 14th and 15th 8:00 PM
Flat Shoals Road, Gay Georgia 30218
The rodeo benefits veterans through RACE FOR THE WOUNDED: http://raceforthewounded.com/
Tickets go on sale Oct 1st
Tickets are $12; 6 and under free
Get advanced tickets at Shady Days in Gay Arts and Craft Festival on Oct 1st & 2nd for only $10
Come ride a horse before the show. Bring the kids to have their face painted. Lots of food and fun so don't miss out. Gates open at 6 and the action (bareback and saddle bronc riding, barrel racing, bull riding, roping and steer wrestling) starts at 8. Free parking
For more information contact:
Susan Pritchett, SRFR Representative, at 678-603-0038 or susan@srfrodeo.com or visit: http://www.srfrodeo.com/
Great American Clean-Up in Meriwether County
Volunteers Needed
Saturday, October 22nd 8:00 AM-4:00 PM
It’s time to start signing up again! Help Keep Meriwether Beautiful by cleaning up trash around your home or business on this day.
We have sign-up forms on our table outside our office or you can contact me at scj24262@uga.edu and I will email them to you.
************************
Gail Coffee asked me to post a request for information concerning Valentine “V”, a horse stolen in Alabama.
Please visit the link below or go to https://netposse.com/default.asp for Stolen Horse International for details.

NetPosse ALERTTM NR005045


Have a great weekend!
Susan
Susan C James
Agriculture and Natural Resources Agent
UGA Extension-Meriwether County
706-672-4235 Office

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Hiring event Sept. 22 for Mando

Mando is hiring. Those interested may attend a hiring event scheduled for next Thursday, Sept. 22, from 1-4 p.m. at the WGT Callaway Center in LaGrange. For details see these accompanying flyer.

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Flags ordered lowered to half-staff

Gov. Deal has ordered flags on all state buildings and grounds ordered to half-staff.

Here is the executive order: 

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Sign up Keep Meriwether Beautiful's Oct. 22 Cleanup!

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UGA Extension Meriwether County ANR E-Newsletter
September 9, 2016

GEORGIA CLEAN DAY-PESTICIDE WASTE COLLECTION EVENT

Georgia Department of Agriculture
Friday, Sept. 30, 9:00 AM-3:00 PM
Cordele State Farmers Market at 1901 State Rt. 41 North Cordele, GA 31015
In order to participate in the program pre-registration is mandatory and must be completed by September 26th.
· ALL PESTICIDES BROUGHT TO THE COLLECTION SITE MUST BE LISTED ON THE PRE-REGISTRATION FORM.
· ITEMS NOT REGISTERED WILL BE REFUSED AT THE COLLECTION SITE.
· EMPTY CONTAINERS OR RINSATES WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.
· NO COMPRESSED GASES CAN BE ACCEPTED. (METHYL BROMIDE,
CHLORPICRIN, VIKANE, ETC.).
PROGRAM COLLECTION
Participants will deliver their waste pesticides to the collection site where the disposal contractor will unload them. There are no forms to sign-you do not have to exit your vehicle. The contractor will accept sole responsibility for the waste and will provide handling, packaging, and disposal of the waste pesticides at the collection site.
Please contact me for pre-registration forms and pesticide transport tips at 706-977-0882 or scj24262@uga.edu
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PESTS OF THE WEEK
Fall armyworms are still active in the area! So you should be vigilant about scouting your pastures and making timely insecticide applications. You can use the IGRs (insect growth regulators) diflubenzuron (Dimilin 2L) or methoxyfenozide (Intrepid 2F) for small size larvae that are still molting. Use other recommended products for late instar larvae. All recommendations can be accessed at:
http://www.ent.uga.edu/…/GA-Pest-Management-2016-Commercial…
Armadillos are everywhere in Meriwether County. There are few management practices that are recommended for armadillos. They include trapping and shooting (be sure to check local regulations on discharging firearms). Since armadillos feed on soil inhabiting fauna such as grubs, recommendations used to include treating the soil to get rid of the grubs. That recommendation no longer applies since the armadillos are just as likely to be feeding on the good guys like earthworms and other soil inhabiting beneficials. What may be more helpful is eliminating overwintering habitats. Armadillos are susceptible to freezing temperatures and will die if exposed to them for extended periods. Be sure that they can’t get under your home or other structures where temperatures will remain above freezing. My guess is that many armadillos in this area survived this past winter due to the mild temperatures. They were probably able to survive in burrows in the natural landscape as well as under structures.
Last winter there were 34 days between November 25th and March 23rd that fell to 32°F or below. There were only three periods where the freezing temperatures lasted 4-5 days (data from the UGA weather station in Williamson). For folks closer to Pine Mountain there were 41 days of freezing and below temperatures in the same time period and one stretch of 7 days of below freezing temperatures (data from the UGA weather station in Pine Mountain). It may be that armadillos are able to survive these shorter periods of cold especially if the ground is not frozen. On sunny days they can still get out and forage in the soil for food. One of their food sources is fire ants so armadillos are viewed as beneficial by some folks.
For a thorough overview of armadillo biology please visit:
https://ugaurbanag.com/armadillos/…
For a good image of the recommended trap please visit:
http://extension.missouri.edu/p/g9456
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SOIL PREPARATION FOR PLANTING
At the Wildlife Program last week there seemed to be some confusion concerning soil preparation for food plots. The information below can be applied to most planting situations.
The first thing that should be done is to have the soil tested. The UGA Agricultural & Environmental Services Laboratories (AESL) ROUTINE SOIL TEST gives results for pH, Phosphorus (P), Potassium (K), Calcium (Ca), Magnesium (Mg), Manganese (Mn), and Zinc (Zn) using the Mehlich I extract. There is also a MICRONUTRIENT & OTHER EXTRACTABLE ELEMENT TEST for soils but the best way to tell if there is a micronutrient deficiency in a crop is to submit plant tissue for analysis. 
Once you have your soil test results you are set to go.
Lime Application
The results will let you know if the pH needs to be adjusted (usually upwards) and what to apply and how much to apply to make the adjustment. Raising the pH is a task that should be started 1-6 months prior to the planting date. Soil temperature and moisture will have a large impact on the ability of a material to change the pH. In general the warmer the temperature the faster a change will occur. In cooler weather it happens much slower. That is why we recommend soil testing in the fall for a spring garden or for establishing warm season turfgrass. If you make the lime application in the fall there will be time (4-6 months) for the pH to change. The opposite would be the case for establishing a cool season turfgrass, fall garden or summer wildlife food plot. Testing for those should be done in the spring or early summer. In this case the change will occur more quickly with the warmer temperatures but soil moisture (drought) might slow the process. You can soil test and apply lime on bare ground at any time of the year though.
Other factors that can impact raising the pH include the fineness of liming material and the degree of incorporation into the soil. Research has shown over and over that lime applied on soil surfaces generally only moves downward about two inches which means that the pH will only change within a two inch soil profile. Research in Brazil showed a vast improvement in lime mobility down to 4 inches with the addition of plant residues. Most plant roots will be in the soil profile from the surface down to 8 inches, though. So it is still best where possible to incorporate lime applications into the whole plow zone. Obviously this isn’t possible with perennial plantings or pastures but it can and should be done before their establishment to give the plants the best growing conditions to get started in. Future lime applications will be necessary as the pH drops over time. With annual crops, incorporation should always be done if possible. Below are the recommendations from the AESL SOIL TEST HANDBOOK FOR GEORGIA on how often to sample:
For most situations soils need to be tested every 2 to 3 years. However, test the soil when there is a suspected nutrient deficiency, once per crop rotation, or once every other year if the soil is fertilized and cropped intensively. Annual sampling is recommended (1) on areas where high-value cash crops such as tobacco and vegetables are grown, (2) on areas testing high in P and K where no phosphate or potash is recommended and none is applied, and (3) on areas where the annual nitrogen application rate exceeds 150 pounds of N per acre. Soil samples should also be taken following crops where large amounts of nutrients are removed in the harvested portion of the plant, particularly silage crops, hybrid Bermuda hay, and when peanut vines are used for hay.
If your land is sloped, which makes cultivation difficult, NRCS recommends using contour farming which is effective on slopes between 2 and 10 percent: http://www.nrcs.usda.gov/I…/FSE_DOCUMENTS/nrcs143_026017.pdf
Fertilizer Application
Typically all elements other than nitrogen can be applied preplant and incorporated into the soil. Nitrogen is often recommended to be applied in split applications. Depending on the crop, two or three split applications may be recommended. In commercial plasticulture production of vegetables and some fruits small amounts of nitrogen are applied daily through drip tape. If the nitrogen application should be split your soil test results will tell you that. Below is an example of the nitrogen recommendations from a soil test for cool season annual grasses grown in a deer food plot:
Small grains of rye, wheat, and oats: These crops can utilize about 100 pounds of nitrogen per acre during the growing season. Split the nitrogen application, applying 50 pounds per acre at planting and the other 50 pounds in late winter.
Ryegrass alone or small grain-ryegrass: Apply 50 pounds nitrogen per acre in the fall at planting, 50 pounds per acre in late winter, and 50 pounds per acre in early spring. Since ryegrass has a longer than normal grazing season, three applications of nitrogen for a total of 150 pounds instead of two for a total of 100 pounds will help extend the grazing period.
A couple of problems might occur if you apply all of the nitrogen at once instead of splitting the applications. Plants may not get the full benefit of the nitrogen application. Some of the nitrogen is likely to leach into groundwater before plants are large enough to utilize it, especially nitrate (NO₃⁻) forms of nitrogen. If using an ammonium (NH4+) form of nitrogen up to 30% may be lost to volatilization if the fertilizer is not incorporated or at least covered with soil. Liquid fertilizers were mentioned the other night. All fertilizers must in solution for plants to take them up, so liquid fertilizers can be very effective. Typically they are used for plasticulture production where fertilizers are injected through a drip tape. They are also frequently used in nursery production. Usually it is only high value crops like these that justify the use of liquid fertilizers since they are more expensive. Organic matter in composted manures and plant material will slowly contribute nitrogen to soils through a process called mineralization. This process occurs more slowly in colder weather which is actually a good thing for spring planting. If you apply compost in the fall nitrogen should be mineralized and available for plants by the spring. Anyone who uses compost or cover crops to increase organic matter knows how fast it breaks down during our hot and (usually) humid summers. So just like conventional fertilizers, compost must be applied regularly also.
If you have questions about liming or fertilization practices, you can read the AESL SOIL TEST HANDBOOK FOR GEORGIA at: http://aesl.ces.uga.edu/publications/soil/STHandbook.pdf or contact me at 706-977-0882 or scj24262@uga.edu
***********************
WEEKLY WATER AND CLIMATE UPDATE
If you’d like to get depressed by seeing how much rain we did not get from Hurricane Hermine you can visit: http://www.wcc.nrcs.usda.gov/…/s…/drought/dmrpt-20160908.pdf
***********************
HOME GARDENING
Home Gardening, Food Production and Nutrition Seminar
Hosted by Harris County Extension and Chipley Coop
Monday, September 19th 9:30 AM-3:00 PM
Chipley Coop at 204 N. King Street Pine Mountain GA 31822
Topics covered include basics of planting a vegetable garden; variety selection; organic production; and food nutrition, preservation and safety.
Pre-registration is required by September 14th by calling the Harris County Extension office at 706-628-4824.
For more information please visit:
http://ugaextension.org/…/agriculture-and-natural-resources…
Fall Care for the Home Lawn
Meriwether County Extension Is Offering a Free Class on Lawn Care
Thursday evening, September 22nd 6:30-7:30 PM
Manchester Public Library at 218 Perry Street Manchester, GA 31816
Topics will include:
soil testing and liming
pre-emergent herbicides for annual weed prevention
perennial weed management
correct cultural practices
cool season turf versus warm season turf
To register please contact the Meriwether County Extension office at 706-672-4235 or uge2199@uga.edu
For more information please contact Susan James at 706-977-0882
*************************
POULTRY
Backyard Poultry Flock Management Program
Tuesday, October 4th from7:00-8:30 PM
Dr. Casey Ritz, UGA Poultry Science Department 
Basic Management, Breed Selection, and Disease Prevention
Tuesday, October 11th from7:00-8:30 PM
Dr. Brian Kiepper, UGA Poultry Science Department 
Meat Chicken Processing and Food Safety
Tuesday, October 18th from7:00-8:30 PM
Dr. Claudia Dunkley, UGA Poultry Science Department 
Bird Behavior, Housing and Management, Layer Production
Description: Description: C:\Users\Susan\AppData\Local\Microsoft\Windows\Temporary Internet Files\Content.Word\1-Bogle Farm Logo.jpg
Bogle Farms 
1785 Harman Road
Greenville, GA, 30222
Cost:
$20 for attending all 3 classes (includes all course materials and a certificate, if all classes are attended)
$10 per single session class (includes course material but no certificate)
Coffee, drinks and snacks will be available.
To register please contact the Meriwether County Extension office at 706-672-4235 or uge2199@uga.edu
Egg Candling Class
Friday, Oct. 7 from 10:00 AM-3:00 PM
Georgia Department of Agriculture: Ben Pitts, Instructor
Manchester Public Library Meeting Room
218 Perry Street ~ Manchester, GA
If you plan to sell your eggs to individuals, or at a farmers market, an egg candling certificate from the Georgia Department of Agriculture is required.
The class will last about four hours, including one hour of classroom instruction, followed by a written examination and a hands-on candling examination.
There will be a one-hour lunch break on your own. The class is free and open to any interested Georgia resident.
To pre-register for the class and to get a copy of the required affidavit of lawful presence, please call the Meriwether County Extension office at 706-672-4235.
If you have any questions please contact Susan James at scj24262@uga.edu or Ben Pitts at Benjamin.Pitts@agr.georgia.gov
*************************
LIVESTOCK and FORAGES
Meriwether County Cattlemen’s Association Monthly Meeting
Tuesday, September 13th 7:30 PM
New location: Blackbird Café in Woodbury 18118 Main Street
The program includes Cathy Rice of the L & K Farmers Livestock Market; Robert Allen, Vice-chairman of the Farm Service Agency County Committee (including Meriwether); Kaytlyn Malia, Director of Industry Information and Public Relations for the Georgia Beef Board; and Michele Creamer, Vice President of Operations for the Georgia Cattlemen's Association and Georgia Beef Board.
Calving Techniques Class
Presented by Dr. Lee Jones, UGA College of Veterinary Medicine
October 3rd starting at 6:30 PM
Lemmon Cattle Enterprises at 16810 Woodbury Hwy, Woodbury, GA 30293
Lee will be teaching simple calving-difficulty assistance techniques. He will also talk about lambing and kidding difficulties for those who are interested, so small ruminant folks should attend also! Coffee, drinks and snacks will be available. This class is free.
To pre-register please call our office at 706-672-4235 or for more information please contact Susan James at scj24262@uga.edu
****************************
BEEKEEPING WORKSHOP
Tuesday evening, September 20th 6:30-8:30 PM
Presented by Dr. Keith Delaplane
The workshop will focus on the major problems private and commercial beekeepers are facing today with large hive losses and what the best options are for improving our beekeeping success. Subjects covered include: varroa mites – progression and management; large numbers of winter and summer hive losses; best treatment options for pests and diseases; and keeping the honeybee industry alive and well for the future.
Cost is $15 which includes refreshments and reference material. Proceeds go toward establishing a local beekeepers association. To attend the workshop, please let us know by emailing Richard Littleton at rlittle@uga.edu or calling Carroll County Extension at 770-836-8546.
Carroll County Ag Center/Extension Office
900 Newnan Road
Carrollton, GA 30117
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OTHER COMMUNITY EVENTS
The 3rd Annual First Responder Luncheon
Sunday, Sept. 11 from 12-3 PM
American Legion Post 186
Gay Road, Greenville, GA 30222
You can help by dropping off a dish or dessert or by being on hand to help serve the meal. Please contact Larry Dunaway for more information at lsdunaway@wirelesshometown.com
Covered Dish Supper for First Responders
The luncheon will be followed at 6 PM by a Covered Dish Supper for First Responders at Fellowship Community Church at 4871 Roosevelt Highway in Warm Springs. The Children’s Department of Manchester First Methodist will offer a ‘thank you’ by passing out snack bags to the First Responders. Contributions of side dishes and desserts are welcome.
2016 Meriwether County Teen Maze
Volunteers Needed
Friday, Sept. 23, 8:00 AM-2:00 PM
At the old Greenville Middle School auditorium
TEEN MAZE is an organization that promotes awareness about various issues and problems facing adolescents within the community. Ninth graders will navigate through a life-size maze that offers real life choices in order to discover the consequences of their behaviors. Along the path, professionals in their field of expertise present information to students. The TEEN MAZE is designed to allow young people the opportunity to explore lifelike situations and their consequences without real-life permanency.
Teens will be given a scenario and then experience the consequences of the fate dealt to them, whether it is pregnancy, STD from unprotected sex, texting while driving, sexting or death from driving under the influence of alcohol. Our goal is for youth to understand their choices regarding sex, alcohol, tobacco, and drugs.
If you are interested in volunteering, please contact:
Lisa Parker at 706-672-1118 or lparker@pathwayscsb.org for the necessary forms or you can contact me (scj24262@uga.edu) and I will email them to you.
Racing for Roosevelt 5K “FUND RUN”
Roosevelt Warm Springs Georgia Hall
Saturday, Sept. 24. Registration starts at 8:00 AM Race begins at 9:00 AM
All proceeds benefit the Roosevelt Warm Springs vocational rehabilitation programs.
Entry fees: Early registration is $20 with shirt and $10 without. Late registration is $25 with shirt and $15 without.
For registration and more information please contact Erin Young at 706-655-5666
International Professional Rodeo Association
Southeast Region Finals Rodeo at Quercus Farms
Oct. 14 and 15 at 8:00 PM
Flat Shoals Road, Gay Georgia 30218
The rodeo benefits veterans through RACE FOR THE WOUNDED: http://raceforthewounded.com/
Tickets go on sale Oct 1st
Tickets are $12; 6 and under free
Get advanced tickets at Shady Days in Gay Arts and Craft Festival on Oct. 1 & 2 for only $10
Come ride a horse before the show. Bring the kids to have their face painted. Lots of food and fun so don't miss out. Gates open at 6 and the action (bareback and saddle bronc riding, barrel racing, bull riding, roping and steer wrestling) starts at 8. Free parking
For more information contact:
Susan Pritchett, SRFR Representative, at 678-603-0038 or susan@srfrodeo.com or visit: http://www.srfrodeo.com/
Great American Clean-Up in Meriwether County
Volunteers Needed
Saturday, October 22nd 8:00 AM-4:00 PM
It’s time to start signing up again! Help Keep Meriwether Beautiful by cleaning up trash around your home or business on this day.
We have sign-up forms on our table outside our office or you can contact me at scj24262@uga.edu and I will email them to you.
*************************
Have a great weekend!
Susan
Susan C James
Agriculture and Natural Resources Agent
UGA Extension-Meriwether County
706-672-4235 Office

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The Real Woodbury Zombie GeoQuest

is launched at Lake Meriwether

The "Real Woodbury" in Meriwether County launched "The Real Woodbury Zombie Geo Quest" on Sunday afternoon, Sept. 4 at Lake Meriwether.

If you want to learn more about geocaching, log onto to 
https://www.geocaching.com/…/GC6PCJ9_real-woodbury-zombie-g…
The Real Woodbury GeoQuest.

For more information or questions, contact Meriwether County Chamber of Commerce & Tourism at 706-655-2558 or email meriwetherchamber@windstream.net
Or just go to geocaching.com and create a free account and search for the Woodbury geocaching opportunity.

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Area Labor Profile Issued

Here is the latest Labor Profile from the Georgia Department of Labor.

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All of Meriwether Commissioners receive certification

The last two of Meriwether's Commissioners, Commissioner Shirley Hines and Commissioner Rosla Plant were presented certificates for achieving the milestone of Certified County Commissioner at the BOC meeting Aug. 23.

This nine-course, 66-hour certification gives Meriwether's Commissioners the tools and knowledge needed to lead our county and be able to make decisions for the greater good in our great County. We are now fortunate to have all 5 of our Commissioners certified, Meriwether County is one of few counties in the State to have all presiding Commissioners certified. On hand to present the certificates were representatives from ACCG and the University of Georgia Carl Vinson Institute of Government. Mr. Mike Plant accepted on behalf of Commissioner Plant as she was home ill. Congratulations.

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UGA Extension Meriwether County ANR E-Newsletter 
August 26, 2016
PEST OF THE WEEK
Lantana Lace Bug (Teleonemia scrupulosa) 

Some of you may have noticed that the leaves on your lantana plants look pale, stippled or maybe even burned. You may think that the plants are drought stressed. What is much more likely is that they are suffering from the feeding damage of lantana lace bugs. 
You may remember that I wrote earlier this summer about azalea lace bugs. They both belong to the Tingidae, a family of insects that are usually very specific about what plant species that they will feed on. If it is a lace bug and you know the common name of the plant that they are feeding on you can easily figure out the common name of the insect. (There are reports of lantana lace bug feeding on Leucophyllum spp. as well as sesame plants). Lace bugs feed by piercing the plant tissues and sucking out the cell fluids. Their feeding typically occurs on the underside of the leaf where they hang out but the damage can be seen on the top of the leaf. They leave dark spots on excrement on the leaf underside which is also diagnostic of a lace bug infestation. 

You can see how lace bugs get their name by looking at the image of the winged adult below. The nymphs or immatures have spines on the dorsal portion of the abdomen. You can also see wing pads on the nymph in the image below. These pads will become wings in the adult. 
Insecticide control is the same as that for azalea lace bug. The systemics dinotefuran and imidacloprid are both effective. Research has also been done to determine what species and varieties of lantana have resistance to lace bugs.

 

Reinart, George, Mackay and Davis discovered that “Cultivars with gold, red, purple, and white flowers had far fewer lace bugs than did cultivars with either orange/red, yellow, or bi-colors of yellow with another color.” They also found that cultivars of Lantana montevidensis are highly resistant. You may know this lantana as weeping or trailing purple lantana. The yellow flowering variety of lantana that we have planted in the butterfly gardens in Warm Springs and Luthersville have definitely suffered from lace bug damage. The more common multi-colored forms that I have seen don’t seem to be suffering as much.
James A. Reinert, S. W. George, W. A. Mackay and T. D. Davis. Resistance among Lantana Cultivars to the Lantana Lace Bug, Teleonemia scrupulosa (Hemiptera: Tingidae) The Florida Entomologist
Vol. 89, No. 4 (Dec., 2006), pp. 449-454
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COOL MUSHROOMS IN THE LANDSCAPE
Dead Man’s Foot (Pisolithus tinctorius) 

Not all mushrooms are bad. In fact many, known as mycorrhizae, have a mutual symbiotic relationship with plants. The fungi help the plants access nutrients, especially phosphorous, and the plant provides sugars (carbs) for the fungi. Many of the mushrooms seen in the root zones of trees are mycorrhizal. The one pictured below, though not very attractive-hence the name, is considered beneficial to conifers and oaks. It is also known as the dye-maker’s false puffball because it has been used to dye wool. It needs to be used before the spores mature, though which is happening with this specimen. Dye-maker’s false puffball, along with true puffballs, is a member of the Gasteromycetes which means stomach mushroom. They differ from other fungi in that spores develop inside (hence stomach) the fruiting body, not on the outside. In the second image you can see where the mature spores are ready to disperse through the cracking and breakdown of the periderm.
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PROGRAMS
WILDLIFE
Wildlife Program
For Harris, Meriwether, Muscogee and Troup Counties
PLANTING FOOD PLOTS FOR DEER: THE HOW, WHERE, WHY AND WHEN
Presented by Dr. Mark McConnell, UGA Wildlife Outreach Specialist
Thursday, September 1st 6:30-8:00 PM
At Oakhurst Farm 19888 HWY 219 West Point, GA
This program is free. 
Coffee, drinks and snacks will be available.
To pre-register please contact Angie Ledford at 706-672-4235, 
For more information contact Susan at scj24262@uga.edu
******************
HOME GARDENING
Home Gardening, Food Production and Nutrition Seminar
Hosted by Harris County Extension and Chipley Coop
Monday, September 19th 9:30 AM-3:00 PM
Chipley Coop at 204 N. King Street Pine Mountain GA 31822
Topics covered include basics of planting a vegetable garden; variety selection; organic production; and food nutrition, preservation and safety.
Pre-registration is required by September 14th by calling the Harris County Extension office at 706-628-4824.
For more information please visit:
http://ugaextension.org/…/agriculture-and-natural-resources…
Fall Care for the Home Lawn
Meriwether County Extension Is Offering a Free Class on Lawn Care Thursday Evening, September 22nd 6:30-7:30 PM
Manchester Public Library at 218 Perry Street Manchester, GA 31816
Topics will include:
• soil testing and liming
• pre-emergent herbicides for annual weed prevention
• perennial weed management 
• correct cultural practices 
• cool season turf versus warm season turf
To register please contact the Meriwether County Extension office at 706-672-4235 or uge2199@uga.edu
For more information please contact Susan James at 706-977-0882
****************
POULTRY
Backyard Poultry Flock Management Program
Tuesday, October 4th from 7:00-8:30 PM 
Dr. Casey Ritz, UGA Poultry Science Department 
Basic Management, Breed Selection, and Disease Prevention
Tuesday, October 11th from 7:00-8:30 PM
Dr. Brian Kiepper, UGA Poultry Science Department 
Meat Chicken Processing and Food Safety
Tuesday, October 18th from 7:00-8:30 PM
Dr. Claudia Dunkley, UGA Poultry Science Department 
Bird Behavior, Housing and Management, Layer Production
Bogle Farms
1785 Harman Road
Greenville, GA, 30222
Cost:
$20 for attending all 3 classes (includes all course materials and a certificate, if all classes are attended)
$10 per single session class (includes course material but no certificate)
Coffee, drinks and snacks will be available.
To register please contact the Meriwether County Extension office at 
706-672-4235 or uge2199@uga.edu
Egg Candling Class
Friday, October 7th from 10:00 AM-3:00 PM
Georgia Department of Agriculture: Ben Pitts, Instructor
Manchester Public Library Meeting Room
218 Perry Street ~ Manchester, GA
If you plan to sell your eggs to individuals, or at a farmers market, an egg candling certificate from the Georgia Department of Agriculture is required.
The class will last about four hours, including one hour of classroom instruction, followed by a written examination and a hands-on candling examination.
There will be a one-hour lunch break on your own. The class is free and open to any interested Georgia resident.
To pre-register for the class and to get a copy of the required affidavit of lawful presence, please call the Meriwether County Extension office at 706-672-4235. 
If you have any questions please contact Susan James at scj24262@uga.edu or Ben Pitts at Benjamin.Pitts@agr.georgia.gov
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LIVESTOCK and FORAGES
HERD Field Day
Wednesday, August 31st, 9 AM-4 PM
UGA Alapaha Beef Unit 
20038 HWY 129, Alapaha, 31622
Join UGA Extension for an educational Field Day enhancing practical knowledge and discovering more of what the Georgia Heifer Evaluation and Reproductive Development Programs are all about! Registration with coffee and donuts begins at 8 AM. 
Registration includes all materials, seminars, BQA Certification, and lunch. The program will include:
• BQA Training: Parts 1& 2
• Heifer Development Strategies for Optimal Reproduction
• Consumer Perceptions and Education
• BQA Demo: Low Stress Handling and Proper Vaccine Administration
• A. l. Synchronization and Protocol Introduction
• H.E.R.D. Program: Grading and Disposition Scoring
Cost: $15.00 if postmarked by August 8th; then $25.00. 
For more information or to register please visit: http://blog.extension.uga.edu/beef/
Calving Techniques Class 
Presented by Dr. Lee Jones, UGA College of Veterinary Medicine
October 3rd starting at 6:30 PM
Lemmon Cattle Enterprises at 16810 Woodbury Hwy, Woodbury, GA 30293
Lee will be teaching simple calving-difficulty assistance techniques. He will also talk about lambing and kidding difficulties for those who are interested, so small ruminant folks should attend also! Coffee, drinks and snacks will be available. This class is free. 
To pre-register please call our office at 706-672-4235 or for more information please contact Susan James at scj24262@uga.edu
**************
Georgia DNR Wildlife Resources 
For the first time in five years, Georgia Public Fishing Areas (PFAs) are scheduled to be open every Monday and Tuesday, beginning Labor Day Monday, September 5th. This means that they will be open 7 days a week for your fishing fun! The closest PFAs to Meriwether County are Big Lazer Creek PFA in Talbot County and Marben Farms PFA in Jasper/Newton counties. For more information please visit:
http://georgiawildlife.com/node/4243
http://www.georgiawildlife.org/PFA/BigLazer
http://www.georgiawildlife.org/PFA/CharlieElliott
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OTHER COMMUNITY EVENTS
2nd Annual Roosevelt Warm Springs Development Fund Benefit
Clay Shooting Tournament-All Ages Event
Saturday, August 27 10:00 AM-1:00 PM
Big Red Oak Plantation Gay, GA
bigredoakplantation.com
Advanced registration is required 
Cost: $100 Individual and $375 Team of four
To register or for more information contact Erin Young at 706-655-5666
The 3rd Annual First Responder Luncheon
Sunday, September 11th 12-3 PM
American Legion Post 186
Gay Road, Greenville, GA 30222
You can help by dropping off a dish or dessert or by being on hand to help serve the meal. Please contact Larry Dunaway for more information at lsdunaway@wirelesshometown.com
2016 Meriwether County Teen Maze
Volunteers Needed
Friday, September 23 8:00 AM-2:00 PM
At the old Greenville Middle School auditorium
TEEN MAZE is an organization that promotes awareness about various issues and problems facing adolescents within the community. Ninth graders will navigate through a life-size maze that offers real life choices in order to discover the consequences of their behaviors. Along the path, professionals in their field of expertise present information to students. The TEEN MAZE is designed to allow young people the opportunity to explore lifelike situations and their consequences without real-life permanency.
Teens will be given a scenario and then experience the consequences of the fate dealt to them, whether it is pregnancy, STD from unprotected sex, texting while driving, sexting or death from driving under the influence of alcohol. Our goal is for youth to understand their choices regarding sex, alcohol, tobacco, and drugs.
If you are interested in volunteering, please contact:
Lisa Parker at 706-672-1118 or lparker@pathwayscsb.org for the necessary forms or you can contact me (scj24262@uga.edu) and I will email them to you.
International Professional Rodeo Association
Southeast Region Finals Rodeo at Quercus Farms
October 14th and 15th 8:00 PM
Flat Shoals Road, Gay Georgia 30218
The rodeo benefits veterans through RACE FOR THE WOUNDED: http://raceforthewounded.com/
Tickets go on sale Oct 1st 
Tickets are $12; 6 and under free
Get advanced tickets at Shady Days in Gay Arts and Craft Festival on Oct 1st & 2nd for only $10
Come ride a horse before the show. Bring the kids to have their face painted. Lots of food and fun so don't miss out. Gates open at 6 and the action (bareback and saddle bronc riding, barrel racing, bull riding, roping and steer wrestling) starts at 8. Free parking
For more information contact:
Susan Pritchett, SRFR Representative, at 678-603-0038 or susan@srfrodeo.com or visit: http://www.srfrodeo.com/
Great American Clean-Up in Meriwether County
Volunteers Needed
Saturday, October 22nd 8:00 AM-4:00 PM
It’s time to start signing up again! Help Keep Meriwether Beautiful by cleaning up trash around your home or business on this day. 
We have sign-up forms on our table outside our office or you can contact me (scj24262@uga.edu) and I will email them to you.
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Have a great weekend!
Susan C James
Agriculture and Natural Resources Agent
UGA Extension-Meriwether County
706-672-4235 Office

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Notice of Meeting To Set Tax Millage

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Dongwon AutoPart Technology, LLC to

add equipment at Meriwether facility

The Meriwether County Industrial Development Authority has approved the issuance of a Meriwether County Industrial Development Authority Taxable Industrial Development Revenue Bond in an amount of $13,000,000 to pay or reimburse the costs of acquiring and installing additional equipment to be used in their facility in Meriwether Industrial Park.
Dongwon AutoPart Technology, LLC, located at 475 Meriwether Park Drive was the first company to locate in Meriwether Park in 2008 At that time, the Authority issued industrial revenue bonds in the amount of $30,000,000. With the new bond issue, this brings a total investment from Dongwon to Meriwether County of $43,000,000.
The company employs 300 and they produce door frames for Kia Motors Manufacturing Georgia. Dongwon also operates a plant in Luverne, Al that supplies parts to Hyundai Manufacturing in Montgomery, Al.
Mr. Charlie Kim, President of Dongwon AutoPart Technology, LLC and Mr. Han Ki (Billy) Kim, Accounting and Finance Manager were directly involved in the expansion of the investment. “Mr. Charlie Kim stated that they were delighted and pleased with the process of our expansion of equipment and technology in Meriwether County. We look forward to future expansions at this facility.”
Robert Moreland, Chairman of the Meriwether County Industrial Development Authority stated the following: “The Meriwether County Industrial Development Authority is very excited to assist with the additional investment of one of our major companies in Meriwether County. Dongwon AutoPart Technology is one of our great assets in providing jobs and employment in our county. We look forward to the future growth of this facility”.
For more information on Dongwon AutoPart Technology, LLC, Contact:
Jane Fryer, President
Meriwether County Industrial Development Authority
706/672-3467; J.Fryer@MeriwetherCountyGa.Gov

Dongwon Building in Meriwether Industrial Park

Dongwon officials and Meriwether Industrial Development Authority members:First row: Penny Jones, HR Manager, Dongwon, Charlie Kim, President of Dongwon, Jane Fryer, President MCIDA, Billy Kim, Accounting and Finance Director Dongwon. Second Row: Robert Moreland, Chairman, MCIDA, Velinda Walton, Executive Assistant, MCIDA, Bruce O’Neal, Board Member of MCIDA, Herman Ward, Board Member of MCIDA, Bill Gregory, Finance Director for Meriwether County and Mike Johnson, Board Member of MCIDA.

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List of Meriwether County roads being resurfaced

A list of Meriwether County roads are being re-surfaced by Piedmont Paving, Inc. under an agreement with the Meriwether Board of Commissioners.

Here is the full list: 

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'The Real Woodbury Zombie Geo Quest'

launches Sept. 4 at Lake Meriwether

The "Real Woodbury" in Meriwether County launches "The Real Woodbury Zombie Geo Quest" on Sunday, Sept. 4 at Lake Meriwether. The address is 728 Lake Meriwether Drive, Woodbury, GA and the launch event will be from 11 a.m. until 2 p.m. If you are interested in attending the event or you want to learn more about geocaching, log onto to 

https://www.geocaching.com/…/GC6PCJ9_real-woodbury-zombie-g…
The Real Woodbury GeoQuest.

For more information or questions, contact Meriwether County Chamber of Commerce & Tourism at 706-655-2558 or email meriwetherchamber@windstream.net
Or just go to geocaching.com and create a free account and search for the Woodbury event.

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UGA Extension Meriwether County ANR E-Newsletter
August 19, 2016

INVASION OF THE FALL ARMYWORM
If you haven’t had a problem with fall armyworms (Spodoptera frugiperda) this summer, you probably know someone who has. There are over sixty different plant species that they are known to feed on but they have mostly been found here in Bermudagrass pastures. I got the first notice this week of them feeding in an alfalfa field. My first encounter, years ago, with fall armyworms was in a neighbor’s Bermudagrass lawn. So beware: urban folks are not immune to the damage that they can cause. (Since I wrote the last two sentences I got my first notice of fall armyworms in a Bermudagrass lawn here in Meriwether County. It was seeded about a month ago, so this is basically its very first growth being eaten.) Since the armyworms have been so prevalent and damaging this year, I’ve had a request to write about their life cycle and biology. The life cycle is pretty straight forward; the biology is a little more complex.
Adult moths migrate into our area and at night mate near the plants on which the females will lay eggs. Eggs are laid in masses of fifty to over a hundred. The female only mates once a night but will mate for consecutive nights so potentially there will be groups of larvae at different ages in a field from eggs laid on multiple evenings. Larvae will hatch out in 2-4 days and proceed to feed and develop through 6 instars (stages of growth during which they molt or lose their old exoskeleton and develop a new one). The first three to four instars feed but don’t do much damage. It is the last two instars (mostly the 6th) that do 80% of the feeding damage and that will cause a farmer to say to me “It happened overnight!” So in some ways they are correct-most of the damage may have happened overnight-but the armyworms will have been there for at least 10-20 days.

The 6th instar, after about 4 days of feeding, will drop and tunnel into the ground 1-3 inches deep to pupate. The pupal stage lasts about 7-9 days after which the adult emerges and the cycle starts all over again. In our area, during the summer, the life cycle is supposed to take around 30 days. I looked back to see when I sent out the first alert for fall armyworms found in fields near Pine Mountain. The date was July 14th. This most recent alarm began this past weekend which would make it right at 30 days between the two populations.
What should you take from all of the above information? Basically, that you have plenty of time from when the larvae first make an appearance in your fields to manage them before they do lots of damage. As soon as a first alert goes out you should be scouting your pastures and fields at least twice a week for possibly a couple of months.

If you are scouting correctly and doing it regularly you will be able to begin a management practice (spray or cut for hay) while the larvae are small. Remember they will not do much damage until they have reached a length of 1-1 ½ inches. And there may be multiple generations so don’t stop scouting until you are certain that they are no longer reproducing in the area.
SCOUTING:
During sunny days the larvae, on grass, will drop to the ground where it is shadier. They will also drop when the grass is disturbed. So you should be looking on the ground if scouting during the day. You may have to scrape away any grass mulch that is on the surface-they will hide under it. Most of their feeding will occur in the morning or late in the day so if you are scouting at that time you may actually find them on the grass. I went and looked at the alfalfa field this week that had armyworms (see images below). I was out there around noon but because there is more leaf coverage on alfalfa many of the armyworms were still in the canopy of the plants where there was plenty of shade. When I brushed the plants with my hands, though, the larvae would then drop to the ground. You should be walking a zigzag pattern through your field (a w pattern works well) to cover the largest area. I scouted this way in another field of Bermuda this past week and stopped to look at about 20 spots. There were only 2 “hotspots” where the number of larvae actually justified spraying-the rule for an insecticide application is “when the count exceeds 3 larvae ½ inch or larger per square foot”. In such a case as above, the farmer could decide to spray just in those “hotspots” as opposed to the whole field. You would probably want to be fairly certain that you had found all of the hotspots though. If you find yourself in the situation where you didn’t scout and all of the armyworms were large, you might decide to go ahead and cut the field because it is probably too late for the insecticides to be helpful. Cutting is also an option if you find small larvae but it is almost time to cut anyway. In both cases you avoid spraying which can be costly.
In the image on the left you may be able to see the inverted “y” on the head of the larvae that is diagnostic for fall armyworms. In the image in the middle you can see fall armyworm webbing to the right and feeding damage on a leave to the left. In the image on the right you can see the stages of development. The last (6th) instar is missing. Younger larvae will not eat the whole leaf; they will create “windowpanes” by feeding through small areas or eat just a portion of the leaf surface, as seen below. Seeing this damage can let you know that fall armyworms have arrived. You still need to scout for the actual larvae, though, so you will know what stage of development that they are at. You may have a mix of sizes.
With regards to their complex biology, I will mention a few things. Research has shown that there are two probable paths of migration for fall armyworms to move into areas of the United States where they cannot overwinter. Genetic testing done in the 1980’s and 1990’s showed that there were two distinct populations of migratory fall armyworm adults-one that moved in from south Texas and Mexico and one that moved up from south Florida. But research has also suggested that some late summer/fall infestations of fall armyworms are actually moths on a reverse migration-they are heading back south. Even more recent research suggests that the genetic separation based on geography is not as well marked as it once was. What has remained the same, though, is that there are two genetically distinct strains of fall armyworms based on food preferences. There is a strain that prefers large-seeded grasses like corn and sorghum and another that prefers small-seeded grasses like rice and Bermudagrass. So far these strains have been shown to be incapable of successfully cross breeding. Eventually we may learn enough about their complex biology to be better able to manage them. If you would like even more information about fall armyworms, just let me know.
Pesticide recommendations for pastures can be found here:
http://www.ent.uga.edu/…/GA-Pest-Management-2016-Commercial…
Pesticide recommendations for lawns can be found here:
http://www.ent.uga.edu/…/GA-Pest-Management-2016-Home-TURF.…
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If You Think We Have It Bad….
Whenever I start feeling sorry for myself I make myself remember that there is always someone with worst problems. If you follow the link below you will be able to see how bad it has been for the folks in Louisiana. After watching the videos on the USDA Water and Climate Update for August 18th I guarantee that our drought won’t look so bad to you anymore.
http://www.wcc.nrcs.usda.gov/…/s…/drought/dmrpt-20160818.pdf
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FRUIT GROWERS
I forgot last week to mention the MyIPM app. It’s the next best thing to your county agent. The MyIPM series smartphone applications were developed by Clemson University in collaboration with Cornell University, University of Massachusetts, Pennsylvania State University, North Carolina State University and the University of Georgia. The apps are available for free in the Apple Store and Google Play Store to promote Integrated Pest Management for sustained, commercial fruit crop production. There currently are two disease apps and one pest app available. The disease apps are MyIPM-SED (peaches, strawberries, and blueberries) and MyIPM-NED (apples, pears, cherries, and cranberries). The pest app is MyIPM-SEP. SED stands for Southeastern US Diseases, NED stands for Northeastern US Diseases, and SEP stands for Southeastern US Pests. It includes the following features:
· Diagnostics, including description and pictures of fruit crop diseases, pests, and disorders.
· Name and description of the causal agents, including a 2-min audio from the regional specialist
· Chemical and biological control tactics
· Registered conventional and biological active ingredients for each disease/pest, sortable by FRAC codes, efficacy, and EIQ value
· Registered conventional and biological products (trade names), rate per acre, PHI, REI
· Audio recordings from regional specialists
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PROGRAMS
WILDLIFE
Wildlife Program
For Harris, Meriwether, Muscogee and Troup Counties
PLANTING FOOD PLOTS FOR DEER: THE HOW, WHERE, WHY AND WHEN
Presented by Dr. Mark McConnell, UGA Wildlife Outreach Specialist
Thursday, September 1st 6:30-8:00 PM
At Oakhurst Farm 19888 HWY 219 West Point, GA
This program is free.
Coffee, drinks and snacks will be available.
To pre-register please contact Angie Ledford at 706-672-4235,
For more information contact Susan at scj24262@uga.edu
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POULTRY
Backyard Poultry Flock Management Program
Tuesday, October 4th from7:00-8:30 PM
Dr. Casey Ritz, UGA Poultry Science Department 
Basic Management, Breed Selection, and Disease Prevention
Tuesday, October 11th from7:00-8:30 PM
Dr. Brian Kiepper, UGA Poultry Science Department 
Meat Chicken Processing and Food Safety
Tuesday, October 18th from7:00-8:30 PM
Dr. Claudia Dunkley, UGA Poultry Science Department 
Bird Behavior, Housing and Management, Layer Production
Bogle Farms
1785 Harman Road
Greenville, GA, 30222
Cost:
$20 for attending all 3 classes (includes all course materials and a certificate, if all classes are attended)
$10 per single session class (includes course material but no certificate)
Coffee, drinks and snacks will be available.
Egg Candling Class
Friday, October 7th from 10:00 AM-3:00 PM
Georgia Department of Agriculture: Ben Pitts, Instructor
Manchester Public Library Meeting Room
218 Perry Street ~ Manchester, GA
If you plan to sell your eggs to individuals, or at a farmers market, an egg candling certificate from the Georgia Department of Agriculture is required.
The class will last about four hours, including one hour of classroom instruction, followed by a written examination and a hands-on candling examination.
There will be a one-hour lunch break on your own. The class is free and open to any interested Georgia resident.
To pre-register for the class and to get a copy of the required affidavit of lawful presence, please call the Meriwether County Extension office at 706-672-4235.
If you have any questions please contact Susan James at scj24262@uga.edu or Ben Pitts at Benjamin.Pitts@agr.georgia.gov
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LIVESTOCK and FORAGES
HERD Field Day
Wednesday, August 31st, 9 AM-4 PM
UGA Alapaha Beef Unit
20038 HWY 129, Alapaha, 31622
Join UGA Extension for an educational Field Day enhancing practical knowledge and discovering more of what the Georgia Heifer Evaluation and Reproductive Development Programs are all about! Registration with coffee and donuts begins at 8 AM.
Registration includes all materials, seminars, BQA Certification, and lunch. The program will include:
· BQA Training: Parts 1& 2
· Heifer Development Strategies for Optimal Reproduction
· Consumer Perceptions and Education
· BQA Demo: Low Stress Handling and Proper Vaccine Administration
· A. l. Synchronization and Protocol Introduction
· H.E.R.D. Program: Grading and Disposition Scoring
Cost: $15.00 if postmarked by August 8th; then $25.00.
For more information or to register please visit: http://blog.extension.uga.edu/beef/
Calving Techniques Class
Presented by Dr. Lee Jones, UGA College of Veterinary Medicine
October 3rd starting at 6:30 PM
Lemmon Cattle Enterprises at 16810 Woodbury Hwy, Woodbury, GA 30293
Lee will be teaching simple calving-difficulty assistance techniques. He will also talk about lambing and kidding difficulties for those who are interested, so small ruminant folks should attend also! Coffee, drinks and snacks will be available. This class is free.
To pre-register please call our office at 706-672-4235 or for more information please contact Susan James at scj24262@uga.edu
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OTHER COMMUNITY EVENTS

Alcohol Prevention Project in Manchester
Thursday, August 25, 2016 5:30-8:30 PM
Manchester Community Building
105 2nd Avenue, Manchester GA
There will be a group discussion on substance abuse prevention for youth who display at risk behaviors and also give parents and guardians the tools to combat these behaviors.
All interested parties are welcome but especially educators, mental health providers, counselors, caregivers, parents and guardians, law enforcement, government officials and youth.
Registration begins at 5:00 PM. There will be door prizes and food.
2nd Annual Roosevelt Warm Springs Development Fund Benefit
Clay Shooting Tournament-All Ages Event
Saturday, August 27 10:00 AM-1:00 PM
Big Red Oak Plantation Gay, GA
bigredoakplantation.com
Advanced registration is required
Cost: $100 Individual and $375 Team of four
To register or for more information contact Erin Young at 706-655-5666
The 3rd Annual First Responder Luncheon
Sunday, September 11th 12-3 PM
American Legion Post 186
Gay Road, Greenville, GA 30222
You can help by dropping off a dish or dessert or by being on hand to help serve the meal. Please contact Larry Dunaway for more information at lsdunaway@wirelesshometown.com
Home Gardening, Food Production and Nutrition Seminar
Hosted by Harris County Extension and Chipley Coop
Monday, September 19th 9:30 AM-3:00 PM
Chipley Coop at 204 N. King Street Pine Mountain GA 31822
Topics covered include basics of planting a vegetable garden; variety selection; organic production; and food nutrition, preservation and safety.
Pre-registration is required by September 14th by calling the Harris County Extension office at 706-628-4824.
For more information please visit:
http://ugaextension.org/…/agriculture-and-natural-resources…
2016 Meriwether County Teen Maze
Volunteers Needed
Friday, September 23 8:00 AM-2:00 PM
At the old Greenville Middle School auditorium
TEEN MAZE is an organization that promotes awareness about various issues and problems facing adolescents within the community. Ninth graders will navigate through a life-size maze that offers real life choices in order to discover the consequences of their behaviors. Along the path, professionals in their field of expertise present information to students. The TEEN MAZE is designed to allow young people the opportunity to explore lifelike situations and their consequences without real-life permanency.
Teens will be given a scenario and then experience the consequences of the fate dealt to them, whether it is pregnancy, STD from unprotected sex, texting while driving, sexting or death from driving under the influence of alcohol. Our goal is for youth to understand their choices regarding sex, alcohol, tobacco, and drugs.
If you are interested in volunteering, please contact:
Lisa Parker at 706-672-1118 or lparker@pathwayscsb.org for the necessary forms or you can contact me (scj24262@uga.edu) and I will email them to you.
International Professional Rodeo Association
Southeast Region Finals Rodeo at Quercus Farms
October 14th and 15th 8:00 PM
Flat Shoals Road, Gay Georgia 30218
The rodeo benefits veterans through RACE FOR THE WOUNDED: http://raceforthewounded.com/
Tickets go on sale Oct 1st
Tickets are $12; 6 and under free
Get advanced tickets at Shady Days in Gay Arts and Craft Festival on Oct 1st & 2nd for only $10
Come ride a horse before the show. Bring the kids to have their face painted. Lots of food and fun so don't miss out. Gates open at 6 and the action (bareback and saddle bronc riding, barrel racing, bull riding, roping and steer wrestling) starts at 8. Free parking
For more information contact:
Susan Pritchett, SRFR Representative, at 678-603-0038 or susan@srfrodeo.com or visit: http://www.srfrodeo.com/
Great American Clean-Up in Meriwether County
Volunteers Needed
Saturday, October 22nd 8:00 AM-4:00 PM
It’s time to start signing up again! Help Keep Meriwether Beautiful by cleaning up trash around your home or business on this day.
We have sign-up forms on our table outside our office or you can contact me (scj24262@uga.edu) and I will email them to you.
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Susan C James
Agriculture and Natural Resources Agent
UGA Extension-Meriwether County
706-672-4235 Office

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UGA Extension Meriwether County ANR E-Newsletter
August 12, 2016


LIVESTOCK and FORAGES ASSISTANCE FROM FSA 

I’m still getting questions about the USDA FSA Livestock Forage Program (LFP) for losses due to drought including which counties are eligible. I’ve reprinted below what was in this week’s Georgia State FSA Newsletter:
LFP provides compensation to eligible livestock producers who suffer grazing losses for covered livestock due to drought on privately owned or cash leased land in ELIGIBLE counties.
ONLY Producers in the following 53 counties are eligible to apply for 2016 Livestock Forage Disaster Program (LFP) benefits on native pasture, improved pasture, and forage sorghum. At the time that this article was written:
BANKS, BARROW, BARTOW, BUTTS, CARROLL, CATOOSA, CHATTOOGA, CHEROKEE, CLAYTON, COBB, COWETA, DADE, DAWSON, DEKALB, DOUGLAS, ELBERT, FANNIN, FAYETTE, FLOYD, FORSYTH, FRANKLIN, FULTON, GILMER, GORDON, GWINNETT, HABERSHAM, HALL, HARRIS, HART, HEARD, HENRY, JACKSON, LAMAR, LUMPKIN, MADISON, MERIWETHER, MURRAY, NEWTON, PAULDING, PICKENS, PIKE, RABUN, ROCKDALE, SPALDING, STEPHENS, TALBOT, TROUP, UNION, UPSON, WALKER, WALTON, WHITE, WHITFIELD
NOTE: Eligibility is updated every Thursday and additional counties may become eligible in future weeks; please check with your local FSA county office to see if your county is eligible.
County Offices can only accept LFP applications after notification is received from the National Office that they are in a county with a qualifying drought rating. IMPORTANT - County eligibility is based solely on the U.S. Drought Monitor Rating for Georgia and neither the FSA State Office nor County Offices have any input into the determination of LFP eligibility for a county.

Eligible livestock producers must complete a CCC-853 and the required supporting documentation no later than January 30, 2017 for 2016 losses. Producers with cash-leased land are required to provide written lease agreements from the land owner containing specific information on the rented land. In addition, grazing land for which benefits are requested under LFP are required to have been reported to the FSA office; if the land has not already been reported, a late-filed acreage report can be accepted but a “late-filing” fee will be assessed.
Additional Information about LFP, including eligible livestock is available at your local FSA County Office. For Meriwether County contact Dave Carpenter at 770-832-8942 or david.carpenter@ga.usda.gov
Last week most of Meriwether County was upgraded to Extreme Drought status. This week a small portion of the SE corner was downgraded to Severe Drought, but the rest of the county remains in Extreme Drought status. We have had rain, some heavy, scattered throughout the county this past week but I know there are some folks who have not had any relief.
To see the most recent drought monitor map for Georgia please visit:
http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/Home/StateDroughtMonitor.aspx…
To learn about all of the FSA disaster programs please visit:
http://www.fsa.usda.gov/p…/disaster-assistance-program/index
To sign up to receive email updates from FSA please visit to enroll: https://public.govdelivery.com/accoun…/USFSA/subscriber/new/
HAY
If any of you have hay for sale or know of someone with this year’s hay for sale please send me their contact information so I can pass it on to the folks who are calling me about buying hay.
REDUCE HAY LOSSES:
This year is a good year for folks to invest in a hay feeder ring or rack if they haven’t already done so. Up to 50% of a round bale left in the field without a feeder ring can be lost to waste and spoilage. Hay will remain a valuable resource for the rest of this year and may be very difficult to acquire-don’t waste it.
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USDA’s NATIONAL AGRICULTURAL STATISTICS SERVICE
GEORGIA FIELD OFFICE
NASS released some 2015-2016 economic and demographic statistics this week concerning farm expenditures, farm labor and farm land values for the state of Georgia and/or the southeast. Some of you who are not farmers may want to take a look to see what kind of expenses farmers have. Please visit:
https://www.nass.usda.gov/…/Economic_and_Demographic_Relea…/
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STRAWBERRY GROWERS
Bed preparation and planting time for strawberries is not that far away. I have some updates for growers who missed the annual strawberry grower’s meeting this Monday in Macon. Fungicide spray recommendations will remain about the same. Use Captan or Thiram (you can rotate them) for the majority of the season. Sprays can begin in the spring with flowering. Use other labeled fungicides when disease pressure is high, especially for botrytis/gray mold. Pay attention to the FRAC number, which pertains to the mode of action. Do not use any chemicals with the same FRAC number for more than two consecutive applications. Ridomil Gold (mefenoxam) may be applied through drip irrigation two weeks after transplanting for Phytopthora.
What’s new?
Researchers have now learned that Botrytis cinerea, the pathogen that causes gray mold of strawberries, has conidia (spores) that can survive in the soil. It was a common practice to remove berries damaged with gray mold from plants and throw them in the row middles and then run over them with tractor tires. This practice should stop. Plants should still be cleaned of damaged fruit but the berries should be removed completely from the field.
Two of the weather stations, Alto and Baxley, from the UGA Weather Network have been added to the AgroClimate Strawberry Advisory System (SAS). You can go to the website below and see what the data from the stations is saying regarding the risks of either botrytis or anthracnose infection. If the risk is high a fungicide application should be made. The problem with this system is that the weather stations are so far from fields here in Meriwether that warnings may not apply. One of the main factors for determining if an application is needed is duration of leaf wetness, which can really vary in fields just a few miles away from each other. And these stations are over 100 miles away. But there is other good information on the website so check it out by visiting:
http://agroclimate.org/tools/strawberry/
If you look at SC on the map at the website above, you can find the Keisler station in the middle of the state. I spent three years as a Clemson Extension Field Specialist maintaining this station and tending the strawberry plots at this farm that were part of the research project that gave birth to the advisory system. Basically, we found by using the system fungicide applications could be reduced up to 50%. Less use of fungicides will save growers money but it also helps reduce the selection for fungicide resistance development in disease pathogens, such as Botrytis.
The commercial version of the Georgia Pest Management Handbook refers berry and grape growers to the Southern Region Small Fruits Consortium. The home page is below:
http://smallfruits.org/SmallFruitsRegGuide/index.htm
For specific strawberry pest management visit this page:
http://smallfruits.org/…/…/2016/2016SEStrawberryIPMGuide.pdf
For the strawberry production plasticulture guide visit this page:
http://www.smallfruits.org/…/…/2005culturalguidepart1bs1.pdf
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CAES Sustainable Agriculture Summer Newsletter 2016 
The newsletter has a good article on overseeding cool season annual forages for grass-fed cattle production:
http://sustainagga.org/…/Sustainable_Ag_UGA_Summer_2016_New…
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PEST OF THE WEEK
This week’s pest is not one that I’ve found or know a lot about. Dr. Mike Mengak of the UGA Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources sent out a request this week for help in informing folks about a new survey concerning wild pigs, wild hogs, feral swine and feral hogs harvested in Georgia. The survey, as well as the Georgia Landowner's Guide to Wild Pig Management, can be found at http://www.georgiawildpigs.com/
Mike is conducting this survey as part of the Georgia Wild Pig work that he has been involved with since 2012. If you can give him some help with his survey that would be great. There were landowners, including one farmer, in the Odessadale area back in June and July who had issues with recently escaped hogs. That is the only area and incidence of hogs running loose or causing damage that I have been made aware of here in Meriwether. If there have been more incidences, please let me know.
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PROGRAMS
WILDLIFE
Wildlife Program
For Harris, Meriwether, Muscogee and Troup Counties
PLANTING FOOD PLOTS FOR DEER: THE HOW, WHERE, WHY AND WHEN
Presented by Dr. Mark McConnell, UGA Wildlife Outreach Specialist
Thursday, September 1st 6:30-8:00 PM
At Oakhurst Farm 19888 HWY 219 West Point, GA
This program is free.
Coffee, drinks and snacks will be available.
To pre-register please contact Angie Ledford at 706-672-4235,
For more information contact Susan at scj24262@uga.edu
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POULTRY
Backyard Poultry Flock Management Program
Tuesday, October 4th from7:00-8:30 PM
Dr. Casey Ritz, UGA Poultry Science Department 
Basic Management, Breed Selection, and Disease Prevention
Tuesday, October 11th from7:00-8:30 PM
Dr. Brian Kiepper, UGA Poultry Science Department 
Meat Chicken Processing and Food Safety
Tuesday, October 18th from7:00-8:30 PM
Dr. Claudia Dunkley, UGA Poultry Science Department 
Bird Behavior, Housing and Management, Layer Production
Bogle Farms
1785 Harman Road
Greenville, GA, 30222
Cost:
$20 for attending all 3 classes (includes all course materials and a certificate, if all classes are attended)
$10 per single session class (includes course material but no certificate)
Coffee, drinks and snacks will be available.
Egg Candling Class
Friday, October 7th from 10:00 AM-3:00 PM
Georgia Department of Agriculture: Ben Pitts, Instructor
Manchester Public Library Meeting Room
218 Perry Street ~ Manchester, GA
If you plan to sell your eggs to individuals, or at a farmers market, an egg candling certificate from the Georgia Department of Agriculture is required.
The class will last about four hours, including one hour of classroom instruction, followed by a written examination and a hands-on candling examination.
If you want to review the recommended study materials for the written examination and candling examination before the class:
The Georgia Egg Law can be obtained from the Georgia Department of Agriculture on line at: www.legis.state.ga.us/legis/gacode/index.htm
There will be a one-hour lunch break on your own. The class is free and open to any interested Georgia resident.
To pre-register for the class and to get a copy of the required affidavit of lawful presence, please call the Meriwether County Extension office at 706-672-4235.
If you have any questions please contact Susan James at scj24262@uga.edu or Ben Pitts at Benjamin.Pitts@agr.georgia.gov
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LIVESTOCK and FORAGES
HERD Field Day
Wednesday, August 31st, 9 AM-4 PM
UGA Alapaha Beef Unit
20038 HWY 129, Alapaha, 31622
Join UGA Extension for an educational Field Day enhancing practical knowledge and discovering more of what the Georgia Heifer Evaluation and Reproductive Development Programs are all about! Registration with coffee and donuts begins at 8 AM.
Registration includes all materials, seminars, BQA Certification, and lunch. The program will include:
· BQA Training: Parts 1& 2
· Heifer Development Strategies for Optimal Reproduction
· Consumer Perceptions and Education
· BQA Demo: Low Stress Handling and Proper Vaccine Administration
· A. l. Synchronization and Protocol Introduction
· H.E.R.D. Program: Grading and Disposition Scoring
Cost: $15.00 if postmarked by August 8th; then $25.00.
For more information or to register please visit: http://blog.extension.uga.edu/…/06/herd-field-day-august-3…/
Calving Techniques Class
Presented by Dr. Lee Jones, UGA College of Veterinary Medicine
October 3rd starting at 6:30 PM
Lemmon Cattle Enterprises at 16810 Woodbury Hwy, Woodbury, GA 30293
Lee will be teaching simple calving-difficulty assistance techniques. He will also talk about lambing and kidding difficulties for those who are interested, so small ruminant folks should attend also! Coffee, drinks and snacks will be available. This class is free.
To pre-register please call our office at 706-672-4235 or for more information please contact Susan James at scj24262@uga.edu
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OTHER COMMUNITY EVENTS
2nd Annual Roosevelt Warm Springs Development Fund Benefit
Clay Shooting Tournament-All Ages Event
Saturday, August 27 10:00 AM-1:00 PM
Big Red Oak Plantation Gay, GA
bigredoakplantation.com
Advanced registration is required
Cost: $100 Individual and $375 Team of four
To register or for more information contact Erin Young at 706-655-5666
New Event Listing!
The 3rd Annual First Responder Luncheon
Sunday, September 11th 12-3 PM
American Legion Post 186
Gay Road, Greenville, GA 30222
You can help by dropping off a dish or dessert or by being on hand to help serve the meal. Please contact Larry Dunaway for more information at lsdunaway@wirelesshometown.com
International Professional Rodeo Association
Southeast Region Finals Rodeo at Quercus Farms
October 14th and 15th 8:00 PM
Flat Shoals Road, Gay Georgia 30218
The rodeo benefits veterans through RACE FOR THE WOUNDED: http://raceforthewounded.com/
Tickets go on sale Oct 1st
Tickets are $12; 6 and under free
Get advanced tickets at Shady Days in Gay Arts and Craft Festival on Oct 1st & 2nd for only $10
Come ride a horse before the show. Bring the kids to have their face painted. Lots of food and fun so don't miss out. Gates open at 6 and the action (bareback and saddle bronc riding, barrel racing, bull riding, roping and steer wrestling) starts at 8. Free parking
For more information contact:
Susan Pritchett, SRFR Representative, at 678-603-0038 or susan@srfrodeo.com or visit: http://www.srfrodeo.com/
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Wishing everyone a great weekend,
Susan
Susan C James
Agriculture and Natural Resources Agent
UGA Extension-Meriwether County
706-672-4235 Office

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Commissioners to hold Special Work Session on Lake Meriwether Trail Project

 

MERIWETHER COUNTY BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS

 

PUBLIC NOTICE

 

In accordance with O.C.G.A. 50-14-1, The Meriwether County Board of Commissioners will hold a Work Session on Wednesday, August 10, 2016, immediately following the 9:00 am Board of Commissioners Meeting. The meeting will be held in the Commissioners Chambers located at 17234 Roosevelt Hwy., Bldg. B, Greenville, GA. The purpose of the Work Session is to discuss the Lake Meriwether Trail Project.

The Public is invited to attend. 

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Cong. Lynn Westmoreland's staff holding Mobile Office Hours in West Point and McDonough

"My staff will be holding mobile office hours on Tuesday, August 16th in McDonough and West Point, Georgia. My district office is permanently located in Newnan, and the mobile office hours serve as an opportunity for constituents to speak with a representative from my office in a location closer to their home. Constituents may attend the mobile office hours to gather more information on the services the district office provides, and how to get help with a federal agency.

Navigating the federal government can be confusing, and I want folks to know that my staff is here to help. Whether it is trouble with Veterans Affairs, the IRS, or Social Security – my staff is ready to step in on your behalf. I encourage anyone with questions or in need of assistance to attend these mobile office hours in McDonough and West Point, and learn how my office can better serve you.
The McDonough mobile office hours will be held by my Field Representative James Ruvalcaba, and the West Point office hours will be held by Field Representative Colin Martin.
McDonough Office Hours with James Ruvalcaba
Tuesday, August 16, 2016

10:00am – 12:00pm
McDonough City Hall
136 Keys Ferry Street
McDonough, GA 30253
West Point Office Hours with Colin Martin
Tuesday, August 16, 2016

10:00am – 12:00pm
West Point Depot
500 3rd Avenue 
West Point, GA 31833
If you are unable to attend these office hours and need help with a federal agency or have more questions, please contact my Newnan District Office at 770-683-2033 or visit www.Westmoreland.House.gov ."

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UGA Extension Meriwether County ANR E-Newsletter
August 5, 2016

PESTS OF THE WEEK
Some years you just can't miss fungicide applications and expect to get edible fruit off of your fruit trees. Most commercial operations spray their fruit trees regularly throughout the growing and dormant seasons to guarantee that they will have a crop to sell.

Home gardeners can choose to by-pass the sprays to avoid putting pesticides on their fruit but they need to understand that some years disease or pest pressures will be so high that there will be no harvest. It’s been so hot and dry this summer that many of you may have forgotten how wet it was earlier this year. The temperatures were very mild also during the winter and spring months. These two combined created an excellent environment for disease infection of flowers and/or developing fruit. In earlier issues of the newsletter I mentioned seeing both fireblight and rust on apples. I can now add bitter rot and black rot to the list. Almost all of the apples on trees that I looked at this week, in one garden, were infected with one of these two diseases.

Both are common fungal diseases of apple that occur in the southeastern US. On the fruit pictured below, the initial infection probably occurred months ago while it was still rainy. The disease continued to develop until the apples, now, look rotten. On the apples with bitter rot you can see where pustules of spores have developed concentric rings. The black rot normally develops at the blossom end and also has concentric rings but not of spores. The spot almost has the look of a shiner- as if the apple was bruised. Unfortunately the gardener was too busy working at his day job as a farmer to realize that his fruit trees were desperately in need of fungicide applications. And as you can imagine, it is way too late now to try to save the fruit. With both of these diseases sanitation is critical. The damaged fruit should be removed from the tree and ground below and then bagged or destroyed. This task may be hazardous because of the bees and wasps on the fruit, so be cautious. Very early or late in the day may be a good time to tackle this job. Any cankers on stems or dead wood, which can harbor spores, should be pruned out also. This pruning should include any dead tissue due to fireblight infection because the spores from bitter rot and black rot can survive on this tissue also. Sterilize pruners in between cuts.
I would highly recommend fungicide sprays for these trees next year even if the weather is not as wet or mild as this year. The potential for inoculum to remain on the trees or on the ground in debris under these trees is just too great even with good sanitation. Fungicide sprays for black rot should begin at silver tip which is when swollen buds in early spring begin to “break” dormancy and show a silver color. The optimum temperature for bitter rot infection is 80°F and it can happen within the very short period of just five hours. Fungicide sprays should begin after fruit set for bitter rot. Depending on the chemical used and the amount of rainfall, applications may need to be repeated every 7-14 days. Read the label of the fungicide that you use carefully to know how often you may apply it. For the different recommended fungicides visit: http://www.ent.uga.edu/…/GA-Pest-Management-2016-Home-ORCHA… and scroll down to page 4 (54) or contact me.
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WILDLIFE
Wildlife Program
For Harris, Meriwether, Muscogee and Troup Counties
PLANTING FOOD PLOTS FOR DEER: THE HOW, WHERE, WHY AND WHEN
Presented by Dr. Mark McConnell, UGA Wildlife Outreach Specialist
Thursday, September 1st 6:30-8:00 PM
At Oakhurst Farm 19888 HWY 219 West Point, GA
This program is free.
Coffee, drinks and snacks will be available.
To pre-register please contact Angie Ledford at 706-672-4235,
For more information contact Susan at scj24262@uga.edu
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POULTRY
Backyard Poultry Flock Management Program
We had two local businesses offer to host the poultry program-County Line Café in Luthersville, owned and operated by Bonnie and Paul Parker, and Bogle Farms, owned and operated by Gail and Thom Bogle. Since Paul, who is a Luthersville City Council member, had a conflict for one of the evenings (the monthly City Council meeting) we will have this program at Bogle Farms. The Parkers definitely plan to help out with programs in the future. If you visit the café and see Bonnie and Paul or run into Gail or Thom, please thank them for their generosity. Without this very critical assistance from these folks and the Coffeys of Dogwood Farm (Small Ruminant Program in March), the Marlowes of Oakhurst Farms (Wildlife Program), and The Lemmons of Lemmon Cattle Enterprises (Calving Techniques Class), we would not have a facility at which to have these programs.
Tuesday, October 4th from7:00-8:30 PM
Dr. Casey Ritz, UGA Poultry Science Department 
Basic Management, Breed Selection, and Disease Prevention
Tuesday, October 11th from7:00-8:30 PM
Dr. Brian Kiepper, UGA Poultry Science Department 
Meat Chicken Processing and Food Safety
Tuesday, October 18th from7:00-8:30 PM
Dr. Claudia Dunkley, UGA Poultry Science Department 
Bird Behavior, Housing and Management, Layer Production
Bogle Farms
1785 Harman Road
Greenville, GA, 30222
Cost:
$20 for attending all 3 classes (includes all course materials and a certificate, if all classes are attended)
$10 per single session class (includes course material but no certificate)
Coffee, drinks and snacks will be available.

Egg Candling Class
Friday, October 7th from 10:00 AM-3:00 PM
Georgia Department of Agriculture: Ben Pitts, Instructor
Manchester Public Library Meeting Room
218 Perry Street ~ Manchester, GA
If you plan to sell your eggs to individuals, or at a farmers market, an egg candling certificate from the Georgia Department of Agriculture is required.
The class will last about four hours, including one hour of classroom instruction, followed by a written examination and a hands-on candling examination.
If you want to review the recommended study materials for the written examination and candling examination before the class:
The Georgia Egg Law can be obtained from the Georgia Department of Agriculture on line at: www.legis.state.ga.us/legis/gacode/index.htm
There will be a one-hour lunch break on your own. The class is free and open to any interested Georgia resident.
To pre-register for the class and to get a copy of the required affidavit of lawful presence, please call the Meriwether County Extension office at 706-672-4235.
If you have any questions please contact Susan James at scj24262@uga.edu or Ben Pitts at Benjamin.Pitts@agr.georgia.gov
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LIVESTOCK and FORAGES
Farm Service Agency
Remember, help may be available for Meriwether County cattlemen through the FSA Disaster Assistance Program. To report Livestock Forage Losses please contact Dave Carpenter at the local FSA office at 770-832-8942 (note this is a different phone number from the one in past issues) or email him at david.carpenter@ga.usda.gov
Remember the possible benefits are for native pasture, improved pasture, and forage sorghum. You have until January 31, 2017 to sign up but eligible losses must occur on or after Jan. 1, 2016, and before December 31, 2016. If you have not reported your grazing land to the FSA in the past and kept your records updated you may have to pay a late-filing fee. To read more about the Livestock Forage Disaster Program please visit: https://www.fsa.usda.gov/…/2016_livestock_forage_disaster_p…
There is also a Livestock Indemnity Program for livestock deaths in excess of normal mortality due to adverse weather and other factors. A notice of loss must be given to the FSA within 30 days of death and supporting documentation presented no later than 30 days after the end of 2016. To learn more about this program visit: https://www.fsa.usda.gov/…/Fac…/2016/lip_fact_sheet_2016.pdf
To receive email updates from FSA please visit:
https://service.govdelivery.com/accou…/USFSA/subscriber/new…
HERD Field Day
Wednesday, August 31st, 9 AM-4 PM
UGA Alapaha Beef Unit
20038 HWY 129, Alapaha, 31622
Join UGA Extension for an educational Field Day enhancing practical knowledge and discovering more of what the Georgia Heifer Evaluation and Reproductive Development Programs are all about! Registration with coffee and donuts begins at 8 AM.
Registration includes all materials, seminars, BQA Certification, and lunch. The program will include:
· BQA Training: Parts 1& 2
· Heifer Development Strategies for Optimal Reproduction
· Consumer Perceptions and Education
· BQA Demo: Low Stress Handling and Proper Vaccine Administration
· A. l. Synchronization and Protocol Introduction
· H.E.R.D. Program: Grading and Disposition Scoring
Cost: $15.00 if postmarked by August 8th; then $25.00.
For more information or to register please visit: http://blog.extension.uga.edu/…/06/herd-field-day-august-3…/
Calving Techniques Class
Presented by Dr. Lee Jones, UGA College of Veterinary Medicine
October 3rd starting at 6:30 PM
Lemmon Cattle Enterprises at 16810 Woodbury Hwy, Woodbury, GA 30293
Lee will be teaching simple calving-difficulty assistance techniques. He will also talk about lambing and kidding difficulties for those who are interested, so small ruminant folks should attend also! Coffee, drinks and snacks will be available. This class is free.
To pre-register please call our office at 706-672-4235 or for more information please contact Susan James at scj24262@uga.edu
UGA Extension Northwest Georgia Master Cattleman Program
September 6-October 25 on Tuesday evenings from 6:30-8:30
Location: 21 Vulcan Materials Road LaGrange, GA 30240
This eight week program will include topics on forages, external parasites, facilities, diseases, reproduction, economics, animal selection, EPD’s, record keeping and more. Program participants that attend six of the eight sessions will receive a certificate of completion and UGA Master Cattleman Cap. Registration is $75 per person and includes a notebook of proceedings, refreshments each night and a steak dinner on the final night. Pre-Registration deadline is August 12, 2016. Checks can be made payable to Troup County Extension or you may call in (706.883.1675) and pay by credit card
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OTHER COMMUNITY EVENTS
2nd Annual Roosevelt Warm Springs Development Fund Benefit
Clay Shooting Tournament-All Ages Event
Saturday, August 27 10:00 AM-1:00 PM
Big Red Oak Plantation Gay, GA
bigredoakplantation.com
Advanced registration is required
Cost: $100 Individual and $375 Team of four
To register or for more information contact Erin Young at 706-655-5666
International Professional Rodeo Association
Southeast Region Finals Rodeo at Quercus Farms
October 14th and 15th 8:00 PM
Flat Shoals Road, Gay Georgia 30218
The rodeo benefits veterans through RACE FOR THE WOUNDED: http://raceforthewounded.com/
Tickets go on sale Oct 1st
Tickets are $12; 6 and under free
Get advanced tickets at Shady Days in Gay Arts and Craft Festival on Oct 1st & 2nd for only $10
Come ride a horse before the show. Bring the kids to have their face painted. Lots of food and fun so don't miss out. Gates open at 6 and the action (bareback and saddle bronc riding, barrel racing, bull riding, roping and steer wrestling) starts at 8. Free parking
For more information contact:
Susan Pritchett, SRFR Representative, at 678-603-0038 or susan@srfrodeo.com
or visit: http://www.srfrodeo.com/
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LOCAL MARKET
For local sources of beef or pork from animals reared without steroids or antibiotics;
Oak Hill Cattle Company for grain fed Angus and Angus cross beef at http://oakhillcattle.com/
Happy Hogs for pasture reared pork at http://www.homeofhappyhogs.com/
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I hope everyone has a great weekend!
Susan

Susan C James
Agriculture and Natural Resources Agent
UGA Extension-Meriwether County
706-672-4235 Office

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Information meeting set in Lone Oak on proposed Meriwether Fire District

The Proposed Meriwether County Fire District focus of Lone Oak meeting 7 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 2 at Community Building.

Meriwether County Commissioner Shirley Hines will host a town hall meeting in Lone Oak, Ga., Tuesday, Aug. 2 at 7 p.m. to discuss the proposed Meriwether fire district referendum that will be on the Nov. 8 ballot.

Meriwether citizens will be asked to vote on establishing a fire district to include funding for maintenance, operation and staffing of the Meriwether County Fire Dept. The district is proposed to include the entire area of unincorporated Meriwether County and the cities of Gay, Greenville, Luthersville, Lone Oak, Warm Springs and Woodbury. Funding would be via a levy of a dedicated millage rate on all properties subject to taxation, not to exceed three mills in any given tax year. The town hall meeting will be at the Lone Oak Community Building, the location used as the Lone Oak polling place.

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Late Luthersville Mayor Bob Trammell Sr. to be remembered

Here are the funeral arrangements for Lutherville Mayor Bob Trammell Sr. who passed away Tuesday, July 26:


Obituary for Robert Thomas Trammell, Sr.
February 9, 1939 - July 26, 2016


Robert Thomas Trammell, Sr., 77, of Luthersville died Tuesday, July 26, 2016, at Harbor Grace Hospice in Atlanta, following a hemorrhagic stroke he suffered at home in Luthersville. Mr. Trammell was born in Coweta County, near Luthersville, on February 9, 1939, to the late James Young Trammell, Sr. and Carney Jane Hunter Trammell. He attended school in Luthersville for 10 years and graduated from Newnan High School in 1957. He earned the baccalaureate degree Magna Cum Laude from Mercer University, a master’s degree from the University of Florida, and a doctorate degree from Auburn University. He began his professorial career at Truett-McConnell College, where he met his future wife, Menlia Faye Moss. He was subsequently on the faculty for several years at Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College in Tifton. In 1969, he went to Macon College (now Middle Georgia State University) as Head of the Faculty of English. In 1970, he was named Chair of the Humanities Division, and in 1977 he became the Academic Dean of the college. He served as the Vice President for Academic Affairs there for 22 years. Under his leadership, an award-winning Honors Program and three baccalaureate programs were established. Mr. Trammell retired in 1998 in order to return home to Luthersville to care for his mother, who had Alzheimer’s Disease. In January 1999, Mr. Trammell became mayor of Luthersville, a position he held until his death. He was a proud ambassador for the city, maintaining Luthersville as a good place to live. A member of Central Baptist Church in Newnan, he was President of the Myrtle Arnall Mann Sunday school class. He had also served as a deacon at Luthersville Baptist; First Baptist, Macon; and Central Baptist, Newnan. The funeral service will be on Saturday, July 30, 2016, at 2 p.m. at Central Baptist Church, Newnan with Dr. Winford Hendrix, Rev. Rhodes Skinner and Rev. Winston Skinner officiating. Interment will follow at the Luthersville City Cemetery. The body will lie in repose for public viewing at City Hall in Luthersville from 1-3 p.m. on Friday, July 29, 2016. Visitation will follow on Friday, July 29, 2016, from 6-8 p.m. at McKoon Funeral Home in Newnan. Survivors include his wife, Menlia Trammell, whom he married December 20, 1970; daughter and son-in-law, Carmen and Jonathan Skaggs of Marietta; son and daughter-in-law, Bob and Jenny Trammell of Luthersville; granddaughters, Mary and Virginia Trammell of Luthersville; grandsons, Nathan and Logan Skaggs of Marietta; sister and brother-in-law, Sara Jane and Walter Skinner of Moreland; brother and sister-in-law, Young and Linda Trammell of Conyers; nieces and nephews. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Alzheimer’s Association, Georgia Chapter, 41 Perimeter Center East, Suite 550, Atlanta, GA 30346 (http://www.alz.org/georgia/) or the Meriwether Ferst Foundation for Childhood Literacy, Box 576, Luthersville, GA 30251. Online condolences may be expressed at www.mckoon.com.McKoon Funeral Home, Newnan, 770-253-4580.

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UGA Extension Meriwether County ANR E-Newsletter
July 29, 2016


Pests of the Week
Leaf Rust (Puccinia cynodontis) --
We had another forage problem show up this week in the county. Rust was found in fields of Alicia Bermudagrass. These fields started turning yellow overnight. When looked at closely blade tips were browning and if looked at even closer with a hand lens rust pustules could be seen (see images).

Close-by fields of coastal Bermuda, which is more resistant to the disease, did not have rust. The infected fields also had a rain event last weekend that was a contributing factor.

Other possible factors are mentioned below in what Dr. Dennis Hancock, UGA Forage Extension Specialist, has to say about the disease:

Management: Bermudagrass varieties that are not as resistant as other varieties to these diseases can be the first problem. When preparing to establish new plantings of bermudagrass, select hybrid varieties (e.g., Tifton 85, Russell, Coastal, Tifton 44, etc.) that exhibit some level of disease resistance to decrease possible infection. Annually, most reports of leaf spot/rust are in common bermudagrass varieties or other varieties that are known to be susceptible (e.g., Alicia, World Feeder, etc.)…Another important factor is soil fertility. Low soil potassium (K) levels in bermudagrass have been linked to increased disease and decreased stand. If soil tests do not recommend potash application and disease symptoms are still apparent, collect forage samples to determine potassium levels through tissue analysis. Other management considerations include timely harvest, minimized thatch, and water management.
There are no chemical control options for leaf spot/rust. Regularly burning bermudagrass fields in late February or early March (at least 1 out of every 3 years) can drastically reduce the incidence of these disease problems because it reduces the residual forage that hosts the spores. Removing infected material and fertilizing to overcome nutrient deficiencies are currently the only options found to be effective to control leaf spot/rust.
Dennis mentions low potash as a contributing factor. For those of you who are good about soil testing and fertilizing and still had rust problems (on dry land), the problem could be a lack of potash taken up by plants because there has not been adequate soil moisture. Remember plants take up elements in solution-there has to be water in the soil. And in many areas of the county there just hasn’t been enough rain for adequate take up of soil-derived nutrients.
To read more about leaf spot diagnosis and management in Bermudagrass forages please read this publication by John Andrae, UGA Extension Agronomist; 
Alfredo Martinez, UGA Extension Plant Pathologist and Robert Morgan, UGA Extension Agronomist:
http://extension.uga.edu/publicatio…/files/pdf/C%20887_3.PDF
Oleander or Milkweed Aphid (Aphis nerii)--
Many of you are aware that I have been helping the county put in butterfly gardens in cities around the county. Carolyn McKinley’s vision was to attract Monarchs so there are quite a few Asclepias species (milkweed and butterfly weed) in the two gardens already planted. An oleander (milkweed) aphid infestation has been an on-going serious problem on the Asclepias plants in one of the gardens. Below I am going to discuss why I believe they have been a problem in one location and not the other.
Both locations have a similar history-old railroad beds. Many of you I know (you blew horns, waved, stopped to chat) had the pleasure of seeing me at the Warm Springs location wielding a mattock-a shovel wouldn’t get through the gravel that was a main component of the old bed. Both locations had soil samples submitted for testing. Soil test results came back and were very similar in the two locations. For old railroad beds they actually weren’t too bad-everything was okay except for low levels of phosphorous and potassium. So soil pH and fertility were very similar in the beginning.
So let’s look at the differences between the two locations. Planting took place in April in the garden where the aphids are; in June where they aren’t. The Asclepias plants in the latter location are actually bigger now and have been blooming more since they have not suffered from aphid-feeding damage. So what happened? In the garden with no aphids I have been the person managing care of the plants. Someone else has been helping with care of the other garden, especially the watering. Three cultural practices that contribute to aphid infestations are: over watering, over fertilizing (especially with nitrogen) and pruning. All of these practices encourage new, lush growth which is just what aphids want to feed on. One day while I was at the aphid infested garden I met and spoke with the person who is responsible for watering. I learned that he had been fertilizing every time that he watered. So, unnecessary fertilizer and possibly, too much water, were being applied every week. The new growth that occurred in response was a magnet for the aphids and I am still battling them even though I requested that the fertilizing stop immediately. Another possibility is that there are more parasitoids or predators of aphids in the garden that doesn’t have them and they have been helping keep the aphids away. I can say that while taking pictures of the aphid infested plants that I did see lacewing eggs on one of the plants. So hopefully there will be lacewing predators feeding on the aphids soon (see next paragraph).
The aphids give me the opportunity to write about a cool thing that some insects are able to do. Probably most of you are aware of how poisonous oleander plants are, but did you know that milkweeds are poisonous too? These plants contain similar cardiac glycosides to those of oleander which the aphids are able to ingest without harm (so do Monarch butterfly larvae). They can use these toxins to protect themselves. Depending upon the level of toxicity of the actual glycosides ingested, the predators that feed on the aphids (such as lacewings) may or may not be harmed. Just the initial contact and taste of the glycosides may keep predators from continuing to feed. The plant species in our garden with the highest number of aphids is Asclepias incarnata, the swamp milkweed. According to work done by researchers at the University of Kentucky (http://aesa.oxfordjournals.org.proxy-remote.galib.uga.edu/…), this species contains more glycosides than other native species of Asclepias. So the aphids in our butterfly garden should be well armed-unfortunately, especially for the lacewings.

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STRAWBERRY GROWERS
Georgia Strawberry Growers Association Annual Meeting
August 9th, 10:00 AM 
Georgia Farm Bureau Building at 1620 Bass Rd. Macon, GA
This year’s meeting will focus on both disease control and resistance management. Guido Schnabel (Clemson University, Plant Pathology) and Natalia Peres (The University of Florida, Plant Pathology) will discuss disease control, resistance monitoring, and disease forecasting.
Ian Flitcroft from the UGA Automated Weather Network will discuss how the weather network can benefit growers and how it is being used to test disease forecasting models in Georgia.
Please let Jeff Cook or me know if you plan to attend. You can reach us at:
Jeff Cook: 478-862-5496 or 478-825-6466 or Susan James: 706-672-4235 or 706-977-0882
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WILDLIFE
WILDLIFE PROGRAM
For Harris, Meriwether, Muscogee and Troup Counties
PLANTING FOOD PLOTS FOR DEER: THE HOW, WHERE, WHY AND WHEN
Presented by Dr. Mark McConnell, UGA Wildlife Outreach Specialist
Thursday, September 1st 6:30-8:00 PM
At Oakhurst Farm 19888 HWY 219 West Point, GA
For more information or to pre-register please contact:
Brian Maddy at 706-883-1675 or Susan James at 706-672-4235
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POULTRY
BACKYARD POULTRY FLOCK MANAGEMENT PROGRAM
The program is waiting for a location. I will let you know when everything is finalized and we are ready for registration.
Tuesday, October 4th from7:00-8:30 PM
Dr. Casey Ritz, UGA Poultry Science Department 
Basic Management, Breed Selection, and Disease Prevention
Tuesday, October 11th from7:00-8:30 PM
Dr. Brian Kiepper, UGA Poultry Science Department 
Meat Chicken Processing and Food Safety
Tuesday, October 18th from7:00-8:30 PM
Dr. Claudia Dunkley, UGA Poultry Science Department 
Bird Behavior, Housing and Management, Layer Production
Egg Candling Class
Friday, October 7th from 10:00 AM-3:00 PM
Georgia Department of Agriculture: Ben Pitts, Instructor
Manchester Public Library Meeting Room
218 Perry Street ~ Manchester, GA
If you plan to sell your eggs to individuals, or at a farmers market, an egg candling certificate from the Georgia Department of Agriculture is required.
The class will last about four hours, including one hour of classroom instruction, followed by a written examination and a hands-on candling examination.
If you want to review the recommended study materials for the written examination and candling examination before the class:
The Georgia Egg Law can be obtained from the Georgia Department of Agriculture on line at: www.legis.state.ga.us/legis/gacode/index.htm
There will be a one-hour lunch break on your own. The class is free and open to any interested Georgia resident.
To pre-register for the class and to get a copy of the required affidavit of lawful presence, please call the Meriwether County Extension office at 706-672-4235.
If you have any questions please contact Susan James at scj24262@uga.edu or Ben Pitts at Benjamin.Pitts@agr.georgia.gov
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LIVESTOCK and FORAGES
Farm Service Agency
Remember, help may be available for Meriwether County cattlemen through the FSA Disaster Assistance Program. To report livestock or grazing losses please contact the local FSA office at 770-834-2097.
To receive email updates from FSA please visit:
https://service.govdelivery.com/accou…/USFSA/subscriber/new…
Calving Techniques Class
Presented by Dr. Lee Jones, UGA College of Veterinary Medicine
October 3rd starting at 6:30 PM
Lemmon Cattle Enterprises at 16810 Woodbury Hwy, Woodbury, GA 30293
Lee will be teaching simple calving-difficulty assistance techniques. He will also talk about lambing and kidding difficulties for those who are interested, so small ruminant folks should attend also! Coffee, drinks and snacks will be available.
To pre-register or for more information please contact Susan James at 706-672-4235 or scj24262@uga.edu
UGA Extension Northwest Georgia Master Cattleman Program
September 6-October 25 on Tuesday evenings from 6:30-8:30
Location: 21 Vulcan Materials Road LaGrange, GA 30240
This eight week program will include topics on forages, external parasites, facilities, diseases, reproduction, economics, animal selection, EPD’s, record keeping and more. Program participants that attend six of the eight sessions will receive a certificate of completion and UGA Master Cattleman Cap. Registration is $75 per person and includes a notebook of proceedings, refreshments each night and a steak dinner on the final night. Pre-Registration deadline is August 12, 2016. Checks can be made payable to Troup County Extension or you may call in (706.883.1675) and pay by credit card
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OTHER COMMUNITY EVENTS
2nd Annual Roosevelt Warm Springs Development Fund Benefit
Clay Shooting Tournament-All Ages Event
Saturday, August 27 10:00 AM-1:00 PM
Big Red Oak Plantation Gay, GA
bigredoakplantation.com
Advanced registration is required
Cost: $100 Individual and $375 Team of four
To register or for more information contact Erin Young at 706-655-5666
International Professional Rodeo Association
Southeast Region Finals Rodeo at Quercus Farms
October 14th and 15th 8:00 PM
Flat Shoals Road, Gay Georgia 30218
The rodeo benefits veterans through RACE FOR THE WOUNDED: http://raceforthewounded.com/
Tickets go on sale Oct 1st
Tickets are $12; 6 and under free
Get advanced tickets at Shady Days in Gay Arts and Craft Festival on Oct 1st & 2nd for only $10
Come ride a horse before the show. Bring the kids to have their face painted. Lots of food and fun so don't miss out. Gates open at 6 and the action (bareback and saddle bronc riding, barrel racing, bull riding, roping and steer wrestling) starts at 8. Free parking
For more information contact:
Susan Pritchett, SRFR Representative, at 678-603-0038 or susan@srfrodeo.com
or visit: http://www.srfrodeo.com/
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LOCAL MARKET
Bill Nash has registered German shorthaired pointers (bird dogs) with working gun dog bloodlines for sale. Tails are docked and dew claws removed. They will be up to date with shots at 6 weeks. Contact Bill at 706-881-0031 or at greenacreskennel14@yahoo.com
There are still lots of fresh vegetables and peaches at our local Meriwether County farms.
Carroll Farms’ new shed on Carroll Chunn Road outside of Woodbury is now open. They are also selling their produce at their stand at the traffic light in Woodbury.
A couple of Meriwether County growers near Pine Mountain sell their produce at the Chipley Community Co-op at 205 N. King street in Pine Mountain, including Terry and Mike at Strickland Brothers Farm and Jerry Armstrong. The hours for the co-op are Tuesday and Thursday: 9-1; Friday: 4-6 and Saturday 8-1. You can also contact Terry at 706-881-2414 to pick up produce at the farm.
Fitzgerald Fruit Farms is on Imlac Road outside of Woodbury. You can contact them at 706-553-2795 or visit www.fitzgeraldfruitfarms.com
Hudson Farms has two locations to visit. The store at the traffic light in Woodbury is open Monday-Saturday: 9-5 and on Sundays: 10-5. The store on Raleigh Road is open Wednesday-Sunday: 9-5.
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Hope you have a great weekend,
Susan

Susan C James
Agriculture and Natural Resources Agent
UGA Extension-Meriwether County
706-672-4235 Office

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Meriwether receives second state tourism grant for 'Murals and Monarchs Trail'

July 27, 2016

Meriwether County, through the Meriwether County Industrial Development Authority, has received a second state tourism grant to continue its "Meriwether Murals and Monarchs Trail" project.
The City of Woodbury will be getting the next in the series of historic paintings being created by artist John Christian, who has already completed murals in Warm Springs and Lone Oak. Butterfly gardens in Warm Springs and Luthersville are also part of the tourism effort, an idea inspired by a butterfly garden in Plains, Ga., home of President Jimmy Carter. First Lady Rosalynn Carter is a supporter of efforts to save the dwindling Monarch Butterfly population. Meriwether is part of the Presidential Pathways travel region.
Christian was in Woodbury for a mural kickoff event with local officials and supporters Monday evening.
The grant also includes funding for a mural in Greenville, the design of which is still being finalized.

Draft design for the Woodbury historic mural, being painted by artist John Christian on the side of the U Save It Pharmacy at the corner of Main Street and Durand Street. When completed, the mural will be 45’ long and 12’ high.

Artist John Christian, second from left, with project supporters at the kickoff for the Woodbury mural project Monday, July 25.

The Georgia Department of Economic Development’s Tourism division announced Wednesday, July 27, that it has awarded more than $85,275 in product development agreements to 13 new and expanding tourism projects across the state. Recipient projects include the Woodbury mural and a separate project for the City of Manchester -- "Making the PRESIDENT THEATRE Sparkle."
In an effort to further tourism product development within the state, Georgia Tourism offers this grant to communities who participated in the department’s Tourism Product Development Resource Team program as a way to build product outlined in the resource team’s reports. The Tourism Product Development Resource Team program works to evaluate a community’s potential for tourism growth and development through innovative and unique experiences based on a community’s local culture and heritage.
“The Tourism Product Development Resource Team has streamlined its initiative in assisting our communities with funding, which is one of the greatest needs in fortifying tourism product development in Georgia,” said Cindy Eidson, director of Tourism Product Development for the Georgia Department of Economic Development. “By providing funds to projects that we help inspire, we are jump-starting tourism economic development across the state, helping to not only grow Georgia’s tourism offerings, but also creating jobs and sustainable economic development in these communities.”
Georgia Tourism’s Product Development team has served 31 counties, cities, private for-profits and non-profits throughout the state in areas ranging from agritourism to downtown development.
The Tourism Product Development Resource Team Community Funding Program allows the communities served to build new product from the recommendations made by the Tourism Product Development Resource Team members or supports projects the community has developed as an expansion of the resource team’s recommendations.
The recommendations and financial support provided through this funding program is designed to spur tourism development activities at the local level that maintain and create jobs, attract tourists, and enhance the visitor experience.
The Woodbury mural is the third mural to be painted of the seven planned – one in each municipality in Meriwether County.
Recipients of the 2016 Tourism Product Development Funding Program include:
• Adel-Cook County Tourism Authority – Letters from a Confederate Soldier
• Berrien County Chamber of Commerce – Nashville South Jams 
• City of Dublin – Martin L. King, Jr. Monument Phase 1C 
• City of Manchester – Making the PRESIDENT THEATRE Sparkle 
• City of Springfield – Springfield Ebenezer Creek Greenway Website and Tour App 
• Development Authority of the City of Folkston and Charlton County – Folkston Gateway Signage 
• Douglas County – “Caught on Camera”: Film Trail of Douglas County Georgia 
• Dublin Downtown Development Authority – Downtown Dublin Mobile & Audio Tour 
• Eatonton-Putnam Downtown Development Authority – Bike Tour Brochure
• Eatonton-Putnam Downtown Development Authority – Eatonton-Putnam Briar Patch Pocket Parks 
• Liberty County Industrial Authority – Gateway Heritage Rehabilitation & Renewal 
• Meriwether County Industrial Development Authority – Meriwether County Murals Trail 
• Sandersville Downtown Development Authority – Kaolin Banner Project
The Georgia Tourism review panel consists of members from the public and private sector as well as fellow professionals who are experienced in the tourism industry or the type of grant being reviewed.

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Gov. Deal orders flags at half-staff

According to an Executive Order from Governor Deal's Office, Flags are to be lowered to Half-Staff through sunset on Friday, July 22, 2016 to mourn the lives of three law enforcement officers who were killed and three law enforcement officers who were injured in Baton Rouge, Louisiana on July 17, 2016.
 
Please keep these families in your thoughts and prayers as well as all other Law Enforcement officers and First Responders who put their lives on the line each day to protect and serve.
 
Thank you,
Meriwether County Board of Commissioners

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UGA Extension Meriwether County ANR E-Newsletter
July 18, 2016

WILDLIFE PROGRAM
For Harris, Meriwether, Muscogee and Troup Counties
PLANTING FOOD PLOTS FOR DEER: THE HOW, WHERE, WHY AND WHEN -- Presented by Dr. Mark McConnell, UGA Wildlife Outreach Specialist. Thursday, September 1st 6:30-8:00 PM
At Oakhurst Farm 19888 HWY 219 West Point, GA
For more information or to pre-register please contact:
Brian Maddy at 706-883-1675 or Susan James at 706-672-4235
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BACKYARD POULTRY FLOCK MANAGEMENT PROGRAM
The program is firming up. I will let you know when everything is finalized and we are ready for registration. I am still working on the egg candling class. The line-up, so far is:
Tuesday, October 4th from7:00-8:30 PM
Dr. Casey Ritz, UGA Poultry Science Department 
Basic Management, Breed Selection, and Disease Prevention
Tuesday, October 11th from7:00-8:30 PM
Dr. Brian Kiepper, UGA Poultry Science Department 
Meat Chicken Processing and Food Safety
Tuesday, October 18th from7:00-8:30 PM
Dr. Claudia Dunkley, UGA Poultry Science Department 
Bird Behavior, Housing and Management, Layer Production
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LIVESTOCK and FORAGES
Potential Hay Replacement Rations
UGA Beef Specialist, Lawton Stewart, spoke at the Cattlemen’s meeting last Tuesday on potential hay replacement rations for cattle. Here’s what he had to say:
What if hay is not available? The key is to develop a ration that meets the nutrient requirements of the cows. 
The stage of production of your herd is critical to knowing exactly what to feed. Table 1 lists some example rations to use for different stages of production.
Consider early weaning to reduce the nutrient requirements of the brood cows.
Utilize a roughage source such as wheat straw, cottonseed hulls, crop residue, grazing drought stressed crops, gin trash.
Examples of energy and/or byproduct feed include: grains such as corn, oats, etc., soybean hulls, citrus pulp, wheat middlings, hominy.
Examples of protein feed include: soybean meal, cottonseed meal, corn gluten feed, dried distillers grains, whole cottonseed
Is buying hay the economic choice?
ALWAYS, ALWAYS, ALWAYS ask for a forage analysis and/or test the hay before purchasing it. If not, you may be paying a premium for something that will not meet the requirements of your cows.
Take into consideration the cost of the supplement AND hay.
Also, take into consideration the method of feeding hay. If hay is not fed in a ring or other way to minimize lost, hay losses can be as high as 30%, or more.
Table 2 compares the cost of buying hay versus feeding a hay replacement diet
Note that if hay is being wasted, it is more economical to buy a replacement ration. This point is not necessarily to steer you towards the feed but to show the value of proper handling of purchased hay.

Another possible replacement ration is drought-stressed corn. For those of you who still have this crop in fields and want to use it as forage please watch this video produced by Dennis Hancock in 2011: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RdyfCfjhIws

If you want to use it as chopped forage pay attention to what Dennis says regarding potential dangerous nitrate concentrations. He recommends 12-15 inches of stubble height if cutting for green chop and a nitrate forage analysis which can be done for $13.00. Making silage from the corn will reduce nitrate levels too.
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From the Georgia State FSA July 2016 Newsletter:
Report Livestock Losses:
The Livestock Indemnity Program (LIP) provides assistance to eligible producers for livestock death losses in excess of normal mortality due to adverse weather events such as tornados floods, lightning, wildfires, extreme heat or extreme cold (ONLY if certain and specific criteria are met) as well as attacks by animals reintroduced into the wild by the federal government or protected by federal law. NOTE: Coyotes are NOT federally protected and losses caused by coyotes are NOT eligible for LIP. 
For 2016, eligible losses must occur on or after Jan. 1, 2016, and before December 31, 2016. A notice of loss must be filed with FSA within 30 days of when the loss occurs. Participants must provide supporting documentation to their local FSA office verifying the loss no later than 30 calendar days after the end of the calendar year for which benefits are requested.
IMPORTANT – Documentation provided by the producer must be verifiable and the types of documentation that meet the “verifiable requirements” are not usually available to livestock producers in Georgia. It is strongly suggested that producers incurring livestock losses contact their local FSA office immediately upon discovering livestock losses and arrange for the County Office to make a farm visit to verify the number of livestock lost and the cause of death. Otherwise the producer may not be able to provide the verifiable documentation required for LIP eligibility.
Producers who suffer livestock losses in 2016 must file both of the following:
A notice of loss the earlier of 30 calendar days of when the loss occurred
An application for payment by January 30, 2017.
Additional Information about LIP is available at your local FSA office (for Meriwether: 770-834-2097) or online at: www.fsa.usda.gov.

Livestock Forage Losses
LFP provides compensation to eligible livestock producers who suffer grazing losses for covered livestock due to drought on privately owned or cash leased land. 
ONLY Producers in the following 36 counties are eligible to apply for 2016 Livestock Forage Disaster Program (LFP) benefits on native pasture, improved pasture, and forage sorghum AT THIS TIME:
Banks, Bartow, Catoosa, Chattooga, Clayton, Cobb, Coweta, Dade, DeKalb, Douglas, Elbert, Fayette, Floyd, Franklin, Fulton, Gordon, Habersham, Hall, Hart, Heard, Henry, Jackson, Lamar, Madison, Meriwether, Newton, Paulding, Pike, Rabun, Rockdale, Spalding, Stephens, Walker and Whitfield.
NOTE: Eligibility is updated every Thursday and additional counties may become eligible in future weeks; please check with your local FSA county office to see if your county is eligible.
County Offices can only accept LFP applications after notification is received by the National Office if that they are in a county with a qualifying drought rating. IMPORTANT - County eligibility is based solely on the U.S. Drought Monitor Rating for Georgia and neither the FSA State Office nor County Offices have any input into the determination of LFP eligibility for a county.
Eligible livestock producers must complete a CCC-853 and the required supporting documentation no later than January 30, 2017 for 2016 losses. Producers with cash-leased land are required to provide written lease agreements from the land owner containing specific information on the rented land. In addition, grazing land for which benefits are requested under LFP are required to have been reported to the FSA office; if the land has not already been reported, a late-filed acreage report can be accepted but a “late-filing” fee will be assessed.
Additional Information about LFP, including eligible livestock is available at your local FSA office (for Meriwether: 770-834-2097) or online at: www.fsa.usda.gov
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2016 Annual Georgia Cattlemen’s Association Conference
July 29-30
The 6th annual GCA Summer Conference is being held at Callaway Gardens in Pine Mountain, GA. There will be committee meetings that are open to all GCA members and feature informative speakers to help guide GCA policies and activities. There will be plenty of family activities also including games at the beach, a sporting clay tournament, a corn hole tournament and a watermelon eating contest. Friday night’s dinner will be a Sam Gay Seafood Experience at the Lemmon Cattle Enterprises hosted by Harvey Lemmon and the Meriwether County Cattlemen’s Association. Saturday night’s dinner will be a combination of a grill out, games and a DJ at the Harris County Agri-center hosted by the Harris County Cattlemen’s Association.
To register please visit:
http://www.georgiacattlemen.org/summerconferenceregistratio…
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Deep South Stocker Conference 2016
August 4-5 in Carrollton, GA
The eighth annual Deep South Stocker Conference is headed to Georgia. This year’s program will offer a combination of seminars, demonstrations, as well as tours.
Seminars
· Beef Cattle Outlook: An overview of how the market has behaved over recent past and how the market looks for cattle production in the future.
· Stocker Marketing Options: An in-depth look at marketing options and risk management strategies for stocker operators/backgrounders.
· Veterinarian Feed Directive: An explanation of the rule and how it may affect your feeding program.
· Feedlot Feedback: How are Southeast cattle performing in the feedlot? What are the feedlot operators seeing? What are we doing right? What are we doing wrong?
Demonstrations
· Necropsy Demonstration: Understanding the impacts of respiratory disease and utilizing proper administration of pharmaceuticals.
· Understanding Animal Disease Chute-Side: Critical factors to decide if and when to treat, plus techniques to improve treatment response and reduce drug costs.
· What’s Going on in the Rumen: Understanding the interaction of rumen micro-organisms, the diet, and the impact on diet utilization.
· Maximizing Warm-Season Annual Forage Production: Where do they fit in, and how do we maximize the return on investment?
· Stockmanship and Stewardship:Live cattle handling demonstration of techniques to improve the safety and performance of cattle
The cost of this year’s conference is $100. This includes all of the seminars, demos, notebook, tour, lunch both days, and dinner. For more information on the program, registration, and location, please visit: http://www.deepsouthstocker.org/
This conference is a joint effort between the Alabama Cooperative Extension System, the Mississippi State University Extension Service, and the University of Georgia Cooperative Extension.
*Also, a request has gone out from the Carroll County Extension office for big barn fans to use in the arena during the conference. If you have any and would be willing to let them borrow them, please call Richard Littleton at 770-836-8546. *
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UGA Extension Northwest Georgia Master Cattleman Program
September 6-October 25 on Tuesday evenings from 6:30-8:30
Location: 21 Vulcan Materials Road LaGrange, GA 30240
This eight week program will include topics on forages, external parasites, facilities, diseases, reproduction, economics, animal selection, EPD’s, record keeping and more. Program participants that attend six of the eight sessions will receive a certificate of completion and UGA Master Cattleman Cap. Registration is $75 per person and includes a notebook of proceedings, refreshments each night and a steak dinner on the final night. Pre-Registration deadline is August 12, 2016. Checks can be made payable to Troup County Extension or you may call in (706.883.1675) and pay by credit card.
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TURF
2016 Turfgrass Research Field Day
Thursday, August 4th 8:00 AM-2:30 PM
Early Bird" registration has been extended to this Friday, July 22
This field day is designed for both beginners and veterans interested in turfgrass management, including those who work for golf courses; parks and recreation departments; school athletics and grounds maintenance; professional lawn care services; landscaping; garden centers; sod production; and institutional grounds maintenance. There will be instruction, research tours, exhibits and demonstrations. Lunch will be served to pre-registrants.
Topics for the Guided Research Tour in the morning:
· Latest Research on Turfgrass Weed Management
· Turfgrass Breeding – A Team Approach
· Tall Fescue in Georgia: Genetic Enhancements, Management and Pests
· Understanding Drought Tolerance for Breeding Warm-season Grasses
· Using Sensor Technology to Improve Fertility Practices
· Latest Research on Turfgrass Diseases with Emphasis on Lawn Care and Golf
· Diagnosing Common and Not So Common Problems in Turf
· Cultivar Development in Little Bluestem
· Pesticide Application, Pollinator Spaces and Plant Selection
For more information please visit:
http://www.commodities.caes.uga.edu/…/2016%20TGFD%20Brochur…
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LOCAL MARKET
Bill Nash has registered German shorthaired pointers (bird dogs) with working gun dog bloodlines for sale. Tails are docked and dew claws removed. They will be up to date with shots at 6 weeks. Contact Bill at 706-881-0031 or at greenacreskennel14@yahoo.com
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Hope you have a great week,
Susan

Susan C James
Agriculture and Natural Resources Agent
UGA Extension-Meriwether County
706-672-4235 Office

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Meriwether County Has Job Opening

for Recreation Coordinator

Meriwether County is currently looking to hire a Recreation Coordinator.

Here is the job posting notice:

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Cook beetle, azalea disease and more

UGA Extension Meriwether County ANR E-Newsletter
July 7, 2016

COOL INSECTS
EASTERN HERCULE BEETLES (Dynastes tityus)
I saw a female the other day at a farm but someone carried it off before I could get a picture. So I asked Vicki Bertagnolli, my good friend and fellow agent in SC, to send me pictures of the ones in her collection (she’s an excellent entomologist). The eggs and larvae of Eastern Hercules beetles are found in the rotting heartwood of hardwood logs and stumps. Mating may take place near the egg laying location and males may fight over these breeding sites. The males can be distinguished from the females by the horns; one projecting from the head and one from the pronotum of the thorax. Yes, they use these horns for defensive purposes. The adults feed on the sap of trees but are also attracted to a wide variety of overripe or rotting fruits. These are the largest beetles in the southeastern US, typically 2-2.5 inches long. In the image above, you can see where Vicki spread out the two sets of wings. The front pair of wings, called the elytra, are hard and serve as protective cover. The rear wings are membranous and are used for flight. To learn more about these cool beetles please visit: http://www.uky.edu/…/casefile/insects/beetles/hercules/herc…
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PEST OF THE WEEK
No, the azalea in the accompanying image is not a variegated form. It is suffering from and showing the symptoms of damage by azalea lace bugs (Stephanitis pyrioides).
Azalea lace bugs feed on the underside of leaves but the stippling effect of their feeding is seen on the upper surface. They will suck the fluids, including the green chlorophyll, from the leaf cells. In severe cases the leaves will look almost totally white. On the underside will be brown spots of excrement and cast exoskeletons as well as eggs, immatures and adult lace bugs. There can be multiple generations so damage can continue throughout the spring and summer. Drought stressed shrubs and ones that get more sun are more likely to be attacked. For light infestations natural predators and parasitoids will keep the problem in check. For heavier infestations a chemical insecticide may be necessary to stop further damage. That was my recommendation with this severe case. Possibly, if the problem had been caught earlier, softer insecticides like insecticidal soap or horticultural oil would have been adequate for control. This case justified using one of the systemic insecticides listed in the 2016 Georgia Pest Management Handbook for Homeowners on page 115:
http://www.ent.uga.edu/…/GA-Pest-Management-2016-Home-ORNAM…
For more information on lace bugs please visit:
http://extension.uga.edu/publications/files/…/B%201102_3.PDF
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BACKYARD POULTRY FLOCK MANAGEMENT CLASSES
I am in the process of organizing classes for backyard poultry flock owners for October and need your help. What topics do you need to have addressed? Do you already have a flock or are you just thinking about getting chickens? Do you have poultry for eggs or for meat? What other poultry do you have besides chickens? How many of you are interested and/or know of others in the area who would be interested? Participants may come from other counties; the classes will not be limited to Meriwether County residents.
The more folks I know who will attend, the more classes I can offer. Most of the experts teaching the classes will be from the Poultry Science Department at UGA, Athens Campus, so they have a bit of a drive to get here. The classes will take place on Tuesday evenings from 6:30-8:30.
Topics that have been taught for other counties are: basics of flock management; layers and their behaviors; disease and disease management; meat chicken processing and food safety with a hands-on component. If needed, I can have someone from the Georgia Department of Agriculture do a candling class.
You can email me or phone me if you have answers to the above questions. My contact information is at the bottom of this e-newsletter. Please let me hear from you so I can finalize arrangements!
ALSO LOOKING AHEAD FOR THE FALL
I’m in the process of organizing other programs for the fall including small ruminant meetings (updates to this past spring program), a deer food plot meeting and possibly a food plot demo, strawberry and vegetable grower meetings so be sure to keep a watch out in future issues. You can also email me if you are interested in a specific meeting so I can put you on the mail list for it. If there is other programming that I need to bring to the county please let me know that also!
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FARM SERVICE AGENCY
Highlights from the June issue Georgia State FSA Newsletter:
USDA Offers New Loans for Portable Farm Storage and Handling Equipment:
USDA’s Farm Service Agency (FSA) will provide a new financing option to help farmers purchase portable storage and handling equipment. The loans, which now include a smaller microloan option with lower down payments, are designed to help producers, including new, small, and mid-sized producers, grow their businesses and markets.
Attention Georgia NAP Participants
Effective for the 2017 crop year, the application closing dates for the following crops have been amended to agree with current RMA policies:
7/1/2016 for Cabbage, Turnip Greens, Kale, Broccoli, Brussel Sprouts, and Collards
7/31/2016 for Sweet Corn
USDA Expands Safety-Net for Dairy Operations Adding Next-Generation Family Members
Dairy farms participating in the Margin Protection Program (MPP) can now update their production history when an eligible family member joins the operation. The voluntary program, established by the 2014 Farm Bill, protects participating dairy producers when the margin – the difference between the price of milk and feed costs – falls below levels of protection selected by the applicant.
To read the complete newsletter visit: http://www.fsa.usda.gov/Internet/FSA_File/1300020161306.pdf
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EQUINE
The Georgia Department of Agriculture will hold a live auction of impounded horses on August 10, starting at 10 AM, at the Mansfield Impound Barn at 2834 Marben Farm Road in Mansfield, GA.
For more information on the horses and the auction please visit:
http://agr.georgia.gov/dept-sets-equine-auction-for-aug-10.…
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LIVESTOCK
Meriwether County Cattlemen’s Meeting
Our next meeting is Tuesday, July 12th at 7:30 PM. Dr. Lawton Stewart, Professor in the UGA School of Animal and Dairy Science will be speaking. The topic of his talk will be “Drought Management for Beef Cows.” Also speaking and sponsoring the meeting is Daryl Graves of Country Financial. As usual we will meet at Tant’s Café in Manchester.
2016 Annual Georgia Cattlemen’s Association Conference
July 29-30
The 6th annual GCA Summer Conference is being held at Callaway Gardens in Pine Mountain, GA. There will be committee meetings that are open to all GCA members and feature informative speakers to help guide GCA policies and activities. There will be plenty of family activities also including games at the beach, a sporting clay tournament, a corn hole tournament and a watermelon eating contest. Friday night’s dinner will be a Sam Gay Seafood Experience at the Lemmon Cattle Enterprises hosted by Harvey Lemmon and the Meriwether County Cattlemen’s Association. Saturday night’s dinner will be a combination of a grill out, games and a DJ at the Harris County Agri-center hosted by the Harris County Cattlemen’s Association.
To register please visit:
http://www.georgiacattlemen.org/summerconferenceregistratio…
Deep South Stocker Conference 2016
August 4-5 in Carrollton, GA
The eighth annual Deep South Stocker Conference is headed to Georgia. This year’s program will offer a combination of seminars, demonstrations, as well as tours. The cost of this year’s conference is $100. This includes all of the seminars, demos, notebook, tour, lunch both days, and dinner. For more information on the program, registration, and location, please visit: http://www.deepsouthstocker.org/
This conference is a joint effort between the Alabama Cooperative Extension System, the Mississippi State University Extension Service, and the University of Georgia Cooperative Extension.
UGA Extension Northwest Georgia Master Cattleman Program
Sept. 6-Oct. 25 on Tuesday evenings from 6:30-8:30
Location: 21 Vulcan Materials Road LaGrange, GA 30240
This eight week program will include topics on forages, external parasites, facilities, diseases, reproduction, economics, animal selection, EPD’s, record keeping and more. Program participants that attend six of the eight sessions will receive a certificate of completion and UGA Master Cattleman Cap. Registration is $75 per person and includes a notebook of proceedings, refreshments each night and a steak dinner on the final night. Pre-Registration deadline is August 12, 2016. Checks can be made payable to Troup County Extension or you may call in (706.883.1675) and pay by credit card.
Below is a schedule of the classes:
Sept. 6 - Jason Duggin, Welcome; Dr. Dennis Hancock, Forages; Dr. Lawton Stewart and Dr. Jacob Segers, Nutrition
Sept. 13 - Dr. Nancy Hinkle, External Parasites; Dr. John Worley,Facilities
Sept. 20 - Dr. Lawton Stewart and Dr. Jacob Segers, Nutrition.
Sept. 27 - Dr. Brent Credille, Diseases / Agro-terrorism
Oct. 4 - Dr. Lee Jones, Reproduction
Oct. 11 - Dr. John McKissick, Economics
Oct. 18 - Selection, Animal Selection Basics; Dr. Ronnie Silcox, EPD’s and Record Keeping
Oct. 25 - Jason Duggin or Carole Knight, Meats and Beef Quality Assurance; Will Bentley, Georgia Cattlemen’s Association
TURF
2016 Turfgrass Research Field Day
Thursday, August 4 8:00 AM-2:30 PM
This field day is designed for both beginners and veterans interested in turfgrass management, including those who work for golf courses; parks and recreation departments; school athletics and grounds maintenance; professional lawn care services; landscaping; garden centers; sod production; and institutional grounds maintenance. There will be instruction, research tours, exhibits and demonstrations. Lunch will be served to pre-registrants. For more information please visit:
http://www.commodities.caes.uga.edu/…/2016%20TGFD%20Brochur…
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I hope you have a great weekend. I will be enjoying the sun and surf back in SC and be back in Georgia next Tuesday.
Susan
Susan C James
Agriculture and Natural Resources Agent
UGA Extension-Meriwether County
scj24262@uga.edu
706-672-4235 Office

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Help needed with Backpacks 4 Kids project

The local District Attorney’s Office is spearheading a program called Backpacks 4 Kids. This program seeks to provide elementary schools throughout the Coweta Circuit, with backpacks full of basic school supplies. Those elementary schools can then distribute those backpacks to students who are unable to afford basic supplies.

The Circuit's motto is “Always Seek Justice.” Part of seeking justice is assisting those who are in need, both inside and outside the courtroom. "We are hoping that, with your help, we can seek justice in our community by assisting those children who are in most need of our help in our community," said organizers.

When the school year approaches, many families in Meriwether County are faced with a difficult choice: provide basic goods or provide basic school supplies. That is an unacceptable choice.

They would appreciate any donations or school supplies. For information contact Drew Case or Brett Adams, Assistant District Attorneys, Office of the District Attorney, Peter J. Skandalakis, Coweta Judicial Circuit, Troup County, 100 Ridley Ave., LaGrange, GA 30240 or call 706-298-3708. The Circuit's website is dacowetacircuit.org .

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Recent local business news:

Come out Saturday, July 16 and celebrate the grand re-opening of the historic Hill Brothers Store, now to be known as Hill Brothers Corner, in Greenville, GA

Linda and Rod Wilburn have invested significant “blood, sweat and tears,” not to mention funds, to restore this building which will now be available for rental (loft apartments and retail space). Design work was done by Shelly and Mike Testa of Mike Testa design. This is a significant project for the downtown Greenville area. Event is 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. and will feature entertainment; food and great history.

Briefs:

  • The Trammell House bed and breakfast in Luthersville has a new website: http://thetrammellhouse.weebly.com/   The ancestral home at 10 Park Street in Luthersville has been restored and furnished in the style of the 1840s with some modern amenities that do not blemish the nostalgic feel of the warm, original hand-planed boards, beams, wavy-paned windows, original chimneys and fireplaces.
  • Congratulations goes to Bulloch House, the long-time Warm Springs restaurant, which has been featured in the new Georgia Eats Culinary Guide! 

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Winners announced in 'No Junk Food' challenge

Winners in the Meriwether County employees "No Junk Food" challenge were announced Wednesday, June 29, by Bill Gregory, Director of Finance & Purchasing.

"I am happy to announce the winners of the 4-Week No Junk Food challenge that recently wrapped up on June the 16th," Gregory said. "First Place winner is Marchella Reeves who accomplished a perfect score of 196. I think everyone should congratulate her on a job well done. She will be receiving a $ 25.00 gift card.

"Also receiving $25.00 gift cards from a random drawing of all the participants by Chairman Hadley at last night’s Board of Commissioners meeting are the following: Shawander Gates, Dovie Garner and Judy Weldon.

"Thanks to all of us that participated and the Wellness Committee who works hard to make our Wellness Program work. We are currently working on plans for a fall contest. If you have any suggestions or comments, please share them with myself, Michelle or one of the Wellness Committee members.
 
Thanks again and keep up the good work."

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Join the 2016 Camp Dream Celebration!

The 2016 Camp Dream Kickoff Celebration will be held Sunday, July 17 from 10 a.m. to noon at Roosevelt Institute for Rehabilitation, 6135 Roosevelt Highway in Warm Springs.

Join the Annual Camp Dream Kickoff Celebration at the camp facilities in Warm Springs, GA. The organization is excited to be celebrating its 21st year of offering summer camps for children and young adults with disabilities.

This event is open to the public, everyone is invited to visit the camp during this July session.

Enjoy hot dogs/ hamburgers and a scoop of ice cream while socializing with the Camp Dream Team and local community members. Don't miss this exciting opportunity to see how they are making disabilities.. disappear at Camp Dream!

Go to www.CampDreamGA.org for all the details on this camp.

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UGA Extension Meriwether County ANR E-Newsletter
June 24, 2016
 
PESTS OF THE WEEK
 
Blossom-end rot and pythium are the problems of the week. Blossom-end rot is a physiological disorder influenced by the environment and cultural practices. Pythium is a pathogen but environment and cultural practices are critical to its ability to become infectious. With both of these problems managing watering correctly should help eliminate the problems.
 
Blossom-end rot occurs because of an inability of the plant to get enough calcium to the forming fruit. If a grower has corrected the soil pH there should be adequate available calcium for a crop. When blossom-end rot occurs and enough calcium is available, it is necessary to determine why the plant is unable to access it. In most cases the issue is with the watering/irrigation technique. For growing crops about 50% of soil should consist of pore space. The other 50% is made of inorganic solids (minerals) and organic matter. For healthy plant growth the pore space should be about equally filled with air and water (field capacity). If the pore space is completely filled with water then the soil is at saturation point. Saturated soils are not good for most plants. Saturation will occur most easily in clay or compacted soils that drain poorly. Roots in saturated soils are unable to move water and dissolved essential elements, including calcium, up through the xylem and into the above ground plant tissues. If there is not enough water in the pore space, the same thing happens-no movement of water and essential elements throughout the plant tissues.
Growers need to be aware of how well, or not, their soils drain to determine how much to water. Using plasticulture can make this difficult unless you make the effort to discover what’s happening under the plastic. Sometimes visual aids aren’t enough, especially to know what moisture is available 8 inches below the surface. A general rule of thumb is 1-1 ½ inches of water per week is needed by plants. More is needed in really hot weather and during specific stages of plant growth such as fruiting. But if your soil is clay and all of that is applied at one time then your soil may become saturated. If your soil is very sandy the water may leach right away and then your soil is dry for the rest of the week. So it is better to break up the total amount of water into multiple applications. Growers in sandier soils will need to make more applications with less water to keep from losing it to leaching. Clay soils will hold the moisture longer so fewer applications should work. There are soil moisture meters and sensors that can remove the guess work if determining the correct amount proves difficult. Keeping the soil consistently moist without too much “free water” is what you are striving for.
Other factors that may contribute to blossom-end rot when calcium is adequate is fruit load, rapid vegetative growth, extreme temperatures (air and soil), cultivation that damages roots, excessive fertilizer salts and crop variety. Numerous crops will have blossom-end rot including tomatoes, bell peppers, eggplant, squash and melons. Fruit crops with blossom-end rot will develop a dark, discolored area at the end of the fruit furthest from the stem (see image below). It may become sunken and water soaked. Other crops can have a calcium deficiency but the symptoms will be different.

Pythium species are oomycetes, also known as water molds. They were once classified as fungi but they have major differences, one being that their cells are made up of mostly cellulose. Fungi are made of chitin. Pathogenic pythium species are more likely to develop in wet soils so managing irrigation is crucial to prevent disease from becoming active. Infection can occur when the soil is saturated for as little as 5 to 6 hours. Plants that have compromised/damaged roots from too much water will have the same symptoms of plants exposed to a drought situation; they wilt. In both cases not enough water is moving through the roots to be pulled, through evapotranspiration, into the rest of the plant. Damping off and root rot is most likely to happen to seedlings and young transplants, so be careful of how you water early on in the growing season as well as later. Some problems may start at that time and just get worse as the season progresses. Be careful not to wound plants as you put them in the ground, also. Wounds on plants are easy access points for pathogens. A simple diagnostic test for pythium is to see if you can easily scrape off the outer cortical cells of a root from a wilted plant while the root stele (inner tissue) stays intact. You can see where I did this to a root in the image below. If most of the smaller roots are this damaged on a plant and the plant is severely wilting, remove the plant with as many intact roots as possible and destroy it or bag it and throw it away.
* * *
 
LOCALLY GROWN
 
Fresh fruits and vegetables are pouring in-don’t miss this opportunity to enjoy a wide variety!
 
Blueberries are available from Blue Star Berry Farm
Contact Tamara at 706-975-5770 or Joan at 706-601-2640
 
Carroll Farms’ new shed on Carroll Chunn Road outside of Woodbury is now open. They are also selling their peaches, peach salsa, tomatoes, jams and jellies at their stand at the traffic light in Woodbury. 
 
Fresh sweet corn is in! A couple of Meriwether County growers near Pine Mountain sell their produce at the Chipley Community Co-op at 205 N. King street in Pine Mountain, including Terry and Mike at Strickland Brothers Farm and Jerry Armstrong. Terry has yellow, cannonball and patty pan squash, peppers (bell, jalapeno and habanero) and onions as well as the corn for sale. The hours for the co-op are Tuesday and Thursday: 9-1; Friday: 4-6 and Saturday 8-1. You can also contact Terry at 706-881-2414 to pick up produce at the farm.
 
Peaches, nectarines, cucumbers, various squash, black and white eggplant, okra, onions and various beans including rattlesnake, purple and Blue Lake are available at Fitzgerald Fruit Farms on Imlac Road outside of Woodbury. You can contact them at 706-553-2795 or visit www.fitzgeraldfruitfarms.com
 
Hudson Farms has two locations to visit. The store at the traffic light in Woodbury is open Monday-Saturday: 9-5 and on Sundays: 10-5. The store on Raleigh Road is open Wednesday-Sunday: 9-5. They have peaches, plums and blueberries for sale.
 
Connie and David Strickland and their daughter, Jennifer Phillips of WJM Farms raise Katahdin and Dorper sheep. They have lambs of both breeds for sale. You can contact David at 770-550-1324.
* * *
 
LOCAL REQUEST
 
If anyone is interested in renovating an old vineyard of muscadines near Harris City please call Ed Withrow of West Fraser at 706-655-3889. The vineyard is approximately 1 acre in size.

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FORAGES
 
For information on all topics forage related please visit the UGA CAES Forage website: http://www.caes.uga.edu/commodities/fieldcrops/forages/
 
Forages for Horses (excerpt from the Forage Team Newsletter June 2016)
Bermudagrass as Equine Forage

By Lucy Ray, Morgan County ANR Agent
 
Chances are if you have spent much time around horse people, at some point you have heard “I can’t feed bermudagrass hay. My horses will colic on it”. This myth, which is more prevalent in urban areas where the population is farther removed from agriculture, has been around for at least two decades. In some cases, horse owners refuse to plant bermudagrass in their pastures out of fear that this species of grass will cause colic in horses in either a fresh or cured state. However, this myth is not entirely accurate. Bermudagrass is an excellent forage choice for Georgia. It is heat tolerant, drought tolerant, and responds well to fertilization. When properly managed, bermudagrass has a high digestibility and handles overgrazing and treading fairly well.
So why the bad reputation? Horses need to consume approximately two percent of their body weight daily. At least one percent of their body weight needs to be in some type of forage. This is important because the fiber is necessary to maintain the integrity and fill of the horse’s gastrointestinal tract. Because horses are hind gut fermenters, rather than foregut fermenters like cattle, they are more prone to digestive upsets such as colic. Impaction colic, where feedstuffs become impacted in a portion of the large intestine, are commonly blamed on whatever the horse had been eating prior to becoming sick. Fine stemmed forages have a bad reputation based on the thought that they are more easily impacted in the animal’s gut. Several varieties of bermudagrass, such as Russell and Alicia are known for being fine stemmed. In addition, since the majority of horses in the Southeast are fed bermudagrass at some point via pasture or hay, the majority of horses that are admitted to a veterinary hospital for surgery have bermudagrass in their digestive tract.
Forage quality is important when considering hay for horses. Quality is most easily measured by RFQ (Relative Forage Quality) as this number takes into account both the total digestible nutrients (TDN) and dry matter intake (DMI). RFQ is able to compare forage quality across forage species. In essence, it provides a tool to compare Bermuda to alfalfa on the same scale. An RFQ of 100-120 is sufficient for an idle horse or one in light work. Bermudagrass is capable of meeting these qualifications. Research has shown that there is a correlation between high NDF values in hay and colic in horses. NDF, or neutral detergent fiber, is the indigestible portion of forage. This factor is more likely that this is the source of digestive upset, rather than a specific forage species. Thus, the take home message is that higher quality forages are better for your horse not only because they provide better nutrition, but are important in maintaining the health of their digestive tract as well.
When feeding horses of any species, it is important to remember that hay should be free of mold, weeds, and foreign objects. Dry, dusty or moldy hay can also cause a respiratory condition called heaves. Any type of species of forage can make acceptable hay for horses, provided it is harvested at the proper stage of maturity and put up correctly. There is always a danger that impactions can occur when horses become dehydrated, thus access to fresh, clean water is important. Tifton 85, Russell, Alicia, Coastal, and Tifton 44 are all excellent varieties of Bermudagrass for both pasture or hay production in Georgia. Tifton 85 is naturally coarser stemmed than the other varieties. Regardless of forage species, it is more important to have forage tested than to buy simply on variety or age.
* * *
 
TURF
 
2016 Turfgrass Research Field Day
Thursday, August 4 8:00 AM-2:30 PM

This field day is designed for both beginners and veterans interested in turfgrass management, including those who work for golf courses; parks and recreation departments; school athletics and grounds maintenance; professional lawn care services; landscaping; garden centers; sod production; and institutional grounds maintenance. There will be instruction, research tours, exhibits and demonstrations. Lunch will be served to pre-registrants. For more information please visit:
 
http://www.commodities.caes.uga.edu/turfgrass/georgiaturf/FieldDay/2016%20TGFD%20Brochure.pdf
* * *
 
LIVESTOCK
 
Fire Ant Field Day
Tuesday, July 12: 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm

Yates Farm located at 2939 Old Columbus Road in Roopville
Cost:  $5 per person
Recertification Credits:  Category 21 & 22 - 1 credit
                          Private Applicator License – 1 credit
 
Attendees will learn about fire ant biology, how to control fire ants, and learn how to use the Herd spreader available for Carroll County farmers to use to spread fire ant bait.  Hot dogs and drink will be served.
For Livestock producers, including beef, horse, sheep and goat, managing their pastures
Presenters:                   Henry D. Dorough, CCA, PAS
                                    Regional Extension Agent, Animal Science & Forages
                                    Alabama Cooperative Extension System
 
                                    Paula J. Burke
                                    Agricultural & Natural Resources Agent
                                    UGA Extension Carroll County
 
To Pre-Register:            Call 770-836-8546 or email pjburke@uga.edu
                                    Please pre-register by July 8
Sponsored by: UGA Extension Carroll County and Southern Home and Ranch Center
 
 
2016 Annual Georgia Cattlemen’s Association Conference
July 29-30

The 6th annual GCA Summer Conference is being held at Callaway Gardens in Pine Mountain, GA. There will be committee meetings that are open to all GCA members and feature informative speakers to help guide GCA policies and activities. There will be plenty of family activities also including games at the beach, a sporting clay tournament, a corn hole tournament and a watermelon eating contest. Friday night’s dinner will be a Sam Gay Seafood Experience at the Lemmon Cattle Enterprises hosted by Harvey Lemmon and the Meriwether County Cattlemen’s Association. Saturday night’s dinner will be a combination of a grill out, games and a DJ at the Harris County Agri-center hosted by the Harris County Cattlemen’s Association.
To register please visit:
http://www.georgiacattlemen.org/summerconferenceregistration.aspx
 
Deep South Stocker Conference 2016
August 4-5 in Carrollton, GA

The eighth annual Deep South Stocker Conference is headed to Georgia. This year’s program will offer a combination of seminars, demonstrations, as well as tours. The cost of this year’s conference is $100. This includes all of the seminars, demos, notebook, tour, lunch both days, and dinner. For more information on the program, registration, and location, please visit: http://www.deepsouthstocker.org/
This conference is a joint effort between the Alabama Cooperative Extension System, the Mississippi State University Extension Service, and the University of Georgia Cooperative Extension.
 
UGA Extension Northwest Georgia Master Cattleman Program
Sept. 6-Oct. 25 on Tuesday evenings from 6:30-8:30

Location:  21 Vulcan Materials Road LaGrange, GA 30240
This eight week program will include topics on forages, external parasites, facilities, diseases, reproduction, economics, animal selection, EPD’s, record keeping and more. Program participants that attend six of the eight sessions will receive a certificate of completion and UGA Master Cattleman Cap. Registration is $75 per person and includes a notebook of proceedings, refreshments each night and a steak dinner on the final night. Pre-Registration deadline is August 12, 2016. Checks can be made payable to Troup County Extension or you may call in (706.883.1675) and pay by credit card.

Below is a schedule of the classes:

Sept. 6 -  Jason Duggin, Welcome; Dr. Dennis Hancock, Forages; Dr. Lawton Stewart and Dr. Jacob Segers, Nutrition
Sept. 13 - Dr. Nancy Hinkle, External Parasites; Dr. John Worley,Facilities
Sept. 20 - Dr. Lawton Stewart and Dr. Jacob Segers, Nutrition.
Sept. 27 - Dr. Brent Credille, Diseases / Agro-terrorism
Oct. 4 - Dr. Lee Jones, Reproduction
Oct. 11 - Dr. John McKissick, Economics
Oct. 18 - Selection, Animal Selection Basics; Dr. Ronnie Silcox, EPD’s and Record Keeping
Oct. 25 - Jason Duggin or Carole Knight, Meats and Beef Quality Assurance; Will Bentley, Georgia Cattlemen’s Association
  
PESTICDE WASTE DISPOSAL CLEAN DAY
 
The Georgia Department of Agriculture has selected a date and site for the next Pesticide Waste Disposal Clean Day event. The event will be held at the Southern Pines Ag Expo in Dublin, GA, June 29, 2016 from 9:00-3:00. Pre-registration is required due to limited funding and will be suspended once we reach 40,000 lbs.

  • The event is open to licensed private, commercial applicators, farmers, golf and turf industry, pest control companies, commercial contractors, and state agencies.
  • Special arrangements have been made for Chemical Dealers. MXI Environmental Services has agreed to accept additional pesticide waste from dealers. MXI will have the capability to weigh on site and bill dealers at a rate of $1.10 per pound.

Pre-registration will be awarded as received, with a cutoff date of June 24th.
All pre-registration forms need to be returned back to Rick Hayes at ricky.hayes@agr.georgia.gov, Fax: (404) 657-8378, so I can closely monitor the amount of materials for cutoffs. 
For more information please visit: http://agr.georgia.gov/georgia-clean-day.aspx
 
I hope everyone has a great weekend!
Susan

Susan C James
Agriculture and Natural Resources Agent
UGA Extension-Meriwether County
706-672-4235 Office

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Town Hall Meeting on Lake Meriwether June 23

A Town Hall Meeting on planned improvements at Lake Meriwether is Thursday, June 23, 2016 at Woodbury City Hall at 6:30 p.m., hosted by Meriwether County Board of Commissioners and Meriwether County Chamber of Commerce & Tourism.

An overview of plans for Lake Meriwether will be presented. Share your thoughts. Ask Questions.Enjoy Refreshments.

Questions, call 706-655-2558 or contact Carolyn McLinley of the Meriwether Chamber of Commerce.

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UGA Extension Meriwether County ANR E-Newsletter
June 17, 2016
 
PESTS OF THE WEEK
 
Bacterial Wilt of Tomatoes
Bacterial wilt was found in tomato fields this week. Typically, plants will wilt over a few days but the plants remain green. It is most likely to occur when air temperatures are above 85°F. The disease is caused by the soil borne bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum. Once a plant is infected there is no treatment. Commercial producers can fumigate the soil before the next planting. Otherwise, it is recommended that solanaceous crops be rotated to a different area for at least three years. The new planting area should be uphill from the infested area as the bacteria can move with water movement through the soil. For growers using pond water for irrigation, the bacteria may be in the pond and be a source of reinfesting the soil. All infected plants should be removed as soon as discovered because they serve as a source for increasing inoculum in the soil. Try to dig up as many of the roots intact as possible. Home gardeners may want to try planting their tomatoes in large pots.
 
There is a simple diagnostic method to determine if plants have bacterial wilt. Cut out a 3-4 inch piece of the stem near the base of the plant and suspend it in a clear glass container of water. Rinse the stem first if necessary. I use a knife to pierce the stem then balance the knife across the top of the container to hold the stem suspended in the water. Within a few minutes you should be able to see a white stream of bacteria oozing out of the cut end. Hopefully, you can see the bacteria streaming in the image below. You can also see the bacteria streaming by placing a thin slice of stem tissue on a slide mount under a compound microscope.
 
For more information and to see images please visit:
http://plantpath.caes.uga.edu/extension/plants/vegetables/TomatoSouthernBacterialWilt.html
http://www.clemson.edu/public/regulatory/plant_industry/pest_nursery_programs/plant_prob_clinic/fact_sheet_folder/bac_wilt_tomato.html
 
Coccidiosis in Small Ruminants
Coccidiosis in animals is caused by parasitic single-cell protozoa. In small ruminants, species of Eimeria cause the disease. The species that cause the disease in sheep are not the same that infect goats. There is variation in the level of pathogenicity in the different species also. Almost all sheep and goats are exposed to coccidia through contaminated feed, water, soil, licking themselves or other animals. Lambs and kids are the most susceptible to the disease especially during the stressful period of weaning. Symptoms of infection are diarrhea, loss of appetite, dehydration, fever, weight loss and death. Mature animals are largely immune to the effects of the parasite, but they contribute to the cycle of infection. Coccidia multiply in the lining of the small intestine. Oocysts are passed in the feces into the environment. They sporulate and are then ingested by the animals completing the cycle of infection. Once animals are infected it is difficult to treat the disease so preventative measures are critical.
 
Dr. Michael Neary, Extension Small Ruminant Specialist at Purdue University recommends the following preventative measures:

  • Sanitation is the first line of defense-keep barns clean, prevent contamination of feed by keeping it off the ground, make sure water is clean
  • Keep bedding clean and dry
  • Avoid crowding and over-populating pastures
  • Use coccidiostats-feed to ewes and does during late gestation to lower contamination and to lambs and kids at least 21 days prior to weaning
  •  Consult a veterinarian for treatment of the disease

 
For more information on Coccidiosis please visit:
http://www.ansc.purdue.edu/SP/MG/Documents/SLIDES/Coccidiosis.pdf
http://www.sheepandgoat.com/#!coccidiosis/c1yuz
 
For information on Coccidiosis and other parasites of sheep please visit:
http://athenaeum.libs.uga.edu/bitstream/handle/10724/11994/B1064.htm?sequence=3
* * *

LIVESTOCK
 
Scrapie Free Flock Certification Program for Sheep and Goats Update
To view the new standards please visit:
https://www.aphis.usda.gov/animal_health/animal_diseases/scrapie/downloads/standards_current.pdf
 
Fire Ant Field Day
Tuesday, July 12: 6-8 p.m.
Yates Farm located at 2939 Old Columbus Road in Roopville
Cost:  $5 per person
Recertification Credits: Category 21 & 22 - 1 credit
                                  Private Applicator License – 1 credit
 Attendees will learn about fire ant biology, how to control fire ants, and learn how to use the Herd spreader available for Carroll County farmers to use to spread fire ant bait.  Hot dogs and drink will be served.
For Livestock producers, including beef, horse, sheep and goat, managing their pastures
Presenters: Henry D. Dorough, CCA, PAS
                  Regional Extension Agent, Animal Science & Forages
                  Alabama Cooperative Extension System
 
                   Paula J. Burke
                   Agricultural & Natural Resources Agent
                   UGA Extension Carroll County
 
To Pre-Register: Call 770-836-8546 or email pjburke@uga.edu
                         Please pre-register by July 8
Sponsored by: UGA Extension Carroll County and Southern Home and Ranch Center
 
 
2016 Annual Georgia Cattlemen’s Association Conference
July 29-30
The 6th annual GCA Summer Conference is being held at Callaway Gardens in Pine Mountain, GA. There will be committee meetings that are open to all GCA members and feature informative speakers to help guide GCA policies and activities. There will be plenty of family activities also including games at the beach, a sporting clay tournament, a corn hole tournament and a watermelon eating contest. Friday night’s dinner will be a Sam Gay Seafood Experience at the Lemmon Cattle Enterprises hosted by Harvey Lemmon and the Meriwether County Cattlemen’s Association. Saturday night’s dinner will be a combination of a grill out, games and a DJ at the Harris County Agri-center hosted by the Harris County Cattlemen’s Association.
To register please visit:
http://www.georgiacattlemen.org/summerconferenceregistration.aspx
 
 
Deep South Stocker Conference 2016
August 4-5 in Carrollton, GA
The eighth annual Deep South Stocker Conference is headed to Georgia. This year’s program will offer a combination of seminars, demonstrations, as well as tours. The cost of this year’s conference is $100. This includes all of the seminars, demos, notebook, tour, lunch both days, and dinner. For more information on the program, registration, and location, please visit: http://www.deepsouthstocker.org/
This conference is a joint effort between the Alabama Cooperative Extension System, the Mississippi State University Extension Service, and the University of Georgia Cooperative Extension.
 
UGA Extension Northwest Georgia Master Cattleman Program
September 6-October 25 on Tuesday evenings from 6:30-8:30
Location:  21 Vulcan Materials Road LaGrange, GA 30240
This eight week program will include topics on forages, external parasites, facilities, diseases, reproduction, economics, animal selection, EPD’s, record keeping and more. Program participants that attend six of the eight sessions will receive a certificate of completion and UGA Master Cattleman Cap. Registration is $75 per person and includes a notebook of proceedings, refreshments each night and a steak dinner on the final night. Pre-Registration deadline is August 12, 2016. Checks can be made payable to Troup County Extension or you may call in (706.883.1675) and pay by credit card.
Below is a schedule of the classes:
Sept. 6 -  Jason Duggin, Welcome; Dr. Dennis Hancock, Forages; Dr. Lawton Stewart and Dr. Jacob Segers, Nutrition
Sept. 13 - Dr. Nancy Hinkle, External Parasites; Dr. John Worley,Facilities
Sept. 20 - Dr. Lawton Stewart and Dr. Jacob Segers, Nutrition.
Sept. 27 - Dr. Brent Credille, Diseases / Agro-terrorism
Oct. 4 - Dr. Lee Jones, Reproduction
Oct. 11 - Dr. John McKissick, Economics
Oct. 18 - Selection, Animal Selection Basics; Dr. Ronnie Silcox, EPD’s and Record Keeping
Oct. 25 - Jason Duggin or Carole Knight, Meats and Beef Quality Assurance; Will Bentley, Georgia Cattlemen’s Association
 
FORAGES
AFGC October/November 2016 New Zealand Ag Tour!
The American Forage and Grassland Council is pleased to host a 2016 Ag Tour to New Zealand.  When we go on this tour in October and November, you are NEVER going to be the same again. This trip will forever change the way you view forage-based agriculture. You will also be inspired by the passion for pastoral farming systems that you see here in NZ. In the coming days, I plan to write a summary of the trip. But, suffice it to say now, YOU WILL NOT WANT TO MISS THIS TOUR!
The goals for setting up this tour have been to 1) highlight the diversity of New Zealand's pastoral agriculture, 2) help you develop networks with farmers and experts in New Zealand, and 3) experience the sites and beauty of this country. We plan to announce a tentative itinerary by the end of April with a cost estimate to follow shortly. But, until then, just know that you will want to do everything you can to come along on this journey. 
To view the tentative agenda, click here. Space is limited to 30 participants so reserve your spot today! This tour will offer something for everyone, and we're hoping you'll make it a family trip.
The registration fee for the tour will be $2800 for members and $2850 for non-members for 10 days and $4100 for members and $4150 for non-members for 14 days.  The 14-Day tour will include transportation and lodging for the New Zealand Grassland Association Annual Conference.  
The fees noted do not include airfare, New Zealand Grassland Association conference registration fee, or other items not included in the event itinerary.  The registration fee includes ground transportation, lodging, some meals (as noted on itinerary), tour stops, tour speakers, and tour guides.  There is a non-refundable deposit of $1000 due by September 1, 2016 with full payment due by September 15, 2016.
When you reserve your spot a confirmation email will be sent to you regarding how to make your airline arrangements.
What is Covered by the Tour Fee?
The fee will cover most of your in-country expenses [hotel rooms; most meals; transportation in country; admission to attractions, shows, or other special events that are part of the tour; other direct costs associated with the events; and NZ Goods and Services Tax (sales tax)]. Plus, we have thrown in some of the most incredible pastoral scenery in the world for FREE!
If you haven't traveled outside of the U.S. before, don't worry! Traveling to NZ is easy and very safe. Plus, we'll help you prepare for the journey. We will have an orientation meeting via a tele-/web-conference to prepare you.
What is NOT Covered by the Tour Fee?
Your fee will not cover your airfare or the airfare of any participants (anticipate $1800-2000 round-trip); luggage fees; any meals indicated in the itinerary as on your own; any adult beverages; passport fees; or any other additional expenses not outlined in the itinerary.
Questions?
If you have any questions about the itinerary or our tour's time in NZ, feel free to email or call (706-542-1529) me, Dr. Dennis Hancock, State Forage Extension Specialist. If you have questions about registration or payment, call Tina Bowling at AFGC at 1-800-944-2342.
* * *
TURF
 
2016 Turfgrass Research Field Day

Thursday, August 4 8 a.m. - 2:30 p.m.
This field day is designed for both beginners and veterans interested in turfgrass management, including those who work for golf courses; parks and recreation departments; school athletics and grounds maintenance; professional lawn care services; landscaping; garden centers; sod production; and institutional grounds maintenance. There will be instruction, research tours, exhibits and demonstrations. Lunch will be served to pre-registrants. For more information please visit:
 
http://www.commodities.caes.uga.edu/turfgrass/georgiaturf/FieldDay/2016%20TGFD%20Brochure.pdf
* * *

LOCALLY GROWN
 
Blackberries are available from Blue Star Berry Farm
Contact Tamara at 706-975-5770 or Joan at 706-601-2640
 
Carroll Farms’ new shed on Carroll Chunn Road outside of Woodbury is now open. They are also selling their peaches at their stand at the traffic light in Woodbury. 
 
A couple of Meriwether County growers near Pine Mountain sell their produce at the Chipley Community Co-op at 205 N. King street in Pine Mountain, including Terry and Mike at Strickland Brothers Farm and Jerry Armstrong. Terry has yellow, cannonball and patty pan squash and onions for sale. The hours for the co-op are Tuesday and Thursday: 9-1; Friday: 4-6 and Saturday 8-1. You can also contact Terry at 706-881-2414 to pick up produce at the farm.
 
Peaches, various squash, eggplant, okra, onions and various beans including rattlesnake, purple and Blue Lake are available at Fitzgerald Fruit Farms on Imlac Road outside of Woodbury. You can contact them at 706-553-2795 or visit www.fitzgeraldfruitfarms.com
 
Hudson Farms has two locations to visit. The store at the traffic light in Woodbury is open Monday-Saturday: 9-5 and on Sundays: 10-5. The store on Raleigh Road is open Wednesday-Sunday: 9-5. They have peaches, plums and blueberries for sale.
 
Connie and David Strickland and their daughter, Jennifer Phillips of WJM Farms raise Katahdin and Dorper sheep. They have lambs of both breeds for sale. You can contact David at 770-550-1324.

* * *

LOCAL REQUEST
 
If anyone is interested in renovating an old vineyard of muscadines near Harris City please call Ed Withrow of West Fraser at 706-655-3889. The vineyard is approximately 1 acre in size.

* * *


PESTICDE WASTE DISPOSAL CLEAN DAY
 
The Georgia Department of Agriculture has selected a date and site for the next Pesticide Waste Disposal Clean Day event. The event will be held at the Southern Pines Ag Expo in Dublin, GA, June 29, 2016 from 9:00-3:00. Pre-registration is required due to limited funding and will be suspended once we reach 40,000 lbs.

  • The event is open to licensed private, commercial applicators, farmers, golf and turf industry, pest control companies, commercial contractors, and state agencies.
  • Special arrangements have been made for Chemical Dealers. MXI Environmental Services has agreed to accept additional pesticide waste from dealers. MXI will have the capability to weigh on site and bill dealers at a rate of $1.10 per pound.

Pre-registration will be awarded as received, with a cutoff date of June 24th.
All pre-registration forms need to be returned back to Rick Hayes at ricky.hayes@agr.georgia.gov, Fax: (404) 657-8378, so I can closely monitor the amount of materials for cutoffs. 
For more information please visit: http://agr.georgia.gov/georgia-clean-day.aspx
 
Susan C James
Agriculture and Natural Resources Agent
UGA Extension-Meriwether County
706-672-4235 Office

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Meriwether Public Safety responds to serious accident

Meriwether County Commissioner Bryan Threadgill wanted to acknowledge the Public Safety team responding to the head-on multi-vehicle accident that took place just south of Woodbury on Friday, May 13. Commissioner Threadgill actually drove up on the accident and stated he was so very impressed at the teamwork that was displayed from all the different agencies. He also noted sometimes we don't realize the amount of personnel that respond to something of this nature. According to Brin Jones, Director E911 / Technical Services for Meriwether County, multiple patients were airlifted to trauma centers. "It should also be noted that Commissioner Threadgill is a critical care nurse by trade and was instrumental in helping the EMS team on scene get patients extricated and sent to the various hospitals," Jones said. Agencies represented in the group and involved in the incident, shown with members of the Meriwether Board of Commissioners at the June 8 meeting, were Meriwether County Fire and Rescue, Meriwether County Sheriff's Office, Meriwether County E911, Woodbury Police Department, Manchester Police Department, Georgia State Patrol, and Air Evac. Commissioners present were Commissioner Bryan Threadgill, Commissioner Rosla Plant, Commissioner Shirley Hines, and Vice Chairman Buster McCoy. All had high praise and concurred with Commissioner Threadgill's acknowledgement.

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Sheriff Smith sponsors Meriwether fifth-graders

to attend CHAMPS Camp at GSA Pineland Campus

Issued June 13, 2016

Meriwether Sheriff Chuck Smith sponsored nine area Meriwether County School 5th grade CHAMPS Students to attend CHAMPS Camp at the GSA Pineland Campus, Camp Pioneer for a week of activities and learning. 

“This past week June 6, through June 10, 2016 we had nine of our area 5th grade CHAMPS (Choosing Healthy Activities and Methods Promoting Safety) Students attend the C.H.A.M.P.S. Camp at the Georgia Sheriff’s Youth Home, Pineland Campus that is located in LaGrange, Georgia. Meriwether County CHAMPS/SRO Sergeant Roxie Hightower led our area youth along with approved volunteers in a week long program that was filled with activities and learning.

"The kids had activities that included volleyball, swimming, fishing, canoeing, cookouts and talent shows, along with various other fun things for the youth to enjoy. The youth were exposed to different aspects of public safety too include law enforcement, Fire and EMS, Air Vac and the National Guard who did a ropes course for the kids. The youth also were taught two lessons each day that were conducted by Sergeant Hightower related to dealing with difficult issues, making positive changes in the world, and various other approved topics to teach our kids positive information to help guide them in the future.

"Lieutenant Royce Thompson and I were able to go over and eat lunch with our youth during the camp this past week. They were having a great time and this was a great opportunity for them to be a part of. The youth had a graduation on Friday in which their parents could come and attend. Many of our youth told their parents that they did not want to leave and hated that the camp was coming to an end. We plan to continue sponsoring this for our future 5th grade CHAMPS Students each year.” Sheriff Chuck Smith said.   

“I appreciate the hard work and dedication that SRO Sergeant Roxie Hightower put forth to make this event a success for our youth. Sergeant Hightower handled all of the applications and got this pulled together. She also spent the week helping and instructing, which she stated was a 'great time for all.' I also appreciate Kimble’s Commissary who donated snacks for youth during their week of fun and activities.

"I am glad to serve on the Georgia Sheriff’s Association Youth Home Board of Trustees along with many of my colleges. Through the effort put forth by the Georgia Sheriff’s Association and its community partners it makes a positive difference in the lives of these kids,” Sheriff Smith advised. 

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Pimento Cheese Hamburger at Blackbird Café

named one of Georgia’s '100 Plates Locals Love' 

ATLANTA, June 07, 2016
The pimento cheese hamburger at Blackbird Café in Woodbury, Ga. has been awarded the 2016/2017 “100 Plates Locals Love” distinction by Georgia Department of Economic Development’s Tourism division (GDEcD).
Vicky Matthews’ burger will be part of Georgia Tourism’s second annual list of “100 Plates Locals Love” to be featured in the state’s culinary guide, Georgia Eats.
“Georgia’s cities, towns and backroads are filled with authentic restaurants and culinary specialties that visitors love to experience when they travel,” said Kevin Langston, deputy commissioner for tourism at the Georgia Department of Economic Development. “The list of ‘100 Plates Locals Love’ is our way of providing visitors and locals with suggestions, the same way we would recommend restaurants to our family and friends.”
The Georgia Department of Economic Development’s Tourism Division highlights the state’s culinary greatness in the official guide, Georgia Eats. Following the success of the culinary guide in 2015, the Tourism Division decided to recreate this informative and inspiring guide that entices visitors to sample the state’s world-class cuisine. As a part of the “100 Plates Locals Love” designation, each restaurant is featured in the Georgia Eats culinary guide, which is distributed via the 12 Visitor Information Centers statewide; on the state’s consumer tourism website ExploreGeorgia.org; and on Explore Georgia’s social media channels.
Georgia’s culinary initiative focuses on showcasing the state’s authentic experiences that revolve around food. The state launched a new culinary landing page that features a culinary blogger, the Georgia Flavors videos, flavor tours and more.
The second-annual Georgia Restaurant Week will take place July 18-24, 2016 at participating restaurants throughout Georgia. The event will showcase Georgia’s restaurants to consumers and attract new visitors by showcasing the state’s many culinary tourism assets. During this week-long event, patrons, both local and from out of state, will be able to explore the numerous dining options throughout Georgia for a special price and sample locally grown products that are available in Georgia’s restaurants.
The dishes were selected from nearly 600 nominations that were submitted on ExploreGeorgia.org in November 2015 and evaluated by a panel of judges, who selected the final list of “100 Plates Locals Love.”

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WGTC's Dr. Angela Brown of Meriwether

is state's top technical instructor

Posted by WGTC April 21, 2016

Note: Dr. Angela Brown is a native of Meriwether County and still resides here.

Dr. Angela Brown, an Early Childhood Care and Education instructor at West Georgia Technical College, has been named the state’s top technical education instructor.

Brown, who teaches at West Georgia Tech’s Coweta Campus, received the 2016 Rick Perkins Award for Technical Instruction in ceremonies conducted by the Technical College System of Georgia April 20 in Atlanta. “The Rick Perkins Award is an incredible honor for Dr. Brown, and we are so proud to say that she is one of us,” WGTC President Steve G. Daniel said. “West Georgia Tech is committed to providing the very best technical instruction for our students, and Dr. Brown is a great representative of West Georgia Tech and our entire Technical College System of Georgia. She’s not just one of the best. She’s the best.” .

BrownWinsRPA


The State Rick Perkins Award winner serves as an ambassador for technical education in Georgia. Brown will make many public appearances over the next year including addresses to the Georgia General Assembly, the Governor and the TCSG State Board, in addition to civic organizations, schools and other groups.
“I am deeply honored to have been named the 2016 Rick Perkins Award winner,” Brown said. “I will do my best to represent the entire Technical College System of Georgia.”

Brown’s speech to the 500 guests representing the state’s 22 technical colleges, TCSG staff and statewide partners was a heartrending tribute to the power of technical college to change lives. “The power of a high-quality technical college education impacts not only the students sitting in the seats of those classrooms, but their communities and their families, as well,” she said.

The Rick Perkins Award for Excellence in Technical Education, a statewide program initiated by the Technical College System of Georgia, honors technical education’s most outstanding instructors at the System’s 22 member institutions. The award has been an ongoing statewide event since 1991 and is designed to recognize and honor technical college instructors who make significant contributions to technical education through innovation and leadership in their fields.

Formerly known as the Commissioner’s Award of Excellence, the Rick Perkins Award was renamed in memory of Thomas “Rick” Perkins, an instructor at Carroll Technical Institute, who received the Commissioner’s Award of Excellence prior to his untimely death.
West Georgia Technical College, with campuses in Carroll, Coweta, Douglas, Haralson and Troup counties, and class sites in Heard and Meriwether counties, offers over 120 associate degree, diploma and technical certificate programs of study. A unit of the Technical College System of Georgia, West Georgia Tech is the fourth largest of the state’s 22 technical colleges.

About the Technical College System of Georgia

The 22 colleges of the Technical College System of Georgia (TCSG) are Georgia’s top resource for skilled workers. TCSG offers world-class training in 600 associate degree, diploma and certificate programs to students who are trained on state-of-the-art equipment by instructors who are experts in their fields. The system also houses Georgia’s Office of Adult Education, which promotes and provides adult literacy and education programs, including the GED® testing program, throughout the state. In addition, TCSG partners with companies through Quick Start, the nation’s top customized workforce training program, and through its individual colleges, who work with local industry to provide workforce and training solutions. For more information, visit www.TCSG.edu.

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We're setting up for Saturday's Peaches in the Pines
 
The second annual Peaches in the Pines festival is almost here, now with 50 vendors registered, great food including a BBQ cook-off and homemade peach ice cream, and day-long entertainment including musicians, the Meriwether's Got Talent competition and activities for the kids.
We've got you covered for a peachy kick-off to summer at Peaches in the Pines Saturday at Lake Meriwether near Woodbury Saturday, June 11, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
We're celebrating the kick-off of Peach Season in Meriwether County with a day of outdoor fun.
Enjoy a Disc Golf tournament, find Georgia Grown produce, listen to some Southern music and more all amid a festive setting offering an arts and crafts showcase and food vendor specialties. The Peach Pie Competition is at the FDR State Park information booth.
Spread the word about the Meriwether's Got Talent competition. Entry is only $10 for the talent competition, with day-of registration at 11:30 a.m. The contest starts at 1 p.m. and there is a prize of $100 to the winner.
There will be plenty of fun for kids and adults alike, along with day-long entertainment,
Pony rides and a petting zoo will be among the offerings for the younger set. The kids attractions include: Paw-Paw's Express train rides, Mariea's Fishing Booth, Jubilee Farm - Beverly Miracle - with the petting zoo and pony rides, Baylor Elliott balloons, Andy Kober – Allied Amusements – county-fair style children’s games, Joe & Beth Adcock – spin art for kids, and Glenn’s Fun House – sand art; duck pond, inflatables, among other activities. Last Chance Rescue will be bringing dogs and puppies waiting for adoption, 
Some 50 artisans, craftspeople and local businesses have registered for booth space, and there are more than a dozen food vendors with plenty of tasty treats along with peach-themed competitions from sweets to BBQ. Festival admission includes a chance to sample entries in the BBQ competition ... so far entrants include Real South Concessions, David Martin and Charles Gunter.
An array of entertainment is planned. Along with a talent competition there will be several entertainment groups performing throughout the day, including: Men of Stone Quartet - Gospel; Nearly Normal String Band - blues, old time Appalachian; Jack Couch - soul, Mowtown, '60s and '70s; Kelsey Ray - contemporary and country; Jessi Bounds - contemporary; and Denny Grimes and wife.
Lead sponsor for the 2016 festival is Fitzgerald Fruit Farms. Lake Meriwether is at 728 Lake Meriwether Road, Woodbury, GA. General admission for the June 11 festival is $2, with ages 5 and under admitted free.
"Our Peaches in the Pines Festival is an event coordinated under the umbrella of our Meriwether County Chamber of Commerce and Tourism," said Carolyn McKinley, executive director of the Meriwether County Chamber of Commerce. "Our primary sponsor is Fitzgerald Fruit Farms and the festival is only in its second year. We want to build this festival as a 'down-home' 'old-fashioned' festival with lots of Georgia crafted products; Georgia Grown produce; local and regional original art and fabulous entertainment." 
For full festival information check at www.peachesinthepines.com or call 706-655-3322. You may send an email to peachinthepine@gmail.com or the Meriwether Chamber of Commerce at meriwethertourism@windstream.net. Or check the Peaches in the Pines Facebook page.
Enjoy picnics, boating, fishing and camping at picturesque Lake Meriwether. This 144-acre lake offers bass, bream, catfish and crappie. Lake Meriwether also offers mulitple camp sites for primitive camping and drive-thru sites with electric/water hook-ups (no electricity). 
For the perfect family outing, try the newly opened Disc Golf Course at Lake Meriewther. This 10 basket course, soon to be 18, winds beautifully through trees around Lake Meriwether. The park is at 728 Lake Meriwether Road, Woodbury, GA 30293. For details on camping and fishing call 706-553-5247. 
A day of relaxing and serenity awaits you at the nearby Woodbury Highway 18 Bridge, which offers public access to the Flint River for picnicking, canoeing, rafting, fishing and camping. Take the 13-mile trip to Sprewell Bluff or a 20-mile trip to the 36 Bridge in nearby Thomaston. Or visit nearby Warm Springs for lunch, browsing the shops or a visit to President Franklin D. Roovevelt's Little White House.
* * *
Here is the updated lineup of Peaches in the Pines crafts/arts/products vendors:
-Southern Creation – Embroidery, tee shirts
-Jewelry by Frances – handmade jewelry
-Simply Scrappy – sewing crafts
-Linda Giles – Giles Stained Glass
-Origami Owl Jewelry
-Lisa filacore – natural home décor
-Amber Barfield – purses, totes, jewelry
-Sandra Hollland –Bows n such – children’s toys
-Snazzy ladies soap – handmade soaps
-You are Amazing – skin care
-Marion Dunlap – pink zebra; home fragrance; home décor
-Ltl Wood Creations – wood crafts; cutting boards; games; wood boxes; signs
-Melissa Hicks – paparazzi jewelry & accessories; small crafts
-Blown Glass by Winston – blown glass figurines
-Hairbows by Winston – Hairbows
-Martha’s Cabin – wood art; scented products; needle arts; working on special items with peaches and wood
-Dory Smith – decorative wine bottles; mason jars; frames
-Breanna Mast – hand lettered art; homemade jewelry
-CAP enterprise – kids toys; lite ups; musical toys
-Joe & Beth Adcock – spin arts;
-Jan Holland – perfectly posh spa products
-Jo Soine – candle holders; oil warmers; handmade soap
-Euphoria Therapeutic Massage & Bodywork
-Dennis Kendall – wood crafts; birdhouses; bee traps, etc.
-Becky Shaw – crochet items – blankets; hats; toys; quilts
-Fitzgerald Fruit Farms
-Dorrie Hayden – wood art; gourds; art work
-Beautiful Designs – Nancy Carmack – handmade jewelry, earrings, necklaces
-Anderson Enterprises – tee shirts; key chains; glassware; wall art
-Linda Davis – Grannie’s Goodies – jellies; jams; breads; handcrafted items
-Octopus Enterprises – wire ming trees; mailbox pullout drawer; pencil art; squirrel proof bird feeders
-Shonda Sullivan – Christian sleepwear for ladies
-Samantha Boone – Sorveros Unique Candles – scented candles; soaps; balloon animals and quilted items
-Mina’s Embroidery & Moore, LLC - embroidery and monogram – handbags; picnic time chairs; pens, etc.
-Cynthia Tomblin – Scentsy and Jewelry
-Verizon Wireless
-Kay Harbin – Debbie Linell-David Rumph – pallet signs /furniture, etc.
-Rainbow – Breath of Fresh Air – aromatherapy
-Lisa Barnes – vinyl shirts; cups tops; wreaths
-Amber Thompson – hand stamped rings
-Rebecca Lewis Cameron – pictures; flowers and what-not
-Funderburk – Morgan, Melissa –candles; bath products with rings inside
-Kimberly Miller – personalized prints with names and meanings
-Yellow Rose Farm Soap Company – goat milk soap & bath products; goat milk cheese
-John Kierbow – swings; chairs
-Linda Wilburn – The Print Shop Gallery
-Charlotte Wizinsky – wood art
-Home Craft Gutter Protection Solutions
 

Information booths:
-FDR State Park Information Booth and the Peach Pie Competition
-InsureGa – educational information on healthcare in GA
-LaGrange Amateur Radio Club doing "ham" radio demonstrations
-STAGVETS Comfort Farms – Services to Veterans, introducing them to organic farming
-County Extension – informational – Agriculture & Natural Resources Agent
-Georgia Forestry
-Southern Rivers

Food vendors include:
-Anthony McKee – Dogs; chops; fries; cotton candy; funnel cake
-Betty Respress – pork skins; peach lemonade; boiled peanuts
-Cassandra Clements – potatoes with sauces
-Ruby’s Kitchen – Desserts; candied apples; pecans; sauces
-Kona Ice of Warner Robbins – Shaved Ice
-Teresa Peterson – Italian ice
-Real South Concessions – BBQ; Boiled peanuts; peach tea
-Two Sistaz Cooking – greens; chicken; mac & cheese
-Sarah Clark – Fries & soft drinks
-Larry Fort – funnel cake; French fries; nacho and chicken fingers
-Tara Hall – old fashioned fried pies
-David Martin
-Charles Gunter
-Greenville High School Class of 71 – Brunswick stew & watermelon slices
-Mark Bynum – Fish Plates

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UGA Extension Meriwether County ANR E-Newsletter
June 10, 2016

LIVESTOCK
Meriwether County Cattlemen’s Meeting
Our next meeting is Tuesday, June 14th at 7:30 PM. The sponsor is the Meriwether County Farm Bureau Federation and Brandon Ashley from the Commodities Division of Georgia Farm Bureau will be part of the program. Also speaking is Will Bentley, Executive Vice-President of the Georgia Cattlemen’s Association and the Georgia Beef Board. Mr. Ashley and Mr. Bentley represent two very important organizations to cattlemen. They strongly support farmers as spokespeople to the legislature, by promoting farm products, by developing markets, and by funding research. Each one of you, if you are farmers, has been helped by these organizations and should be supporting them in return by becoming members. The Meriwether County Farm Bureau is a big supporter of UGA Extension and I know that I can count on them for support for programming in our county.
Help them make sure that you have the voice and the means to run a successful farm.
To learn more or to join visit:
http://www.georgiacattlemen.org/default.aspx http://www.gfb.org/

UGA Extension Northwest Georgia Master Cattleman Program
September 6-October 25, 2016 on Tuesday evenings from 6:30-8:30
Location: 21 Vulcan Materials Road LaGrange, GA 30240
This eight week program will include topics on forages, external parasites, facilities, diseases, reproduction, economics, animal selection, EPD’s, record keeping and more. Program participants that attend six of the eight sessions will receive a certificate of completion and UGA Master Cattleman Cap. Registration is $75 per person and includes a notebook of proceedings, refreshments each night and a steak dinner on the final night. Pre-Registration deadline is August 12, 2016. Checks can be made payable to Troup County Extension or you may call in (706.883.1675) and pay by credit card.
Below is a schedule of the classes:
September 6
Jason Duggin - Welcome
Dr. Dennis Hancock - Forages
Dr. Lawton Stewart - Nutrition
Dr. Jacob Segers - Nutrition
September 13
Dr. Nancy Hinkle - External Parasites
Dr. John Worley - Facilities

September 20
Dr. Lawton Stewart - Nutrition
Dr. Jacob Segers - Nutrition
September 27
Dr. Brent Credille - Diseases / Agro-terrorism
October 4
Dr. Lee Jones - Reproduction
October 11
Dr. John McKissick - Economics
October 18
Selection - Animal Selection Basics
Dr. Ronnie Silcox - EPD’s and Record Keeping
October 25
Jason Duggin or Carole Knight - Meats and Beef Quality Assurance
Will Bentley - Georgia Cattlemen’s Association
----------------------
For the results of the Calhoun HERD sale on June 1st please visit:
http://blog.extension.uga.edu/…/20…/06/Herd-Sale-Summary.pdf
To learn more about the Heifer Evaluation and Reproductive Development Program please visit: http://blog.extension.uga.edu/beef/programs/
***********************************************
FESTIVAL
Peaches in the Pines
Join us tomorrow at Lake Meriwether 9-4. The festival will feature local artists, live entertainment, food vendors, kids' activities, karaoke competition and many more activities. A Disc Golf Tournament will also be taking place. Fitzgerald Fruit Farms will have local produce and ice cream made from their fresh fruit. I will be there with various UGA Extension handouts. If you have any plant problems or curiousities please be sure to come by and share them with me. Admission is $2.00 with children under 5 admitted for free. 
http://www.exploregeorgia.org/li…/56469-peaches-in-the-pines
*************************************************
BENEFICIALS
This week Mr. James Davis in Manchester brought me pecan stem phylloxera with a twist. The opened galls were crawling with lady beetle larvae. Below are images of a lady beetle adult, eggs, larva and pupa. Seeing lady beetle larvae for the first time, many people will think that their plants are being attacked by alien creatures. They don’t really look very “friendly” but they are to gardeners. The larvae, along with the adults, are voracious feeders of soft-bodied insects and eggs. Hence the reason for the lady beetle larvae crawling all over the opened galls. If you remember the image that I took of the galls that I had cut open, I commented that I couldn’t believe how many phylloxera were packed inside. What a ready-made feast for the lady beetle larvae. For those of you who can’t have your trees sprayed learn to recognize the “friendly” insects that help us battle these pests. More than likely there are others and if I am fortunate someone will bring them to my attention.
************************************************
PESTS OF THE WEEK
While hiking on the Pine Mountain trail recently I came across some oak trees that had symptoms of bacterial issues. The first is a huge gall created by Agrobacterium tumefaciens. This bacterium resides in the soil and will infect roots as well as the above ground tissue of woody plants. To read more about this bacterium and how it can impact tree fruits visit:
http://www.ent.uga.edu/pea…/peachhbk/bacterial/crowngall.pdf
The next is slime flux, also known as bacterial wetwood. I could smell it long before I could find a tree with it. It gives off a rather yeasty, alcoholic smell. A honeybee was feeding off of the flux. Insects have been known to act in a drunken manner after such feeding because of the alcoholic content.
Below is what the Georgia Forestry Commission has to say about slime flux:
Slime flux or wetwood is a condition in trees that is characterized by the bleeding of sap through a wound in the bark (Figure 148). Fluxing may occur in the spring and/or fall and is generally confined to trees larger than 12 inches in diameter. Some type of wound caused by mechanical means; wood split by freezing or wind injury usually precedes slime flux. Oaks, elms and maples are the species most often affected by slime flux but certain softwoods are susceptible. The fluxing or oozing of sap is a result of bacterial activity at the wound site, which may be deep within the tree. As the bacteria grow pressure is produced and has to be released to the outside. When this happens, fluxing is evident on the outside of the tree. The sap may be clear and alcoholic in odor or viscid and odorous and variously colored.
Kim Coder, Professor of Community Forestry, Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, UGA has these recommendations to make for the problem:
The slime is toxic to the bark and may kill large patches when it stays on the bark for a long time. Rinsing twice a year may minimize the damage, but determine what weakened the tree initially and provide best management practices to improve tree vigor.
***********************************************
LOCALLY GROWN
Blackberries are available from Blue Star Berry Farm
Contact Tamara at 706-975-5770 or Joan at 706-601-2640
Carroll Farms’ new shed on Carroll Chunn Road outside of Woodbury is now open. They are also selling their peaches at their stand at the traffic light in Woodbury.
A couple of Meriwether County growers near Pine Mountain sell their produce at the Chipley Community Co-op at 205 N. King street in Pine Mountain, including Terry and Mike at Strickland Brothers Farm and Jerry Armstrong. Terry has yellow, cannonball and patty pan squash and onions for sale. The hours for the co-op are Tuesday and Thursday: 9-1; Friday: 4-6 and Saturday 8-1. You can also contact Terry at 706-881-2414 to pick up produce at the farm.
Peaches, various squash, eggplant, okra, onions and various beans including rattlesnake, purple and Blue Lake are available at Fitzgerald Fruit Farms on Imlac Road outside of Woodbury. You can contact them at 706-553-2795 or visit www.fitzgeraldfruitfarms.com
Hudson Farms has two locations to visit. The store at the traffic light in Woodbury is open Monday-Saturday: 9-5 and on Sundays: 10-5. The store on Raleigh Road is open Wednesday-Sunday: 9-5. They have peaches, plums and blueberries for sale.
Connie and David Strickland and their daughter, Jennifer Phillips of WJM Farms raise Katahdin and Dorper sheep. They have lambs of both breeds for sale. You can contact David at 770-550-1324.
*********************************************
LOCAL REQUESTS
If anyone is interested in renovating an old vineyard of muscadines near Harris City please call Ed Withrow of West Fraser at 706-655-3889. The vineyard is approximately 1 acre in size.
I have someone in the county interested in having help taking care of their yard and garden for one day a week. If you have experience doing this kind of work and are interested please give me a call at 706-977-0882. If I don’t answer please leave a message and I will get back to you.
********************************************
Pesticide Waste Disposal Clean Day
The Georgia Department of Agriculture has selected a date and site for the next Pesticide Waste Disposal Clean Day event. The event will be held at the Southern Pines Ag Expo in Dublin, GA, June 29, 2016 from 9:00-3:00. Pre-registration is required due to limited funding and will be suspended once we reach 40,000 lbs.
· The event is open to licensed private, commercial applicators, farmers, golf and turf industry, pest control companies, commercial contractors, and state agencies.
· Special arrangements have been made for Chemical Dealers. MXI Environmental Services has agreed to accept additional pesticide waste from dealers. MXI will have the capability to weigh on site and bill dealers at a rate of $1.10 per pound.
Pre-registration will be awarded as received, with a cutoff date of June 24th.
All pre-registration forms need to be returned back to Rick Hayes at ricky.hayes@agr.georgia.gov, Fax: (404) 657-8378, so I can closely monitor the amount of materials for cutoffs. 
For more information please visit: http://agr.georgia.gov/georgia-clean-day.aspx
************************************************
USDA
To keep up-to-date with weather forecasts you can get information sent directly to your email. Please visit the USDA website to sign up for information on many topics including weather reports:
https://public.govdelivery.com/acc…/USDANRCS/subscriber/new…
For the June 9th water and climate update visit:
https://content.govdelivery.com/…/USDANRCS/bulletins/14e5eb7
************************************************** 
Have a great weekend and I hope to see some of you at the Peaches in the Pines tomorrow,
Susan
Susan C James
Agriculture and Natural Resources Agent
UGA Extension-Meriwether County
706-672-4235 Office

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We've got you covered for a Peachy kick-off to

Summer at Saturday's Peaches in the Pines 

June 9, 2016

With more than 40 vendors registered, great food including a BBQ cook-off and homemade peach ice cream, and day-long entertainment including musicians, the Meriwether's Got Talent competition and activities for the kids, we've got you covered for a peachy kick-off to summer at Saturday's Peaches in the Pines festival at Lake Meriwether.


We're celebrating the kick-off of Peach Season in Meriwether County with a day of outdoor fun at the second annual Peaches in the Pines festival at Lake Meriwether near Woodbury this Saturday, June 11 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Enjoy a Disc Golf tournament, find Georgia Grown produce, listen to some Southern music and more all amid a festive setting offering an arts and crafts showcase and food vendor specialties. The Peach Pie Competition is at the FDR State Park information booth.

And spread the word about the Meriwether's Got Talent competition. Entry is only $10 for the talent competition, with day-of registration at 11:30 a.m. The contest starts at 1 p.m. and there is a prize of $100 to the winner.

There will be plenty of fun for kids and adults alike, along with day-long entertainment,
Pony rides and a petting zoo will be among the offerings for the younger set. The Kids Korner attractions include: Paw-Paw's Express train rides, Mariea's Fishing Booth, Jubilee Farm - Beverly Miracle - with the petting zoo and pony rides, and Baylor Elliott balloons, among other activities. Last Chance Rescue will be bringing dogs and puppies waiting for adoption, 
More than 40 artisans, craftspeople and local businesses have already registered for booth space, and there are more than a dozen food vendors with plenty of tasty treats along with peach-themed competitions from sweets to BBQ. Festival admission includes a chance to sample entries in the BBQ competition ... so far entrants include Real South Concessions, David Martin and Charles Gunter.
An array of entertainment is planned. Along with a talent competition there will be several entertainment groups performing throughout the day, including: Men of Stone Quartet - Gospel; Nearly Normal String Band - blues, old time Appalachian; Jack Couch - soul, Mowtown, '60s and '70s; Kelsey Ray - contemporary and country; Jessi Bounds - contemporary; and Denny Grimes and wife.
Lead sponsor for the 2016 festival is Fitzgerald Fruit Farms. Lake Meriwether is at 728 Lake Meriwether Road, Woodbury, GA. General admission for the June 11 festival is $2, with ages 5 and under admitted free.
"Our Peaches in the Pines Festival is an event coordinated under the umbrella of our Meriwether County Chamber of Commerce and Tourism," said Carolyn McKinley, executive director of the Meriwether County Chamber of Commerce. "Our primary sponsor is Fitzgerald Fruit Farms and the festival is only in its second year. We want to build this festival as a 'down-home' 'old-fashioned' festival with lots of Georgia crafted products; Georgia Grown produce; local and regional original art and fabulous entertainment." 
Vendor spaces for this second-annual festival are 12 by 12 feet and are $25 for individuals or businesses, $15 for church or civic groups, and an extra $10 for electricity (limited spaces). Set-up will be beginning Friday. 
For full festival information and registration forms check at www.peachesinthepines.com or call 706-655-3322. You may send an email to peachinthepine@gmail.com or the Meriwether Chamber of Commerce at meriwethertourism@windstream.net. Or check the Peaches in the Pines Facebook page.
Enjoy picnics, boating, fishing and camping at picturesque Lake Meriwether. This 144-acre lake offers bass, bream, catfish and crappie. Lake Meriwether also offers mulitple camp sites for primitive camping and drive-thru sites with electric/water hook-ups (no electricity). 
For the perfect family outing, try the newly opened Disc Golf Course at Lake Meriewther. This 10 basket course, soon to be 18, winds beautifully through trees around Lake Meriwether. The park is at 728 Lake Meriwether Road, Woodbury, GA 30293. For details on camping and fishing call 706-553-5247. 
A day of relaxing and serenity awaits you at the nearby Woodbury Highway 18 Bridge, which offers public access to the Flint River for picnicking, canoeing, rafting, fishing and camping. Take the 13-mile trip to Sprewell Bluff or a 20-mile trip to the 36 Bridge in nearby Thomaston. Or visit nearby Warm Springs for lunch, browsing the shops or a visit to President Franklin D. Roovevelt's Little White House.

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Meriwether 4-H has Summer Activities!

Parents, Grandparents, Aunts, Uncles, Friends and Neighbors!
This is a reminder that Meriwether County 4-H has some amazing activities planned for your child or a child you know this summer! Take a look at the summer activities guide (attached) for more details on the trips and sign up today to reserve your spot! Don't delay!
Trips this summer will include an air force plane museum and the amazing escape room, Zoo Atlanta, Coca-Cola Space center and an aerial challenge (ropes course in the sky), Bowling/ water treatment plant, and Roller-skating and laser tag!
If any of these trips peak your interest don't hesitate, call today and save your spot!
(Registration was requested by May 31. For availability CALL: 706-672-4235)
Abby Burns
Meriwether County
4-H Extension Associate
ahburns@uga.edu
706-672-4235

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Fun for kids at Peaches in the Pines

There will be plenty of fun for kids and adults alike, along with day-long entertainment, at the second annual Peaches in the Pines festival at Lake Meriwether this Saturday, June 11 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

We're celebrating the kick-off of Peach Season in Meriwether County with a day of outrdoor fun. Just announced, pony rides and a petting zoo will be among the offerings for the younger set. The Kids Korner attractions include: Last Chance Rescue with dogs and puppies for adoption, Paw-Paw's Express train rides, Mariea's Fishing Booth, Jubilee Farm - Beverly Miracle - with the petting zoo and pony rides, and Baylor Elliott balloons.

And spread the word about the Meriwether's Got Talent competition. Entry is only $10 for the talent competition, with registration at 11:30 a.m. The contest starts at 1 p.m. and there is a prize of $100 to the winner.

Enjoy a Disc Golf tournament, Georgia Grown produce, homemade peach ice cream and more all amid a festive setting offering a local arts and crafts showcase and food vendor specialties. The Peach Pie Competition is at the FDR State Park information booth.

More than 40 artisans, craftspeople and local businesses have already registered for booth space, and there are more than a dozen food vendors with plenty of tasty treats along with peach-themed competitions from sweets to BBQ. Festival admission includes a chance to sample entries in the BBQ competition ... so far entrants include Real South Concessions, David Martin and Charles Gunter.

An array of entertainment is planned. Along with a talent competition there will be several entertainment groups performing throughout the day, including: Men of Stone Quartet - Gospel; Nearly Normal String Band - blues, old time Appalachian; Jack Couch - soul, Mowtown, '60s and '70s; Kelsey Ray - contemporary and country; Jessi Bounds - contemporary; and Denny Grimes and wife.

Lead sponsor for the 2016 festival is Fitzgerald Fruit Farms. Lake Meriwether is at 728 Lake Meriwether Road, Woodbury, GA. General admission for the June 11 festival is $2, with ages 5 and under admitted free.

"Our Peaches in the Pines Festival is an event coordinated under the umbrella of our Meriwether County Chamber of Commerce and Tourism," said Carolyn McKinley, executive director of the Meriwether County Chamber of Commerce. "Our primary sponsor is Fitzgerald Fruit Farms and the festival is only in its second year. We want to build this festival as a 'down-home' 'old-fashioned' festival with lots of Georgia crafted products; Georgia Grown produce; local and regional original art and fabulous entertainment. The festival will be held on June 11, 2016 and you and your family are invited. Admission is $2 for adults and kids under 5 get in free. There are plenty of vendor spots available for $25. Help us to promote this Meriwether County Festival. Remember bringing tourists into our community boosts our economy and gives us a chance to share our many assets."

Any additional interested vendors may check the Peaches in the Pines Facebook and web pages for information and a registration form, or call 706-655-3322. Booths for this second-annual festival are 12 by 12 feet and are $25 for individuals or businesses, $15 for church or civic groups, and an extra $10 for electricity (limited spaces). Go to vendor information on the website www.peachesinthepines.com for details and to download a registration form or check the Peaches in the Pines Facebook page.

For full festival information check at www.peachesinthepines.com or call 706-655-3322. You may send an email to peachinthepine@gmail.com or the Meriwether Chamber of Commerce at meriwethertourism@windstream.net.

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Are your squash plants collapsing and dying?

UGA Extension Meriwether County ANR E-Newsletter
June 5, 2016


So last week’s issue was long; this issue is short. I especially want growers to be aware of two squash pests that showed up this week on yellow squash plants.


PESTS OF THE WEEK
Squash vine borer, Melittia cucurbitae


These are clear wing moths, but look a lot like wasps as they fly through the garden. The female has a reddish body and black wings with clear areas. She flies down into the crown of the plant so that she can lay eggs on the stems. The larvae eclose and chew into the stems and then tunnel though them. When they really get going you can see frass being pushed out of the stems. When enough damage is done the whole plant begins to wilt. Usually there will be lots of squash fruit developing when this damage occurs. Timing of any insecticide for this pest is critical because they will be most effective on the larvae before they manage to bore into the stems. If you see the adult female in your plants she is most likely laying eggs. You can apply an insecticide at the base of the plants. Check out the website given below under squash bugs to see which chemicals can be used. Organic growers can use pyrethrin or spinosad. Please pay attention to my notes on protecting pollinators. Growers who don’t want to use an insecticide will have to scout daily to find either the larvae or the early boring damage. Exposed larvae can be crushed or drowned in soapy water. If they have gotten into the stem they can be pursued by making a lengthwise slit in the stem until located and then pierced with the knife. I have known people who used really large needles or old-fashioned hatpins to poke repeatedly up the length of the stem until they managed to pierce the larvae. Once you have dispatched the larvae you can cover the damaged portion of the stem with soil which should encourage rooting.


Squash photo by Robert Lane, Sam Houston State University


Vine borer photo by Vince Hickey 
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Squash Bugs, Anasa tristis


I also saw either squash bug eggs or adults in two locations. I'm sharing images of the eggs, an immature and an adult.

If you only have a few squash plants you can scout for the eggs (usually on the underside of the leaves but not always) and crush them. Frequently they are laid in between leaf veins and they usually form some kind of linear pattern. These insects cause damage directly by feeding on the plants but they also secrete toxic saliva that gets in the plant when they feed. This toxin causes the plant to wilt (known as anasa wilt) if there is a high enough population of the bugs. It is important to implement control measures before the insects are able to reproduce. If you have too many plants to look for eggs, the best time to treat is when you have immatures (nymphs). The adults will not be as susceptible to chemical applications.
Home gardeners can use a number of chemicals including pyrethroids, carbaryl and esfenvalerate. Organic growers can use pyrethrin or spinosad. Be very cautious when making insecticide applications. Avoid spraying when bees are active because they are necessary for pollination in cucurbit crops. Try spraying very late in the day. Immatures and adults can also be handpicked and dropped into a container of soapy water where they will drown. 
For a complete list of insecticides visit the website below and scroll down to page 3 (152) : 
http://www.ent.uga.edu/…/GA-Pest-Management-2016-Home-VEGET…
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PEACHES IN THE PINES
This festival will be happening Saturday, the 11th from 9-4 at Lake Meriwether. I will be there with various UGA Extension handouts. If you have any plant problems or curiousities please be sure to come by and share them with me. 
http://www.exploregeorgia.org/li…/56469-peaches-in-the-pines
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LIVESTOCK
Deep South Stocker Conference
August 4-5, 2016 in Carrollton, GA
The eighth annual Deep South Stocker Conference is headed to Georgia. This year’s program will offer a combination of seminars, demonstrations, as well as tours. The cost of this year’s conference is $100. This includes all of the seminars, demos, notebook, tour, lunch both days, and dinner. For more information on the program, registration, and location, please visit: http://www.deepsouthstocker.org/
I will have more on this event as the time gets nearer.
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WINEGRAPES
2016 Southern Winegrape Symposium
June 11, 2016 from 8:30 AM-3:00 PM
Carroll County Ag Center, 900 Newnan Road, Carrollton, Georgia
Sponsored by
The Vineyard and Winery Association of West Georgia
The program is for current and aspiring individuals interested in learning more about winegrape growing and making wine. Topics include: Disease and Insect Pest Management, Pesticide Spraying and Safety, Business Planning, Specialty Marketing, Vineyard Test Plots, and much more….
Pre-registration: $50 per person by May 27; $25 for second person from vineyard and $65 after May 27 and at the door.
For more information visit: www.vinewinewga.com
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Have a wonderful week,
Susan
Susan C James
Agriculture and Natural Resources Agent
UGA Extension-Meriwether County
706-672-4235 Office

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Free Summer Feeding Sites for Kids listed

Here is the list of summer free feeding sites for kids in Meriwether County, courtesy of Jennifer Corcione, Executive Director, Meriwether County Family Connection. For more information she may be reached at 17234 Roosevelt Hwy, Bldg. A, Greenville, GA 30222, Phone (706) 672-4016

Many Meriwether children go without balanced meals in the summer when school is not in session. Corcione urges everyone to spread the word about the free feeding sites.

The free meals are offered for all kids ages 1-18. The program is offered through the Georgia School Nutrition Program and the Georgia Department of Education.

The Meriwether sites include: 

Mobile Bus Feeding Sites

Hill Haven Apartments, 180 Haven Cir. Greenville, GA 30222
Lunch: 9:50-10:10, Mon.-Fri., June 1-July 29

R.D. Hill Plaza Apartments, 428 R.D. Hill Plaza Dr. Greenville, GA 30222
Lunch: 10:15-10:35, Mon.-Fri., June 1-July 29

Hill Street Apartments, 709 Hunter Cir. Greenville, GA 30222
Lunch: 10:40-11:00, Mon.-Fri., June 1-July 29

George E. Washington Elementary, 18425 Main St. Woodbury, GA 30293
Lunch: 11:20-11:40, Mon.-Fri., June 1-July 29

Mt. Pleasant Baptist Church Fellowship Hall, 146 Tulip Rd. Woodbury, GA 30293
Lunch: 11:45-12:05, Mon.-Fri., June 1-July 29

Warm Springs Apartments, 4161 Whitehouse Pkwy. Warm Springs, GA 31830
Lunch: 12:20-12:40, Mon.-Fri., June 1-July 29

Cross Creek Apartments, 1129 Roosevelt Hwy. Manchester, GA 31816
Lunch: 12:50-1:10, Mon.-Fri., June 1-July 29

Hidden Creek Apartments, 1000 Nebula Rd. Manchester, GA 31816
Lunch: 1:15-1:35, Mon.-Fri., June 1-July 29

Manchester Housing Authority, 522 MLK Dr. Manchester, GA 31816
Lunch: 1:40-2:00, Mon.-Fri., June 1-July 29


Summer Feeding Sites

Greenville Middle/High School, 17656 Roosevelt Hwy, Greenville, GA 30222
Breakfast: 9:30-10:00 & Lunch: 1:00-1:30, Mon.-Thurs., June 1-July 28

Manchester High School, 405 5th St. Manchester, GA 31816
Breakfast: 8:15-8:45 & Lunch: 11:00-11:30, Mon.-Fri., June 1-July 29

AURS Summer Focus-Luthersville, 104 Wortham Rd. Luthersville, GA 30251
Breakfast: 8:30-9:00 & Lunch: 12:00-1:00, Tues.-Thurs., June 7-June 30

AURS Summer Focus-Woodbury, 18425 Main St. Woodbury, GA 30293
Breakfast: 8:30-9:00 & Lunch: 12:00-1:00, Tues.-Thurs., June 7-June 30

Fellowship Missionary Baptist Church, 49 Todd Rd. Greenville, GA 30222
Supper: 5:00-5:30, Mon.-Fri., June 20- June 24

Church of Christ/Greentown Heights, 407 Roger Brawner Ave. Manchester, GA 31816
Lunch: 12:00-1:00, Mon.-Fri., June 27-July 1

Lone Oak St. Paul CME Church, 463 Sewell Rd. Grantville, GA 30220
Supper: 6:00-7:00, Mon.-Wed., June 27-June 29

***There will be no meal service July 4-July 8***
"USDA is an Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer."

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Meriwether Unemployment 6 Percent for April

Meriwether County's unemployment rate was 6 percent for April, compared to 5 percent for the state overall. Meriwether's unemployment rate is down from 6.6 percent recorded for March. 

The county's labor force is calculated at 8,827, with 8,299 employed and 528 unemployed.

Here is a run-down, provided by the Meriwether Development Authority.

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Peaches in the Pines back for second year


Kick off summer with a celebration of Peach Season in Meriwether County with the second annual Peaches in the Pines festival returning to Lake Meriwether June 11 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
A variety of artisans and craftspeople have already registered for booth space, and there are more than a dozen food vendors with plenty of tasty treats along with peach-themed competitions from sweets to barbecue.
Attendees will get to help judge the festival's first BBQ competition. Contestants registered so far include Real South Concessions, David Martin and Charles Gunter.
An array of entertainment is planned, including the day-of Meriwether's Got Talent competition with a $100 prize to the winner. Along with a talent competition there are several entertainment groups already planning to perform, including: Men of Stone Quartet - Gospel; Nearly Normal String Bank - blues, old time Appalachian; Jack Couch - soul, Mowtown, '60s and '70s; Kelsey Ray - contemporary and country; and Jessi Bounds - contemporary.
Contestants for the Meriwether's Got Talent competition, $10 entry fee, may register on-site starting at 11:30 a.m. and the competition starts at 1 p.m. There is a prize of $100 to the winner.
Enjoy a local arts and crafts showcase, Kiddie Korner, a Disc Golf tournament, Georgia Grown produce, homemade peach ice cream and more.
Lead sponsor for the 2016 festival is Fitzgerald Fruit Farms. Lake Meriwether is at 728 Lake Meriwether Road, Woodbury, GA. General admission for the June 11 festival is $2, with ages 5 and under admitted free.
"Our Peaches in the Pines Festival is an event coordinated under the umbrella of our Meriwether County Chamber of Commerce and Tourism," said Carolyn McKinley, executive director of the 
Meriwether County Chamber of Commerce. "Our primary sponsor is Fitzgerald Fruit Farms and the festival is only in its second year. We want to build this festival as a 'down-home' 'old-fashioned' festival with lots of Georgia crafted products; Georgia Grown produce; local and regional original art and fabulous entertainment. The festival will be held on June 11, 2016 and you and your family are invited. Admission is $2.00 for adults and kids under 5 get in free. There are plenty of vendor spots available for $25.00. Help us to promote this Meriwether County Festival by sharing the page with your friends.
"Remember bringing tourists into our community boosts our economy and gives us a chance to share our many assets."
More than two dozen arts and crafts vendors have already registered, but there is still space for more. Anyone interested may check the Peaches in the Pines Facebook and web pages for information and a registration form, or call 706-655-3322.
Booths for this second-annual festival are 12 by 12 feet and are $25 for individuals or businesses, $15 for church or civic groups, and an extra $10 for electricity (limited spaces). Go to vendor information on the website www.peachesinthepines.com for details and to download a registration form or check the Peaches in the Pines Facebook page.
For full festival information check at www.peachesinthepines.com or call 706-655-3322. You may send an email to peachinthepine@gmail.com or the Meriwether Chamber of Commerce at meriwethertourism@windstream.net.
* * *
Here is the lineup of crafts/arts/products vendors so far:
-Southern Creation – Embroidery, tee shirts
-Jewelry by Frances – handmade jewelry
-Simply Scrappy – sewing crafts
-Linda Giles – Giles Stained Glass
-Origami Owl Jewelry
-Lisa filacore – natural home décor
-Mindy Plummer – purses, totes, jewelry
-Sandra Hollland –Bows n such – children’s toys
-Snazzy ladies soap – handmade soaps
-You are Amazing – skin care
-Marion Dunlap – pink zebra; home fragrance; home décor
-Ltl Wood Creations – wood crafts; cutting boards; games; wood boxes; signs
-Melissa Hicks – paparazzi jewelry & accessories; small crafts
-Blown Glass by Winston – blown glass figurines
-Hairbows by Winston – Hairbows
-Martha’s Cabin – wood art; scented products; need arts; working on special items with peaches and wood
-God’s Herb Garden- natural skin care products
-Lynn Poisson – embroidery on koozies; baby blankets;
-Dory Smith – decorative wine bottles; mason jars; frames
-Breanna Mast – hand lettered art; homemade jewelry
-CAP enterprise – kids toys; lite ups; musical toys
-Joe & Beth Adcock – spin arts; etched glassware; vinyl decals
-Jan Holland – perfectly posh spa products
-Jo Soine – candle holders; oil warmers; handmade soap
-Euphoria Therapeutic Massage & Bodywork
Dennis Kendall – wood crafts; birdhouses; bee traps, etc.
-Becky Shaw – crochet items – blankets; hats; toys; quilts
-Fitzgerald Fruit Farms

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UGA Extension Meriwether County ANR E-Newsletter

May 27, 2016


PESTS OF THE WEEK
This issue is a little longer than usual (and may have taken much longer to download) because of all the pests and diseases I’ve encountered or had folks ask about this week. As producers and gardeners, we can’t ignore the influence that the weather can have on organisms. One of the impacts of a mild, wet winter is the potential for a high number of pests and diseases on crops. Individuals and inoculum will have easily overwintered with the mild temperatures and also the high humidity that most need to survive. On the flip side, the Georgia poultry industry was spared potential devastating losses from avian influenza since infected wild fowl were not pushed into our area from severe cold weather northwest of us. As the saying goes, win some, lose some, and no one knows this better than farmers.
One of my favorite jobs is scouting. I get to incorporate knowledge from all of my fields of study and experience-horticulture, plant pathology and entomology. Walking through a field, orchard or landscape I look for signs and symptoms of pests and diseases. This spring I haven’t had to look very hard. This week I have lots to share.


Strawberry growers have actually been pretty fortunate until now. After last week’s rain and with plant canopies becoming dense, gray mold (Botrytis cinerea) finally showed up in fields. All growers can do is keep up with the fungicide sprays, making sure that they get good coverage on their plants.

I’ve seen plum curculio (Conotrachelus nenuphar) damage on peaches, plums and apples. I’ve also identified this pest for others when they notice the very distinctive crescent-shaped scar the female leaves when she deposits an egg (oviposits) in the fruit. The larva that ecloses from the egg will tunnel through the fruit feeding, leave the fruit and drop to the ground where it will eventually pupate. After about thirty days a new adult will emerge to start the cycle over again. It’s possible in Georgia to have two and maybe three generations of plum curculio.


Growers time their first sprays for this pest early on between petal fall and shuck split and make two more applications 7-10 days apart. After that a spray is made every 2-3 weeks until 14 days pre-harvest. Home gardeners may follow this general schedule also but it may vary depending upon the insecticide used so read labels carefully and follow the label’s directions completely. Insecticides that home gardeners may use will be labeled for fruit trees and may contain bifenthrin, esfenvalerate, malathion and permethrin. Organic growers will want to use the product Surround WP which is a refined kaolin clay product that is labeled for tree fruits. Surround WP may be used during fruit set but if growers want to avoid having residue on the fruit stop use when the fruit is ¼ of expected size. Read labels carefully!
To read more about plum curculio please visit:
http://www.ent.uga.edu/pe…/peachhbk/insects/plumcurculio.pdf


Last week’s rain also splashed spores of Alternaria solani onto the lower foliage of tomato plants causing early blight. Even plants grown on plastic mulched beds are susceptible. Eventually the disease will move upwards turning foliage brown. If you look closely before symptoms become severe you will find spots with distinctive concentric rings, as in the photo below to the left. To the right are the microscopic asexual spores of Alternaria, some of my favorite to photograph. Organic growers will remove the lower leaves on plants before spores get a chance to infect the plant. Conventional growers use fungicides to protect the foliage. If you think you have early blight give me a call. All of my contact information is at the bottom of the e-newsletter.


Pecan Stem Phylloxera (one more time)


Just outside the back door of our building is a young pecan tree. It has small galls of the pecan stem phylloxera that I wrote about last week. Some of the galls have already cracked open releasing the insects inside. I gathered some of the intact ones on Wednesday and sliced them open. Below are a few of the images I took on the microscope. It’s amazing how many insects were packed into these galls.


Sometimes things may seem like a pest to the inexperienced but they are not. I’ve heard people talk about destroying insect eggs (and insect adults) without learning whether they represent a threat or may actually be beneficial. Many insects are predators or parasitoids that can have a major impact on pest species including other insects. For some people the praying mantis may come to mind but bear in mind it will eat the good guys as well as the bad ones. Some beneficials are much more specific, such as the braconid wasp that lays eggs in caterpillars like the hornworm below. The hornworm was feasting on eggplant and then became a feast itself. Larvae will feed on the internal tissues and then chew their way out to pupate. You can see the pupae attached to the outside of the caterpillar exoskeleton.
While looking at pecan foliage infected with pecan scab I noticed a cluster of eggs on the underside of the leaves. They were quite different from the more typical round or oblong shape. These are eggs of an assassin bug, family Reduviidae. They may be the eggs of the wheel bug which is a large insect capable of feeding on other large insects. Like the praying mantis it will feed on the good as well as the bad but it can still be considered beneficial. It has a very painful bite so beware.


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LOCALLY GROWN
Blackberries are now available from Blue Star Berry Farm
Contact Tamara at 706-975-5770 or Joan at 706-601-2640


Carroll Farms is finishing up a new shed on Carroll Chunn Road outside of Woodbury. They are selling their peaches now at their stand at the traffic light in Woodbury.
A couple of Meriwether County growers near Pine Mountain sell their produce at the Chipley Community Co-op at 205 N. King street in Pine Mountain, including Terry and Mike at Strickland Brothers Farm and Jerry Armstrong. Terry has strawberries and onions for sale now and will have yellow squash on Saturday. The hours for the co-op are Tuesday and Thursday: 9-1; Friday: 4-6 and Saturday 8-1. You can also contact Terry at 706-881-2414.
Peaches, strawberries and onions are available at Fitzgerald Fruit Farms on Imlac Road outside of Woodbury. You can contact them at 706-553-2795 or visit www.fitzgeraldfruitfarms.com
Hudson Farms has two locations to visit. The store at the traffic light in Woodbury is open Monday-Saturday: 9-5 and on Sundays: 10-5. The store on Raleigh Road is open Wednesday-Sunday: 9-5. They have peaches and strawberries for sale. Starting next week they will have blueberries for sale.


Connie and David Strickland and their daughter, Jennifer Philipp of WJM Farms raise Katahdin and Dorper sheep. They have lambs of both breeds for sale. You can contact David at 770-550-1324.


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SPECIAL PLACES
Yesterday I had the pleasure of visiting Marilyn Austen’s garden with the Merry Weather Garden Club for their monthly meeting. If you ever hear that someone is visiting her garden, beg to go along. I know my photos don’t do the garden justice but hopefully you will get an idea of how individual, colorful, delightful, and just plain fun Marilyn’s garden is. It would take hours or multiple visits to really “see” all of her art but I am sure it is always changing so I recommend just enjoy.


*********************************************************
LIVESTOCK
Beef Cattle Reproductive Management Workshop
Tuesday May 31, 2016 5:30 PM
Program:
Preparing Heifers for Breeding, Pregnancy, and Fetal Protection by Dr. Mark Alley
Georgia Cattlemen’s Association Update by Blake Poole
Select Sires: A Whole New Ball Game by Mr. Will Mayfield
The 16th annual Calhoun HERD Sale
Wednesday June 1, 2016 at 12:30 PM
Commercial Angus Braunvieh Hereford Red Angus Simmental SimAngus
For sale catalog and workshop registration please visit: http://blog.extension.uga.edu/…/04/calhoun-herd-sale-june-1/
I will be out of the office and up in Calhoun on both May 31st and June 1st helping getting the heifers ready for the sale and working the day of the sale. I will also be at the workshop Tuesday evening. If you are at either event please be sure to find me to say hello. The workshop and the sale will both take place at the NW Georgia Livestock Pavilion at 1282 SR 53 Spur, SW in Calhoun.


Deep South Stocker Conference
August 4-5, 2016 in Carrollton, GA
The eighth annual Deep South Stocker Conference is headed to Georgia. This year’s program will offer a combination of seminars, demonstrations, as well as tours. The cost of this year’s conference is $100. This includes all of the seminars, demos, notebook, tour, lunch both days, and dinner. For more information on the program, registration, and location, please visit: http://www.deepsouthstocker.org/
I will have more on this event as the time gets nearer.
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WINEGRAPES
2016 Southern Winegrape Symposium
June 11, 2016 from 8:30 AM-3:00 PM
Carroll County Ag Center, 900 Newnan Road, Carrollton, Georgia
Sponsored by
The Vineyard and Winery Association of West Georgia
The program is for current and aspiring individuals interested in learning more about winegrape growing and making wine. Topics include: Disease and Insect Pest Management, Pesticide Spraying and Safety, Business Planning, Specialty Marketing, Vineyard Test Plots, and much more….
Pre-registration: $50 per person by May 27; $25 for second person from vineyard and $65 after May 27 and at the door.
For more information visit: www.vinewinewga.com
Have a great Memorial Day weekend!
Susan
**********************
Susan C James
Agriculture and Natural Resources Agent
UGA Extension-Meriwether County
scj24262@uga.edu
706-672-4235 Office

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Thursday community service announced for late

KIA Chief Administrative Officer Randy Jackson

A Thursday, May 26, community service will be held for KIA Chief Administrative Officer Randy Jackson, according to an announcement from Page L. Estes, President, LaGrange-Troup County Chamber of Commerce:

As I’m sure you have heard, our community lost a great man on Friday. Randy Jackson, Chief Administrative Officer of Kia Motors Manufacturing Georgia, Inc., died suddenly while traveling. Our thoughts and prayers are with his family and the entire KMMG team. Please see below more information about Randy and the service to celebrate his life.


Obituary for J. Randy Jackson
 

April 12, 1957-May 20, 2016


J. Randy Jackson 59, of Opelika, Alabama passed away on the afternoon of May 20, 2016 at the Seattle, Washington Airport.
Mr. Jackson is survived by his wife of 35 years, Deborah McHan Jackson, son, James Randall Jackson, Jr. (Kayla), granddaughter, Scarlett Anne of Richmond, Kentucky, daughter Jennifer Caley Jackson of Milner, Georgia, granddaughter, parents, James Edward and Pauline Greer Jackson of Macon, Georgia, sister, Delbra Jackson Hayes of Perry, Georgia, nephews, Jonathan Hayes of Smyrna, Georgia, Brian Hayes (Heather) of Perry, Georgia, niece Shelly Hayes Felkey (Jonathan) of Hoschton, Georgia, grandnephews, Tristan and Cruise Felkey, mother-in-law, Janet W. McHan of Dalton, Georgia and a host of aunts, uncles and cousins.
Mr. Jackson was born in Macon, Georgia and attended Jonesco Academy. He had degrees from University of Georgia, was an active member of Sigma Chi Fraternity, Century University and The City University of Los Angeles is where he achieved his Juris Doctorate. Randy was employed in the human resources and administration field for 38 years. He began his career in Dalton, Georgia with Lawtex Industries. He moved to Pulaski, Tennessee to accept a position with Frito-Lay, then Lithonia, Georgia, Sedalia, Missouri, Louisville, Kentucky and LaGrange, Georgia with Alcan Products. In 1996, he crossed over to the automobile manufacturing industry and moved to Alexandria, Kentucky to work with Toyota North American Headquarters, then Tuscaloosa, Alabama with Mercedes Benz of Vance and in 2007, was selected as the first American to bring together the physical manning of the KIA Motors Manufacturing of Georgia facility in West Point, Georgia, ending his career as Chief Administrative Officer. His goal at age 23 was to one day rise to the Vice President level of his career and he surpassed that goal.
Mr. Jackson was a dedicated company man. He gave his all and his best to achieve a harmonious blending of corporate business and human needs. He will always be remembered for tirelessly working to facilitate cultural acceptance in working relationships for common goals.
Randy loved his family and was very proud of his children and excited to become a grandfather. As people close to him knew so well, he loved his rat terrier, Rambo Brodie. He enjoyed those rare times he was afforded an opportunity to spend with his family.
There will be a community service to Celebrate the Life of J. Randy Jackson at 3:30 p.m. on Thursday, May 26 at the KIA Training Center, 900 KIA Blvd., West Point, Georgia. The family and friends will remain after the close of the service to receive fellowship. Honorary Pallbearers are Bill Parr, Mel Haas, Joe Malone, Winston Turner, Maurice Raines, Paul Grimes and Bonnie Colley. Reverend Arthur Williams will officiate the service. In lieu of flowers, as Randy was passionate about furthering education and keeping children from dropping out of school, donations made be made to the J. Randy Jackson Scholarship , THINC Academy, 1 College Circle, LaGrange, GA 30240.
Johnson Brown-Service Funeral Home of Valley, Alabama will be handling the details.

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Request for Bids issued for 2016 road

resurfacing project in Meriwether

Road upgrades are in the works as Meriwether County is accepting bids for patching, resurfacing and restriping of approximately 11.25 miles of roadway in the county.

Please email County Administrator Theron Gay at t.gay@meriwethercountyga.gov for a full copy of the bid package with specifications and description of work. You may also receive a copy of the bid package at the Meriwether County Administration Office, 17234 Roosevelt Highway, Building B. Greenville, GA 30222.

Meriwether County will accept sealed bids until 12:00 Noon on Friday, June 3, 2016. Bids are to be sealed and delivered to the County Administration Office at 17234 Roosevelt Highway, Building B, Greenville, GA 30222. All bids are to be clearly marked on the exterior of the bid as outlined in the bid documents.

The roads included in the project are:

Johnson Road, from SR 54 to Charlie Fuller Road; .3 mile; leveling, resurfacing, striping.

Forrest Road, from paint marking 1 mile south of Lone Oak city limit to paint markings; .15 mile; patching, leveling, resurfacing, striping.

Beaver Chase Lane, from SR 85 to cul-de-sac; .5 mile; leveling, resurfacing, striping.

Ike Williams Road, from SR 85 to Beaver Lake Road; .8 mile; patching, leveling, resurfacing, striping.

Gay Connector Road, from US 29 SR 41 to SR 109 Spur; 1.1 mile; leveling, resurfacing, striping.

Keith Road, from intersection at Wilbur Keith Road to road markings 50 yards south of bridge; .8 mile; patching, leveling, resurfacing, striping.

Pheasant Hollow Road, from Mt. Pilgrim Road to cul-de-sac; .6 mile; leveling, resurfacing, striping.

Mitchum Road, from Hwy 194 to County Line Church Road; 1.8 mile; leveling, resurfacing, striping.

County Line Church Road, from Mitchum Road to county line; 2.2 miles; leveling, resurfacing, striping.

Grant Avenue, from Chalybeate Road to pavement marking at city limit; 1 mile; leveling, resurfacing, striping. 

Mitchell Cove Road, from L.L. Revell Road to Chalybeate Highway; .6 mile; leveling, resurfacing, striping.

Oakland Road, from SR 85 to paint marking; 1.2 mile; leveling, resurfacing, striping. 

McLaughlin Road, from 1.056 LF from end of pavement to paint markings; .2 mile; leveling, resurfacing, striping.

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Customer Service - Hospitality Ambassador training offered

Last year, the Harris County Chamber of Commerce, in partnership with the Pine Mountain Tourism Association offered free training to Meriwether County businesses interested in giving their employees the benefit of this free Customer Service training opportunity. The next phase of this training will be held on June 1st at Callaway Gardens Mountain Creek Inn with both a morning and an afternoon session to choose from.
This next segment is entitled Be Your Customer’s Hero: Real World Tips & Techniques for the Service Industry. Workshop objectives include:
· Avoiding the seven service triggers
· Dealing with nightmare customers
· Communicating like a pro
· Understanding the mind of the modern customer
· Recognizing that customer service begins at the top
"Last year, a number of you took advantage of this opportunity by sending your employees and you are being encouraged to do so again. Those who did attend last year all had favorably comments about the information gained and the helpfulness of the tools presented," said Carolyn McKinley of the Meriwether County Chamber of Commerce. "I hope you will take advantage of this free training, and let me know no later than May 27th the names of the participants. Let me know if you have questions."
McKinley may be contacted at Meriwether County
Chamber of Commerce, P.O. Box 9, Warm Springs, GA 31830; call 706-655-2558, 706-975-0622 or check at http://www.meriwethercountychamberofcommerce.com

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Get ready to celebrate Peach Season in Meriwether!


Kick off summer with a celebration of Peach Season in Meriwether County with the second annual Peaches in the Pines festival at Lake Meriwether June 11 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

More than two dozen arts, crafts and food vendors have already registered. There will be plenty of tasty treats along with peach-themed competitions from sweets to barbecue and an array of entertainment.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Along with a talent competition there are several entertainment groups already planning to perform, including: Men of Stone Quartet - Gospel; Nearly Normal String Bank - blues, old time Appalachian; Jack Couch - soul, Mowtown, '60s and '70s; Kelsey Ray - contemporary and country; and Jessi Bounds - contemporary. 

The Meriwether's Got Talent competition, $10 entry fee, has registration at 11:30 a.m. and the competition starts at 1 p.m. Prize of $100 to the winner.

Enjoy a local arts and crafts showcase, Kiddie Korner, a Disc Golf tournament, Georgia Grown produce, homemade peach ice cream and more.

Lead sponsor for the 2016 festival is Fitzgerald Fruit Farms. Lake Meriwether is at 728 Lake Meriwether Road, Woodbury, GA. General admission for the June 11 festival is $2, with ages 5 and under admitted free.

There is still time for vendor registration. Booths are 12 by 12 feet and are $25 for individuals or businesses, $15 for church or civic groups, and an extra $10 for electricity (limited spaces). Go to vendor information on the website www.peachesinthepines.com for details and to download a registration form.

For full festival information check at www.peachesinthepines.com or call 706-655-3322. You may send an email to peachinthepine@gmail.com or the Meriwether Chamber of Commerce at meriwethertourism@windstream.net.

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2nd annual Peaches in the Pines festival June 11

Come make a Memory in Meriwether!

The second annual Peaches in the Pines festival is June 11 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., bringing family fun under the pines at beautiful Lake Meriwether.

Enjoy free live entertainment, a talent competition and fresh grown Georgia peaches all amid a festive setting offering an array of arts and crafts and food vendor specialties.  

Lake Meriwether Park is over 400 acres, including all the camping and outdoor activities associated with making beautiful memories. The fun packed day includes a newly added Disc Golf amusement, a talent competition, and strolling the grounds of the 144-acre lake site. The park is dedicated to agritourism and wants to share its gems with everyone. The festival is about fun and preserving this beautiful park.

For full vendor deatils go to the website at www.peachesinthepines.com .

...

Second Annual Peaches in the Pines festival is coming June 11, 2016 at 728 Lake Meriwether Road, Woodbury, Ga.  The festival runs 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and will feature arts and crafts vendors; lots of delicious food; fresh homemade peach ice cream and lots of activities for the kids.There is still time to register for vendor space and if you are interested, email the Meriwether County Chamber of Commerce at meriwetherchamber@windstream.net . Booths 12' by 12' are $25 for individuals or businesses, $15  for churches or civic groups, and free for public services organizations such as sheriff, police, fire, air evac, Red Cross, etc. A BBQ competition is $20 per space. The Peach Pie competition and Peach Preserve competition are free. The Meriwether's Got Talent competition is $10 per entry with day-of registration. For full details on the festival and to download an entry form go to the Peaches in the Pines website (www.peachesinthepines.com) contact Meriwether County Chamber of Commerce and Tourism at 770-655-3322 or write to them at P.O. Box 9, Warm Springs, GA 31830. 

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And the winners are ...

Great American Cleanup Day a Success in Meriwether

Keep Meriwether Beautiful held its 2016 Great American Cleanup Day Saturday, April 23, and as a result of the KMB committee, the effort resulted in 248 volunteers collecting 506.5 bags of trash.

There were 27 teams competing for awards for the most litter picked up, and there was a contest for most volunteers on a team. There are two teams that had not reported their results as of Thursday afternoon, May 5, so probably there were more than 500 bags of trash picked up, noted Jane Fryer, president of the Meriwether County Development Authority who is working with Keep Meriwether Beautiful.

These totals do not include all of the tires, mattresses, appliances and general household garbage that were taken to the containers placed in 10 different locations around the county.

Many teams have decided to start picking up litter on a regular basis. Comments from the team "Craigs of the Park" were: "I want to let you know that my children did this cleanup without any complaints and they felt proud to do something good for our environment. We agreed as a family that we will continue to do this at least twice a month. My husband is currently serving our country in Germany or he would have been there with us."

Another comment from the "Piedmont Citizens," a group of retired Georgia Power employees," was: "We are citizens of Georgia Power, helping keep Meriwether County beautiful. Thank you to all that helped get the project together. We are helping the communities we serve be a better place to live."

Others said, "We are going out again and we are ladies in our 70s." Another said they were going to do this as a group on a monthly basis.

Awards were presented at Friday morning's Keep Meriwether Beautiful committee meeting. Team Knox 4 Sheriff for was the largest group, having 25 volunteers picking up trash. Team Springfield, from Springfield Baptist Church, picked up the most trash with 43 bags. There were three municipalities participating in the event and the City of Greenville picked up the most trash with 54 bags turned in. In the school division, Greenville Middle-High School Senior Beta Club was the winner with 29 members on their team. Each team was presented with a plaque from Keep Meriwether Beautiful Chairman Carla Snider.

A fall cleanup will be held on Oct. 21. More details will follow about that cleanup.

Keep Meriwether Beautiful would like to thank Waste Management, Dependable Waste and C&C Waste for their donation of containers for all of the waste picked up and carried to the dumpsters. KMB also wants to thank the Meriwether County Public Works employees who picked up bags for teams that were unable to get to the dumpsters. The Meriwether County Sheriff's Office also worked with community service workers to pick up trash and will continue to do so with the community service program.

For photos from this year's cleanup effort, see the Meriwether County Facebook page!

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Meetings for Landowners this month

From the UGA Extension Meriwether County ANR E-Newsletter
May 5, 2016


TWO GREAT EVENTS THE SECOND WEEK OF MAY FOR LANDOWNERS IN MERIWETHER COUNTY

MEET THE PEOPLE WHO CAN HELP YOU MANAGE YOUR LAND
Thursday, May 12 at 7:00 PM
Greenville Area Public Library


Participating Agencies and Speakers:
USDA Natural Resources and Conservation Services: Rory Richardson
Georgia Forestry Commission: Joseph Moore, Forester and                          Jeff Mansour, Chief Ranger

Georgia Tree Farm Program: Ed Withrow

UGA Cooperative Extension Services: Susan James, ANR Agent for   Meriwether County


Each speaker will give a 15-minute presentation on the programs  and assistance they provide for landowners.

 

LANDOWNERS APPRECIATION DAY
Saturday, May 14 from 11 AM-2 PM


At the Georgia Forestry Commission Headquarters
Meriwether County
Fire Tower Road off LaGrange Hwy
Presented by the Georgia Forestry Commission and UGA Extension
Topics will include:
Timber Sales, Timber Theft, Prescribed Burning, Soil Testing, Site Preparation, Pond Water Testing

For more on topics from insects to fruit diseases, see the full newsletter on our Facebook page.

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It's Youth Baseball time!

It's time for Youth Baseball registration in Meriwether County.The registration deadline is May 20. Play starts in June for Tee Ball (ages 4-6) and for regular baseball (ages 13-15). For details see the Manchester-Meriwether County Recreation flyer, and the accompanying registration form to download.

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Keep Meriwether Beautiful cleanup event a success

Keep Meriwether Beautiful organized a litter pickup event for the 2016 Great American Cleanup. Community volunteer groups registered, received bags and gloves, and went out picking up trash and litter across Meriwether County Saturday, April 23. Some of the volunteers and the trash collected at community dumpsters are shown in images shared by Meriwether County Commissioner Shirley Hines and posted on our Facebook page. CLICK HERE to see more. We'll share the grand totals as soon as all the registered groups turn in their report sheets to KMB Director Jane Fryer! Pictured are senior citizen volunteers in the Luthersville area, and an overflowing dumpster in the Rocky Mount community.

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Meriwether officials tour Greenville wastewater project site

Meriwether County officials attended the City of Greenville Earth Day Celebration Thursday morning, April 21, starting at City Hall and touring the site of a planned wastewater treatment system upgrade.
U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Rural Development and the City of Greenville, Georgia, were celebrating as the City prepares to break ground for wastewater treatment system upgrades that will bring the City into compliance with Clean Water Act standards.
Among those invited to take part were the Honorable Charlene Glover, Mayor of Greenville, Georgia; City of Greenville Council Members; Jack Stanek, Community Programs Director, USDA Rural Development Georgia; Evette Jones, Area Director, USDA Rural Development Georgia; G. Ben Turnipseed Engineers Inc.; and Meriwether County Commissioners and guests will have a project briefing, followed by a tour of the new Wastewater Treatment Facility site. The group will meet at the City of Greenville City Hall, 100 North Depot Street in Greenville, followed by a tour of the site at 740 Woodbury Highway in Greenville.
Safe drinking water and sanitary waste disposal systems are vital not only to public health, but also to the economic vitality of small communities. Helping rural communities build and upgrade their water infrastructure is one more way USDA strengthens rural areas. Building and maintaining water infrastructure creates jobs, boosts the economy, and provides rural families with safe, reliable water and wastewater facilities that improve the environment, say USDA officials.

For more images from the April 21 celebration and tour, see the Meriwether Facebook page here.

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New job stats out

Meriwether County's unemployment rate 6.6% for March. Down from 7% in February.

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Register teams for Saturday's

Great American Cleanup

There is still time to register teams for Keep Meriwether Beautiful's Great American Cleanup Saturday, April 23.

According to Committee chairman Jane Fryer, there will be awards and recognition for the most bags of trash picked up and the largest team.

Register a team any day this week through Friday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Meriwether County Administration Building in Greenville. Teams will receive orange bags to collect trash, along with vinyl gloves and t-shirts to be used during Saturday's cleanup. Each team will fill out a results form to record the number of bags of trash collected and number of participants. Forms must be returned to the KMB office by Tuesday, April 26.

Containers will be placed around Meriwether County where teams may take their bags, or call 706-333-2480 to let the committee know where the team is leaving their bags and the Public Works Department will pick up bags for you.

For more information call KMB at 706-672-3464 or stop by the Meriwether County Administration Building in Greenville.

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City of Greenville Earth Day

Celebration April 21

The City of Greenville Earth Day Celebration is 10 a.m. Thursday, April 21, at City Hall.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Rural Development and the City of Greenville, Georgia, Celebrate as the City prepares to break ground for wastewater treatment system upgrades that will bring the City into compliance with Clean Water Act standards.

Honorable Charlene Glover, Mayor of Greenville, Georgia; City of Greenville Council Members; Jack Stanek, Community Programs Director, USDA Rural Development Georgia; Evette Jones, Area Director, USDA Rural Development Georgia; G. Ben Turnipseed Engineers Inc.; and Meriwether County Commissioners and guests will have a project briefing, followed by a tour of the new Wastewater Treatment Facility site. The group will meet at the City of Greenville City Hall, 100 North Depot Street in Greenville, followed by a tour of the site at 740 Woodbury Highway in Greenville.

Safe drinking water and sanitary waste disposal systems are vital not only to public health, but also to the economic vitality of small communities. Helping rural communities build and upgrade their water infrastructure is one more way USDA strengthens rural areas. Building and maintaining water infrastructure creates jobs, boosts the economy, and provides rural families with safe, reliable water and wastewater facilities that improve the environment, say USDA officials.

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Meriwether officials attend GEDA meeting

Beth Hadley, Chairman of the Meriwether County Commission, Shirley Hines, County Commissioner and Jane Fryer, Director of Meriwether County Industrial Development Authority attended the April 18 monthly meeting of the Georgia Economic Developers Association.

Pictured: Meriwether BOC Chair Beth Hadley and Commissioner Shirley Hines at the April 18 GEDA meeting.

The program was on the film industry in Georgia. Meriwether County is heavily involved in the film industry with some of the episodes of AMC cable TV hit show "The Walking Dead" filmed here and the new Legacy Film Ranch under construction. Other movies have been filmed in our county.

Lee Thomas, Deputy Commissioner of the Film Division for the State of Georgia moderated a panel discussion about the various film projects including an update from the developers of Pinewood Studios Atlanta film studio in Fayetteville, Tyler Perry’s studio, a discussion of Senoia’s success with "The Walking Dead" and a report from Craig Dominey who works with the state film division.

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Meriwether's Great American Cleanup in the news 

Efforts for the Keep Meriwether Beautiful's planned Great American Cleanup April 23 drew attention in the Meriwether Vindicator recently.

For more information on Keep Meriwether Beautiful or to get involved with the Great American Cleanup with a team, contact Jane Fryer at 706-672-3467 or email her at j.fryer@meriwethercountyga.gov .

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Keep Meriwether Beautiful urging National Youth Council nominations

April 15, 2016

Keep Meriwether Beautiful is encouraging area youth to consider applying for the Keep America Beautiful National Youth Advisory Council. The deadline to apply is May 6, 2016:

Keep America Beautiful is accepting applications for the 2016-2017 National Youth Advisory Council due May 6. This is an opportunity for ten high school students (15-18 years old) to participate in a service-learning and leadership development program. Participants will contribute to and inform Keep America Beautiful on programs while acting as ambassadors and leaders for youth service in their communities. The Youth Advisory Council, thanks to the generous support of the Wrigley Co. Foundation, creates a framework for youth engagement at the national, state, and local level in support of our mission "to inspire and educate people to take action every day to beautify and improve their community environment." YAC will attend the 2017 Keep America Beautiful National Conference in Washington D.C. from January 21-26.
 
To learn more about the 2015-2016 National Youth Advisory Council and apply for the 2016-2017 Council, please click here. Applications accepted through May 6, 2016. Application must be submitted online. You may reach the application page HERE.

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Mosquitoes-Here They Come; Ready or Not (Let's Be Ready!)

April 14, 2016

This is from the latest newsletter from the Meriwether office of the UGA Extension Service - April 14, 2016

Some of you may have already experienced encounters with mosquitos. It is time to start paying very close attention to containers and other places where the Yellow Fever mosquito (Aedes aegypti) and the Asian Tiger mosquito (A. albopictus) females may lay eggs. They do not lay eggs in standing water as some people may think. Instead they lay their eggs on the sides of surfaces above the water line. It is when the water in the “container” rises and reaches the eggs that the larvae hatch or eclose. Not all eggs will eclose at the same time, so new eggs are being laid as older eggs hatch. In some locations eggs may possibly stay viable for years but luckily for us winter weather usually prevents their survival.

There are numerous sites suitable for egg laying. The saucers under potted plants, birdbaths, tree holes, corrugated pipe extensions from drain pipes, gutters full of debris, trickling fountains, vases in cemeteries, uncovered boats, bromeliad plants, and of course, tires, are all excellent locations. But bear in mind that even a bottle cap, up-side down, can hold enough water for these insects to complete the egg to larvae to pupae to adult life cycle.

These two mosquito species, but especially the Asian Tiger mosquito, are responsible for vectoring the diseases Zika, Dengue and Chikungunya. There are no vaccines for the diseases and the recommendation by the Center for Disease Control for avoiding infection is to protect yourself from mosquito bites. In a lab study done by researchers at the University of Florida Medical Entomology Department, they found that the most effective repellent was Off Deep Woods with 25% DEET. It was only effective for 5 hours and it is suspected that time period would be much less in an outdoor setting. Products that contained citronella and Skin So Soft only lasted 20 or 30 minutes and they, too, would probably last less outdoors. Wristbands containing DEET or citronella were totally ineffective except for protecting the wrist area where worn. Since repellents are limited in giving protection it is imperative that we do our best to eliminate the habitat necessary for these mosquitoes to reproduce.

Pet lovers need to remember that mosquitoes also serve as the vector for Dirofilariasis immitis, the roundworm that causes heartworm in dogs, but also potentially in cats, ferrets and other pets. You will be helping protect your pets as well as yourself by paying close attention to potential sites for water to collect. Share this information with friends, neighbors and family so we can all enjoy a safe and fun summer.

See the full newsletter on the Meriwether County Facebook page. CLICK HERE.

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April 23 Great American Cleanup event nears

There's still time to sign up for the Keep Meriwether Beautiful Annual Great American Cleanup event coming up Saturday, April 23. There will be multiple teams and rewards! To join in the county-wide effort, download, fill in and mail the accompanying registration form or email to Jane Fryer at j.fryer@meriwethercountyga.gov . The form is also available on our Facebook page HERE.

Jane Fryer, Meriwether County Industrial Development Executive Director, updated the Meriwether Board of Commissioners on the Keep Meriwether Beautiful efforts at the March 22 commission meeting. She handed out litter bags and registration forms.

The Meriwether Sheriff's Office has been working every weekend to pick up trash.

It was noted that the Girl Scouts participating will not be allowed to pick up trash on roadways.

Girl Scout Troop 925 provided art work which will be placed in storefronts through the county.

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Meriwether Chamber's Casual Connections event April 21


You do not want to miss Casual Connections, an annual chamber membership event, says Carolyn McKinley of Meriwether County Chamber of Commerce.

It takes place in the historic and beautiful Roosevelt Warm Springs and promises to be a lot of fun and some great networking opportunities. Many of the event sponsors have display tables so you can get a better understanding of some of the work and great products in our community. It also has some of the most tasty hors d’oeuvres you will find anywhere, including chilled shrimp, fruits and a variety of breads and tasty cheeses. The atmosphere is casual, which means you can come as you are – wear jeans and tennis shoes if you like. Stay as long as you want; leave whenever you want and take advantage of this opportunity to connect with old friends; make some new friends and gain some new business contacts.

Cost is $30 per person for all you can eat and drink…reservations are required. Go to THIS LINK. Or call Carolyn McKinley, 706-655-2558.

"And we look forward to connecting with you!," said McKinley.

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Carpenter bees and ants causing problems

April 7, 2016

Carpenter bees and Carpenter ants have been the subject of recent calls, says Susan James, Agriculture and Natural Resources Agent with UGA Extension-Meriwether County.

She gives tips in the latest Extension newsletter posted on the Meriwether County Facebook page.

There is also information for gardeners and the local farming community, including the schedule of free gardening classes offered in April.

See the full newsletter at the Facebook page, CLICK HERE.

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Final preparations made for April 15 College and Career Expo

April 2, 2016

Summer Doucet of Meriwether County School System says she is looking forward to the April 15 College and Career Expo for local students.

In an email to participants this week she wrote:

"Below you will find the schedule for the schools' attendance at the College and Career Expo.  All schools will start off in the auditorium. There, they will be addressed by the Superintendent. Also at that time, community officials will be acknowledged for their support. Each school will have a School Counselor as their Host. The purpose of the Host is to make sure schools stay on schedule and keep the flow of the Expo going during the time their assigned school is at the Expo.

Schedule for Schools, Grades, Times
 
Unity Elementary School, 3-5, 9:00 A.M. to 10:45 A.M.
George E. Washington Elementary School, 3-5, 9:00 A.M. to 10:45 A.M.
Mountain View Elementary School, 3-5, 9:15 A.M. to 11:00 A.M.
 
Students will rotate through the Expo and eat lunch on site.
 
Unity Elementary School, 6, 10:15 A.M. – 11:45 A.M.
George E. Washington Elementary School, 6, 10:15 A.M. – 11:45 A.M.
Greenville Middle High School, 7-8, 10:15 A.M. – 11:45 A.M.
Manchester Middle School, 6-7, 10:30 A.M. – 12:00 P.M.
 
Manchester High School, 9-12, 12:00 P.M. – 2:00 P.M.
Greenville Middle High School, 9-12, 12:15 P.M. – 2:15 P.M.


Counselors will Host the following schools:  
 
Erika White - Manchester High School
Racine Sales - Unity Elementary School
Kwesi Franco - Mountain View Elementary
Erika Washington - Greenville Middle High School
Gladys Griffin - Manchester Middle School
Randy Gibson - George E. Washington Elementary School


Vendors Check-In will begin at 8:00 A.M.  All participants in the Expo MUST check-in.  Community Officials will be asked to sign-in as well. This will assist in making sure everyone is acknowledge for their participating, time, and donations.

Please send the following by April 6, 2016:
1.  List of all Volunteers - If we do not have their names, they will NOT be allowed to volunteer.  This is a security/accountability issue.
2.  List of Student Organizations and times they will be at the Expo.
3.  RSVP from Community Officials that will be in attendance.

Please make one final contact to vendors to remind them of this great event.  I am so excited for our students.  If you have any questions or concerns, please do not hesitate to contact me.  

Have a great weekend!

Dr. Summer R. Doucet
Student Services/Assessment
Meriwether County School System
Office:  706-672-4297

summer.doucet@mcssga.org

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Meriwether County labor picture updated

March 30, 2016

Meriwether County's unemployment rate was 7 percent for February, compared to 5.6 for Georgia as a whole, according to the latest Labor Profile.

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Tires dumped
March 28, 2016
 

These photos sent to Meriwether County Commissioner Shirley Hines show tires recently found on Holiness Church Road and Rocky Mount Road/362. Commissioner Hines notes: "We have a serious problem with illegal dumping of tires and trash in the county. Illegal dumps diminish the quality of life and livability of the surrounding area. Illegal dumps depress the value of land and neighborhood. The manpower and cost to the county is excessive." The tires on the roadside of Holiness Church Road were actually in a creek. The tires in the trailer removed from Rocky Mount Road/362 were actually at the intersection near Greenville.

 

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Meriwether College and Career Expo April 15
March 28, 2016
 

A College and Career Expo is being hosted by the Meriwether County School System in partnership with the Meriwether County Family Connection on Friday, April 15, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Greenville Middle School. It is an opportunity for students in grades 3-12 to receive first-hand information about career opportunities and post-secondary institutions.

 

The event is designed to help graduating students succeed by providing contact opportunities with technical colleges, universities, employers, career vendors and more. These local students are the next generation of economic development for this region, say Expo organizers.

 

Post-secondary education and employment representatives have been invited to the event to be a part of strengthening the Meriwether County area workforce. Representatives of technical colleges, universities, employers and workforce development organizations have been invited to attend and share information. Requests for participant table space were requested by March 25.

For more information contact Sandra Brown at sandrabrown@mcssga.org or 706-672-4297 - ext. 129. You may also contact Jennifer Corcione, Executive Director, Meriwether County Family Connection at at jcorcione@mcicfc.org  at Meriwether County Family Connection, 17234 Roosevelt Hwy, Bldg. A, Greenville, GA 30222; phone (706) 672-4016; fax (706) 672-4342

 

More information is also at Meriwether County's official Facebook page

 

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Meriwether awarded Georgia Tourism

 

Product Development Grants

 

New grant funding will assist murals,


butterfly gardens, geocache trail

 

March 23, 2016

 

Meriwether County Chamber of Commerce announced today that Meriwether County has been awarded three grants by the Georgia Department of Economic Development’s (GDEcD) Tourism Division to help fund the first of a series of planned murals and butterfly gardens, along with a geocache trail project.

 

The first of a series murals highlighting historic spots in Meriwether's communities will be going up in Warm Springs and Lone Oak, and butterfly gardens will be installed soon in Luthersville and Warm Springs. Also receiving funding is a project for a zombie-themed geocache trail in Woodbury.

 

"Congratulations to Meriwether County's Together in Meriwether team," said Carolyn McKinley, president of Meriwether County Chamber of Commerce. "Three grants were recently submitted to the Georgia Department of Economic Development - Tourism Division. Counties or cities who have been the beneficiary of the Resource Team Visits (which Meriwether was in 2014) were eligible to submit. We submitted a grant for a mural in Warm Springs and Lone Oak; a butterfly garden in Warm Springs and Luthersville and a "zombie-themed" geocache trail in the 'real' Woodbury. All three grants were awarded and we couldn't be more proud!!"

 

These initial murals and butterfly gardens are part of a planned countywide project, putting a mural and garden in each of Meriwether's cities and eventually creating a rack card promoting "Meriwether Murals and Monarchs."

 

"It will be our trail throughout the county. We hope to attract a lot of visitors," said McKinley.

 

 

 

McKinley got the idea for the butterfly gardens during a stop at the visitor center in Plains. "There was a gorgeous butterfly garden," she said, part of the Rosalynn Carter butterfly trail. Doing a little research, she found Mrs. Carter has a passion for preservation of Monarch butterflies and raising awareness. Another plus for the project is that butterfly gardens are beautiful. The Meriwether team is working with Meriwether Extension Agriculture and Natural Resources Agent Susan James in designing the gardens.

 

The third project, Woodbury's geocache trail, will create a sophisticated treasure hunt for enthusiasts who use GPS coordinates to find "stashes.

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"All stashes contain some sort of prize or trinket. You take a prize and replace it with a trinket of equal value," McKinley explained. Meriwether already has several geocache sites, such as at Lake Meriwether and one at Red Oak Bridge.

 

"We have geocachers coming in already," McKinley said. By placing officially-sponsored sites, tourism officials can get a better idea of how many people are using them, she said.

 

With its "Real Woodbury" theme, Woodbury is looking to capitalize on the popularity of AMC television's hit show "The Walking Dead" -- hence the zombie-themed geocache sites.

 

In terms of tourism products, Meriwether is "reaching a plateau in our tourism evolution, so to speak," McKinley explained recently in a presentation to the Meriwether Board of Commissioners.

 

"The last couple of years we have been working on lot of infrastructure things -- website, Facebook, rack cards, getting the visitor center refurbished and set up. All those kinds of things have enabled us to have a stronger foundation to continue moving on our tourism effort," she said.

 

Meriwether tourism leaders in recent years have deliberately chosen products that could be taken to the market relatively quickly with a relatively small amount of money and manpower. They've been successful doing many of those things -- most notably a project involving the Red Oak Covered Bridge, a project that the Meriwether County Board of Commissioners supported.

 

"We are reaching a point now, and even tourism folks in Atlanta have shared with us ... things that can be done with small amounts of money and manpower have been done. It is time to really think about where to go next with tourism. Now we're looking at things a little bigger in scope, requiring a little more financial involvement, a little more person power and that require a lot more cooperation from people throughout the county," McKinley said.

 

Instead of opening this grant offering to all Georgia's 159 counties, the tourism division narrowed criteria to just counties that had resource team visits -- about two dozen counties across state including Meriwether. That narrowed the competition dramatically. Also, state officials were looking to apply funds to those products already in the developmental stages -- like the three submitted by the Meriwether team.

 

In an effort to further tourism product development within the state, Georgia Tourism offered this inaugural grant to communities who participated in the department’s Tourism Product Development Resource Team program. The Tourism Product Development Resource Team program works to evaluate a community’s potential for tourism growth and development through innovative, unique experiences based on a community’s local culture and heritage.

 

“The Tourism Product Development Resource Team has streamlined its initiative to assisting our communities with funding, which is one of the greatest needs in fortifying tourism product development in Georgia,” said Cindy Eidson, director of Tourism Product Development for the Georgia Department of Economic Development. “By providing initial funds to projects that we help inspire, we are jump-starting tourism economic development across the state, helping to not only grow Georgia’s tourism offerings, but also creating new jobs and sustainable economic development in each of these communities.”

 

Since creation, the tourism resource team program has served 31 counties, cities and projects around the state in areas ranging from agritourism to downtown development. Meriwether County is one of 13 communities awarded funding. This funding allows the local community to build new product resulting from the recommendations made by the Tourism Product Development Resource Team members or projects the community has developed as an expansion of the original resource team report.


About GDEcD
The Georgia Department of Economic Development (GDEcD) is the state’s sales and marketing arm, the lead agency for attracting new business investment, encouraging the expansion of existing industry and small businesses, aligning workforce education and training with in-demand jobs, locating new markets for Georgia products, attracting tourists to Georgia, and promoting the state as a destination for arts and location for film, music and digital entertainment projects, as well as planning and mobilizing state resources for economic development. www.georgia.org

 

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Jane Fryer named president of Korea Southeast U.S. Chamber

January 2016

We would like to congratulate Jane Fryer on recently becoming the president of the Korea Southeast U.S. Chamber of Commerce. CLICK HERE to read the full article.

Jane Fryer being honored by Meriwether County Board of Commissioners at the Feb. 10, 2016 meeting.

 

Your Meriwether County Commissioners supporting Mrs. Jane Fryer at her inauguration as president of the Korea Southeast U.S. Chamber  of Commerce.

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Import/Export Highway proposed

Import/Export Highway The Georgia Export/Import Highway is a proposed corridor spanning approximately 80 miles from I-85 near LaGrange to I-75 near Macon.

The corridor could serve as a logical east-west continuation of I-16 and a parallel alternative to I-20 providing a direct route across the state from the Port of Savannah to Central West Georgia. For more information, visit the website: http://www.georgiasexportimporthighway.com

GA Seal
E-Verify # 184026 - 1/26/09